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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Our summer spot, in addition to a boat launch, has a mooring beach.

This summer we have been sailing our beach cat, which is all the sailboat I need. However, it is not all the sailboat the wife and kids and perhaps the dog need. Our lake is a decent size, 100 square miles, there are ocean going ships kicking out decent wakes and its windy. The wife and kids and probably dog miss the shelter, toilet, galley and general comfort of having a bigger boat for day excursions and the odd over night.

No problem, we kept our bigger boat just in case.

So my question. The preferred mooring arrangement on this lake is something similar to a Mediteranean mooring. Permanent concrete anchors with mooring floats to the stern, then a bow line to shore. This keeps the bow in a foot or two of water and eliminates the need for a dinghy. Just wade out into knee deep water and climb aboard. Simple.

I have been looking at the mooring posts my neighbours are using and they appear to be just poles driven into the ground with a sledge or axe.

Is this the best way to approach this? Is there a product I can buy that maybe screws into the ground? Does any one use this style of mooring?
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Helical anchor. Laser sailors at my club use them to secure the boats kept on dollies on the beach. Basically a pipe.with a split circular plate welded at the bottom.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Perfect. That looks like a good solution. I found them online for $81.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I spoke to one of the pontoon boat owners and he confirmed they just drove the stakes in with an ax and had 1000 pounds of concrete on the bottom for the mooring. But... he has had his boat moored there since 2008.

Surprised a steel stake driven in with an ax will hold a 2500 pound pontoon boat. The wind howls down the St Lawrence valley.
 

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This reminds me of my "solution" to keep the RIB in the water when we were away so we had the tender available to get to the mother ship when we use the boat in Northport. There were no tie ups/ for dinks for non residents so the options were bring and launch your tender... or buy a seasonal launch service... or I suppose join a yacht club and use their "services".
I had a small mooring set close to an accessible beach with parking. The main problems were the 8' tide range and the muddy bottom. Between mid and high tide I did not have to wade into the mud and it was "do able" kinda. Boat needs to be floating so some wading was required and then I could motor to a near by dock and load things, crew and dog.
I ran what I called a "clothes line" from mooring to the beach... continuous line/loops with 2 blocks.... one at the mooring and one at the beach side... that beach side has a long line connected to the bail and tided to a tree or strong shrub branch,. The "clothesline rig" would sink to so as not to interfere with other moored boats (small) or boats which would use the dock. This was really a Rube Goldberg affair. I had to get and use waders when it was below mid tide. YUCK.
I should have run the line to the dock instead of the beach... no waders or mud to deal with.
It was a PITA and I paid for the launch service the following season.

The concept

139928

The problem.. mud at low tide:

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You should be able to get a helical tie down anchor for $10 or $20 US, but perhaps the $80 CA version is made of something more rustproof.

There is a great product for tying down aircraft on soft field, called The Claw. They work amazingly well, are easier to install and easier to remove than screws. If you're anchoring in sand, I’m not sure they’re the way to go, but if you can anchor in grass, they are excellent. Unfortunately, they only come with three anchors (two wings and the tail) and are a bit over $100US. On the other hand, you’d have spares or a traveling anchor. Just a thought.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The Claw looks pretty cool. ~ $150 isn't bad, not losing my boat would be worth a good deal more than that. The grass is an option.

Funny thing about the Helical anchors. When I search marine helical anchors. $80.

When I search. "Helical anchors". ~$20. Look exactly the same.
 

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Funny thing about the Helical anchors. When I search marine helical anchors. $80.

When I search. "Helical anchors". ~$20. Look exactly the same.
Size? Materials? Or just the "marine" markup? Who knows.
 

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I suppose you could always set a couple of the claws and have a backup, if a line parted or one pulled out of soft substrate.
 

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I suppose you could always set a couple of the claws and have a backup, if a line parted or one pulled out of soft substrate.
I see that the CV101 claw can be bought for $30 individually.

I also notice that the design of the Claw is optimized to resist forces trying to pull it up out of the ground., but in this application the bulk of the forces will be trying to move it sideways along the ground.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Great tip from Seabeau. We have a farmers co op in town with a bunch of helical anchor things.

Question. Has any one tried the helical anchors in water. Its non tidal here. My stern would be in maybe 2 feet of water. It seems to me, I could wade out to knee-thigh deep water and sink a couple of 30 inch helical anchors to their eye posts. Any reason this wouldn't work for my stern posts?
 

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Our moorings are secured bow & stern by helical anchors. They go something like 10-15' into the mud. In case of storm surge,we are cautioned to pay out extra line on our mooring pennants. If they're too tight, the boats would be held down by the anchors against the rising water and when the water got up to the cockpit they would fill with water and sink.
An ingenious way to install them from a boat was In an online thread. You notch a big PVC pipe to fit over the short arms that stick out near the top of the anchor. You then lower the screw end down to the bottom with the pipe "hooked" to it, holding it straight up as best you can. You drill the anchor in by sticking a rod through pairs of holes drilled in the pipe and turning it. As the anchor goes in you may need to move the rod to a new set of holes higher up the pipe. Our club has a hydraulic attachment for this on our mooring barge, but we have more than about 50 of these things.
 

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Great tip from Seabeau. We have a farmers co op in town with a bunch of helical anchor things.

Question. Has any one tried the helical anchors in water. Its non tidal here. My stern would be in maybe 2 feet of water. It seems to me, I could wade out to knee-thigh deep water and sink a couple of 30 inch helical anchors to their eye posts. Any reason this wouldn't work for my stern posts?
I would first probe the strata with a solid rod to determine it's overall density and ensure that there are no rock layers. Based on that data, I would use the longest anchor that I could "drive".
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I have decided to scrap this plan. Just too many concerns about boat damage. The boat was designed to be sailed off a trailer, not kept in the water and certainly not kept 1/2 in the water. Main concerns are to do with rudder vulnerability, non self draining cockpit filling and even possibility of capsize on mooring- the mooring arrangement would hold the boat beam to the prevailing wind and it's a windy place.

So plan B will be to still use the beaching beach but with a bigger multi hull that can be dragged up on the beach where none of these concerns are a concern.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Roller tubes maybe.

But I have come up with a sound plan b that every one is on board with.

We have a Prindle 16 we haven't sailed much in the last few years. It was designed to be sailed off the beach. It has about double the payload of the little Hobie Cat we are sailing and it's a lot faster than the little Hobie we are using.

We will give it a try for next season and see how it goes. Probably use the helical screws for it
 

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I have a heavy-duty cabana for the beach, and, anticipating that winds could quickly jump to 15-20 knts, I used a dog-run anchor for each corner post. Fairly easy to "screw into the sand" about a foot, and never show any signs of their not being able to hold. They cost about $4.00 each at hardware/big box home improvement stores.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Came up with a solution. Bought a huge danforth off kijiji and just anchored in about 2 or 3 feet of water. Works great.
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Looks good too. All you need now is a "boom tent" to cover your lowered mast and you can really start to party!
 
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