SailNet Community banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pictured is some gear I am considering purchasing. This is said to be what I need to construct a mooring for my HR28 on a tidal river off my harbor. Having no experience with building/setting a mooring myself, would anyone care to comment on this rig? My boat is an HR28. I am about 29' LOA and about 6k lbs displacement. Tidal currents can run max 4 knots. The area being considered would have decent protection. Basic plan is one anchor up and one down river with anchor to chain connection using new unpictured thimbles, swivels, and shackles then chain to thimbled/shackled mooring lines. I am working on a price that includes setting the mooring up.

I would appreciate feedback on this plan.
 

Attachments

·
Tartan 27' owner
Joined
·
5,238 Posts
If memory serves me your HR 28 will be mooring in Charleston harbor?
I'm not at all a fan of using anchors for a proper mooring. There are some that get away with it but they are in very protected waters, not somewhere with up to 4 knots of current.

We keep my Tartan 27' on the Hudson River where there is up to 2 knots of current. We use a standard mooring of 250# mushroom anchor, chain that will hold the QE II and mooring ball and pennants. We have weathered two named storms this way; Irene, Sandy. My boat weighs about the same as yours. A better anchor than our generic mushroom anchor is one with a counter weight, like this: Anchor Mushroom 250Lb with Counterweight Made In USA
And even more highly regarded are the pyramid anchors which necessarily weigh a bit more.

I would consider using 2 anchors if I had to anchor overnight in my river that flows two ways but I would never consider it a proper mooring for my boat. I'm not in a mill pond either. The expense of a good mooring can be amortized over the years you use the boat.

A few of the big chandlers have example mooring set up information pages. Jamestown is one of them. Mooring Basics - How to Install a Permanent Mooring

don't cheap out on your boat now!

More importantly, how much fetch, or open water is there where you intend to moor/anchor your boat?
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,225 Posts
I agree completely with the post above. If it is indeed in Charleston harbor, that set up of two anchors is very risky. If either drags it may well foul the other, leaving you with nothing. The fetch from Sumter is more than a mile and the summer T-storms can have 50 knots of wind or more, never mind a hurricane. Spend the bucks and get a proper mushroom anchor and build a real mooring. I've personally seen 75 knots in the Ashley, completely unforecast, that lasted for 45 minutes from the SW. Many boats damaged and a few serious injuries in the City Marina.
Note my signature quote!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,864 Posts
I agree with Caleb as well with some exceptions. The suggestion of a 250 lb mushroom is lighter than used in my area for a year round mooring. Over 1000 lbs is more like it. The Jamestown link suggests light chain all the way from mooring block to buoy. Around here we use 1/2" long link mooring chain for the lower portion and 1" polysteel for the upper half. All chain, depending on depth, can cause the buoy to be too low in the water or even under with its weight. The polysteel is spliced around a heavy duty thimble and attached to the chain with a rated shackle. Long link chain is used as a heavy shackle - say 5/8" - cannot be attached to lighter conventional chain.

The Jamestown link calls for 3/4" chain and a 3000 lb block for your size boat in exposed areas.

I put such a system together for a customer yesterday. It was for a trimaran and his block weighed over 1 ton, with several anchors out from that even.

Many harbors have approved type of moorings for their area. It would pay to check.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
Given all the regulations these days, I'm surprised there isn't a weight requirement for the mooring. On Long Island, the town has strict requirements and you must have your mooring inspected and dropped by a designated boatyard.

Fwiw, like Caleb, I sail a Tartan 27. I'm moored in a protected harbor and use a 300 pound mushroom.

Skywalker
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,130 Posts
Isn't there a navy/sub base up river from Charleston? I would be very surprised, if there weren't permitting requirements for permanent moorings in the harbor.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
634 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for all the feedback folks. This being a new part of the sailing world for me I am being quite cautious and learning as I go. Thanks for adding to my education here. Not sure who to check with on local requirements but will start with CG. That and the consensus I am catching here is that a permanent mooring needs to be quite a bit heavier. Makes sense... Keep the pointers coming...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
Given all the regulations these days, I'm surprised there isn't a weight requirement for the mooring. On Long Island, the town has strict requirements and you must have your mooring inspected and dropped by a designated boatyard.

Fwiw, like Caleb, I sail a Tartan 27. I'm moored in a protected harbor and use a 300 pound mushroom.

Skywalker
Once you have your mooring set up, how is it marked for ownership as you probably have a significant investment with permits, installation costs etc.

