SailNet Community banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Once known as Hartley18
Joined
·
5,179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a rather old single-arm Morse 'M'-series engine control that is working well, except that the neutral button is becoming extremely difficult to pull out. I suspect the innards of the thing are clogged up with +40 years of grime and plan to take the whole thing out and clean it up.

Anyone have a manual for this beastie? Any 'gotchas' involved in pulling one out and putting it back??
 

·
Super Fuzzy
Joined
·
17,132 Posts
I have a rather old single-arm Morse 'M'-series engine control that is working well, except that the neutral button is becoming extremely difficult to pull out. I suspect the innards of the thing are clogged up with +40 years of grime and plan to take the whole thing out and clean it up.

Anyone have a manual for this beastie? Any 'gotchas' involved in pulling one out and putting it back??
C .... generically speaking cos I don't know your exact model but taking the handle off is no big deal and you will find that once off a bit of elbow grease and a touch of the new, grease i.e., will solve the problem.

You are tiller steered so presumably the controls are through the cockpit wall ? If so the rest of the mechanism should be exposed behind said wall. Again a good clean up and re lube will sort out your problem, or at least it did for me.
 

·
Once known as Hartley18
Joined
·
5,179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
A, I don't have any decent pics (I'll see if I can get some) but it's the typical old pre-1980's style single-arm control you'd remember if you've been around yachts for a fair while. I've been elbow-greasing it for months now and it's got to the point where it needs to come out and be cleaned up on the bench.

Yep, the controls are through the cockpit wall and access is nigh impossible - there isn't even enough access to read the markings! Given the limited access, I suspect it was connected up and adjusted in the cockpit somehow and then mounted rather than the other way around, although the cables look new and were probably replaced by the OP when the new engine went in in 2009.

I'm a bit wary of disconnecting the cables blindly only to find I've altered something I shouldn't have. From the little I do know, the neutral button linkage is deep inside the mechanism itself and isn't something that is easy to get at... so I'm hoping someone here has been through a disconnection/clean-up/reconnection exercise already (you?) and can point out the pitfalls.


PS: Getting the handle off is the easy part! The grub-screw went walkies many moons ago, so the handle has a nasty habit of falling off all by itself, usually at the most inappropriate time. :(
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
16 Posts
I have a rather old single-arm Morse 'M'-series engine control that is working well, except that the neutral button is becoming extremely difficult to pull out. I suspect the innards of the thing are clogged up with +40 years of grime and plan to take the whole thing out and clean it up.

Anyone have a manual for this beastie? Any 'gotchas' involved in pulling one out and putting it back??
Hi,
I don't know what control lever you actually have but if it's the old Morse MV2 model you can download a good free manual for it here -

http://www.seastarsolutions.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/05/MV2-instruction_manual.pdf

If it is the MV2 be careful when you pull it apart, there is a spring loaded ball bearing inside which could get lost if it pops out. My MV2 was fairly sloppy and needed to have the worn shaft bushes replaced, these are flanged nylon bushes and the Neutral button also has them. They are still obtainble but too expensive for what they are. so I ended up making my own and they work just as well .

The cables can be disconnected by removing the split pins which connect them to the lever arms. You shouldn't have to disturb the adjustent nuts at all.

redx.
 

·
Super Fuzzy
Joined
·
17,132 Posts
C ... as per REDX post you should be able to take the control assembly away without disturbing the cable adjustment. That manual redx linked to looks the go. You should be fine. Get it off , give it a good soaking, make a quick visit to Mr Stainless for a new grubscrew you feckless bugger you and then woopdey do. All will be good.
 

·
Once known as Hartley18
Joined
·
5,179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Made it down to the boat yesterday and this is what I'm dealing with:









Looks like I can probably undo the two screws on the front and drop it out for a better look.. maybe. The neutral button is aluminium and is a bit pitted.
 

·
Super Fuzzy
Joined
·
17,132 Posts
Errk ....

I thought the control I had on my old Northerner was an antique but it does not compare.

Good luck ... I can feel a stroll in the park coming on.
 

·
Once known as Hartley18
Joined
·
5,179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Antique?!? Yep... Just like the rest of the boat. :)

There are no markings visible at all on this unit and the only reason I think it's a Morse (with a missing cover plate BTW) is because it's too blooming ancient to be anything else. I'm sure the Teleflex version (redx's unit) wasn't even a speck in their thoughts when this baby emerged from the factory.

The workings do seem similar to Redx's unit.. but I'll wait and see if he or anyone else has anything else to add after seeing the pics before tackling this project. The tell-tale signs of Sikaflex 291 Black don't fill me with eagerness to get into it. :eek:
 

·
Closet Powerboater
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
I have a unit with a slightly different handle but the internal bits are the same. My previous boat also had the same internal bits but with a wooden hatchet handle for a lever. :)

It's pretty intuitive how the whole thing works and goes apart and back together. Shouldn't be difficult to polish up and get working again. Old but simple....

MedSailor
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,063 Posts
If the innards of this control is similar to the old dual lever controls of Morse I had to renew you will find a plastic bushing or two inside and any you find will be brittle. The first of the two that I restored had quite a bit of corrosion buildup and I sprayed the thing liberally with vinegar to loosen aluminum corrosion and then sprayed with WD-40 to lube the shaft up a bit and then waited a day before taking it apart. The second unit was beyond repair due to corrosion and I replaced it with Teleflex CH 2100 single lever control.
 

·
Once known as Hartley18
Joined
·
5,179 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If the innards of this control is similar to the old dual lever controls of Morse I had to renew you will find a plastic bushing or two inside and any you find will be brittle. The first of the two that I restored had quite a bit of corrosion buildup and I sprayed the thing liberally with vinegar to loosen aluminum corrosion and then sprayed with WD-40 to lube the shaft up a bit and then waited a day before taking it apart. The second unit was beyond repair due to corrosion and I replaced it with Teleflex CH 2100 single lever control.
Thanks, fryewe - a great help. :)

I've been squirting INOX into the gap around the button to try to offset the aluminium corrosion in that area. It'll be a mess inside, that's for sure!

I'll watch out for the bushings. Are there any small rolling or flying things I need to watch out for when I open this beastie up??
 

·
Closet Powerboater
Joined
·
3,925 Posts
I'll watch out for the bushings. Are there any small rolling or flying things I need to watch out for when I open this beastie up??
No, I don't recall any. Man up already and take the damn thing apart! ;) I'm scratching my head trying to remember if there was a split ring involved somewhere..... Not sure that there was. Even so, they're easy to identify and if there is one, and you don't have a set of split ring pliers (I don't) you just have to use caution not to deform them.

It really is a pretty easy bit of kit to take apart and put back together. Another tip for aluminum corrosion is that it seems to get bumpy like it has the pox or something. A bit of sandpaper takes the tops off the proud bits and can smooth up the action somewhat.

Other tips for if you are worried about springy bits flying about are to get a large transparent bag (like an oven bag) and take it apart with your hands, tools and the item all in the bag, much like Homer Simpson working with radioactive stuff with integral gloves in a glass box. That way when the springs let loose they're captive.

Another tip for difficult to disassemble stuff (which this item is not) is to videotape yourself doing it. Then, when you're not sure what order things go back, you can watch the tape... in reverse. ;)

MedSailor
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top