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s/v Tiger Lily
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So, I have my mooring pendant running through my starboard chock with a nice chaffing sleeve ... but when the boat turns sharply the pendant is rubbing the bow (paint) slightly (i.e when the mooring ball is along side the boat on the port side). It's very faint at this point, but I'm sure the effects will increase over time. I have a new coat of dark blue Awlgrip, so the scratches can be seen in the sunlight if you look closely. Is there any way to prevent this?
 

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I'm very new at all this, but why wouldn't you use a bridle? If I understand it correctly, you lead a line from the port side through the mooring pendant and then to the starboard side. That way, the pendant is always off the bow and a sudden movement of the boat would not cause a rub.
What am I missing?
 

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Mooring Rash

This can be difficult to prevent, especially if in your mooring area you encounter wind against tide situations. On some boats, it possible to lead the mooring line through an anchor roller.

Even worse are cone moorings with metal fittings on top that can cause scratches. I have a buddy who keeps a small rug with a hole in the top that he drops over these cones when he's moored.

I really like my dark Awlgrip too, but these are the prices we pay:)
 

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In the mooring field where I'm at, lots of people have foam sleeves over the mooring pendants that look sort of like pool noodles.
 

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I'm very new at all this, but why wouldn't you use a bridle? If I understand it correctly, you lead a line from the port side through the mooring pendant and then to the starboard side. That way, the pendant is always off the bow and a sudden movement of the boat would not cause a rub.
What am I missing?
I usually use a bridle--but I use a separate line looped through the pendant for each side. A single line can slide back and forth through the pendant, causing a chafe problem. With 2 lines you get less sliding, and a redundant line if one fails. (assuming the pendant itself is not the failure)
 

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+1 for anchor roller. I spent 5 months in a boatyard after a 72 knot blow, yep, it was my chocks. If I had come over my anchor roller I would have had a much more pleasant winter!
 

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Have the same problem here. As Cape says, a conflicting current and wind will wrap it, almost no matter what method used. I can not run it through my bow roller, as the metal that extends beyond the roller would definitely chafe right through the line if we were getting tossed around.

I've often thought of applying these clear sheets they make for aircraft fuselages that are in line with the prop arc. When ice is slung off the prop, it smacks the side of the plane and chips the paint. These clear sheets are supposed to prevent it. I will see if I can find a link.
 

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That's the idea, but not exactly what I was referencing. The ice protection sheets were heavier and wider. This tape is usually used on leading edges to prevent chipping from bugs and other runway debris. I suppose the 6 inch wide clear tape might cover the blunt edge of the bow, but I suspect you would need it a bit wider to really be effective. Unfortunately, I'm having a hard time finding the vendor with the ice protection sheets.

As I think about it, I wonder if you could just order it to size from one of the online vinyl sign vendors. I'm not sure they would have clear vinyl.
 

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I usually use a bridle--but I use a separate line looped through the pendant for each side. A single line can slide back and forth through the pendant, causing a chafe problem. With 2 lines you get less sliding, and a redundant line if one fails. (assuming the pendant itself is not the failure)
Ditto..... and a few years ago I even had the Harbormaster at Vineyardhaven, Marthas Vineyard politely insist that I change from the single line I had rigged to the double because he has seen the single 'saw through' his mooring pendants before.
 

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Anyplace that does "car wraps", the vinyl overlays for cars and trucks, etc. also will have clear LEXAN protective sheeting. That's commonly applied to the lower areas of cars to protect them from road gravel and such, and ought to be stronger than polyurethane.
 

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Anyplace that does "car wraps", the vinyl overlays for cars and trucks, etc. also will have clear LEXAN protective sheeting. That's commonly applied to the lower areas of cars to protect them from road gravel and such, and ought to be stronger than polyurethane.
That's a good idea. Still probably not as thick as the ice shield which takes the impact of sling ice coming off the props that spin at hundreds of mph (tips near the speed of sound). Without the shields, the metal fuselage in line with the prop arc takes eighth inch deep dents, let alone paint chips.

Not sure if tougher is necessary. The car wrap is a net idea. Wonder if anyone has tried it.
 
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