For example, you come back right before a significant blow and someone else is tied up to your ball? What are your options? Surely this is a purely
hypothetical question as I am sure no fellow sailor would enchroach like this!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,297 Posts
I don't have enough info to comment on your specific situation, but as a general rule I'd follow local practice. The one thing I would be skeptical of is the top gear....I would recommend chain.

I have successfully used a two anchor, all chain mooring for over ten years in a harbor with 3 mile fetch. The anchors are two 100# danforths with 80 ft. of 1" chain between them (1000 # total weight) and 35 ft. of 9/16th top chain from the middle of the bridle to the swivel and ball. Pennant is 20ft. of 1" braid. With water depth of 25 ft. that gives me about a 3x scope. The anchors are now buried so deep you can't see them. My boat is 47ft x 15 ft. and displaces 24 tons loaded. The bottom is a compact, silty sand.

The rig withstood 12 hours of 50kts plus in a tropical storm a few years ago.

The key to success with this type of mooring is to oversize the bottom gear -- big anchors and really heavy chain relative to the boat size/displacement and potential wave size. Also very important: proper scope, anchors suitable to the bottom type, good quality connections (beware Chinese hardware which is often of dubious quality), and regular inspections.

Re. Anchors vs blocks -
Advantages: my anchors are easier to move than a 6-8 ton block.
Disadvantages: more gear to inspect, and more connections that could fail.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,225 Posts
Isn't there a navy/sub base up river from Charleston? I would be very surprised, if there weren't permitting requirements for permanent moorings in the harbor.
A) Probably the wrong river if he's setting a mooring in Chucktown; there are two.
B) Navy base is long gone.
C) When I was last there, there were very few moorings in the area and DNR had no regulations, nor were there local standards for moorings. (actually, I was shocked that there were such intrusive government regs about moorings when I got to the NE, never mind that they were a blight on every harbor up there, leaving nowhere for visitors to anchor, except Stonington, Ct.)
Got to remember, Charleston is still fighting the Civil War, and those Southern folks accept only a minimum of government intrusion into their sailing activities.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,130 Posts
My knowledge of the Navy base is only that my Father was stationed there in the Marine Corps in the 50s!

Love to hear of a community that rejects government intrusion, but I'm skeptical that Charleston is that radical.

I get the point on NE mooring fields, but we anchor nearly every single weekend without difficulty. Well, without much difficulty.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
168 Posts
I am issued a paper certificate and mooring number. The number is painted on the mooring ball, a sticker to my hull. If the harbor master finds the numbers don't match, you get a call for clarification. I've never been past this point, but I believe that there is a ticketing process and haul out as final action.

Our moorings have to be hauled and inspected every season. Yearly fee ($150), pull and drop (pay by the pound), plus repairs if needed. I think I pay 40 cents a pound.

Skywalker
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,864 Posts
The one thing I would be skeptical of is the top gear....I would recommend chain.

I have successfully used a two anchor, all chain mooring for over ten years in a harbor with 3 mile fetch. The anchors are two 100# danforths with 80 ft. of 1" chain between them (1000 # total weight) and 35 ft. of 9/16th top chain from the middle of the bridle to the swivel and ball. Pennant is 20ft. of 1" braid. With water depth of 25 ft. that gives me about a 3x scope. The anchors are now buried so deep you can't see them. My boat is 47ft x 15 ft. and displaces 24 tons loaded. The bottom is a compact, silty sand.
As far as the rode from the block to the mooring buoy it depends a bit on local regulations as well as depth. In Canada there has to be 12" of mooring buoy exposed. Mooring buoys that are approved are expensive - about $200 to $500 depending on size - larger will float higher with a given load. 1/2" long long mooring chain weighs 2 1/2 lbs per foot and has a load limit of 6900 lbs. 1" polysteel is a product of the commercial fishing industry and has a tensile strength of 21,700 lbs. It has 18% elongation and is about 3 times as strong as the chain. This polysteel/chain combination keeps strength high while keeping the buoy floating at approved height.

Polysteel Atlantic Ltd.

Are you using a weight on the chain besides the 2 anchors? If not it doesn't add up to 1000 lbs I don't think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,992 Posts
Our harbor has helixes installed. One of the problems we encountered with Sandy was that they're so strong that in a storm surge situation they might hold a boat down until the water covered and sank it, unless the lines were let out in time. Helixes can be labor -ntensive to install with divers. Mushrooms let gravity do most of the work and are less involved.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top