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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

another thread made me ask that question, but I thought I would get better answer by creating a new one.

So here I go:


There is something really weird with motion sickness. In my case, it seems that it starts affecting me when I start thinking about it.

Example: Few weeks ago, my girlfriend and I were near Cancun riding a catamaran in long rolling 4-5 feet wave and we were having a blast (at least I was loll ). Everything was going fine until at some point I told myself “mmm … weird that none of us felt sick yet considering the sea condition”. Then guess what, as soon as brought that to myself, I started to feel a little sick. Not much … but enough to realize that, for me, it seems related to the fact that I start thinking about it. Not sure if it makes sense or not, but it happened to me more than once.

Could it be triggered by a state of mind?
 

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Fortunately, I've never had to deal with seas sickness, but I've seen it aplenty.
My conclusion is that it is indeed very, very much a psychological problem in many. I've only known a hand full of people who have not been cured by a stint on the helm. From my observations, it often rears it's ugly head as soon as land fades over the horizon. It seems to be a symptom of being uncomfortable aboard the boat. Not necessarily afraid, but more like being out of your element. It also quickly becomes a remembered experience, like yours; when you think about it, you expect it.
For many, it is easily brought on by alcohol, a greasy meal before sailing, or a lack of food in the belly, or a combination of two.
The very few I've known who do not get over it after several days at sea, seem to be able to ignore it enough to stand a watch (with a bucket close at hand) or participate in the sailing, because they truly love it and will not allow the sea sickness to spoil their fun.
 

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For me, it is definitely a psychological problem. If i think about it too much, it will come. The ironic part is as soon as someone says don't think about something you start thinking about it! The nice thing about sailing is that there's so much to do that it keeps your mind preoccupied.
 

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I think its half psychosomatic and half physical middle ear imbalance.

Drink a few beers and if fixes both problems. It might sound funny but it works.


Mark
 
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I completely believe its 70% a matter of nerves and 30% physiological. Just from a lifetime of experience and observation.

This does mean it can happen to anyone, but substantially less often for those that are more comfortable on the water or in given conditions.
 

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I only felt slightly sick once, when i was at the chart table in a bad sea...
The problem was that there was a stench of diesel from the motor... As soon as i was back up on deck, i felt like a fish in water again... ;)

But sea sickness is really a physical as well as a psychological problem...
To some the psychological part is the trigger, to others it is mainly physical...
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Ho so thinking about it could bring it... I really was under that impression.

Another time, few friends of mine and I went for a salmon fishing trip on a large charter ship just few miles outside the San Fransisco bay. We were having a blast, the fishes were there but the sea was big... We were losing sight of the shore between waves.

I was not even thinking about it, concentrating on catching the salmons. Out of the blue someone said "ho that is a big sea, lot of people will be sick today."

Guess what, it took 2 minutes for me to turn green after that. EVERYONE on board that day got sick (like 20-30 people). Only the staff was fine.

Again, i had to hear about it before feeling it.
 

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25 years ago, we're about to dive on a deep wreck and the seas are boiling. Probably confused 6-8 ft seas, it was a serious mess. The entire dive team was puking, other than me. Also, while I'm not teaching at the time, I'm the only instructor on the team and feel some sense of pride that I hold it together. I'm not feeling great, but know that all will calm down when I get below the swell, so I remain focused on that.

Just as I'm about to jump, my buddy (who had been puking already) looks at me and says "you don't look so good". I hit the water and barf straight through my regulator. I'm convinced I would not have, if not for that psychological influence. :)

One of the guys was hit in the face by the ladder during recovery, but that's another story.
 
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first day at sea or so I get queezy, always...however after that im settled in

it is psychological if you let it get to you...obviously try all the methods to combat it like looking at the horizon or munching on some candied ginger or dramamine etc...

like most things in life if youre in a vulnerable state of mind, depressed or run down or exhausted any mind state or affliction if you will will be exponentially harder on you than in a normal happy state of mind and body.

tortue for example doesnt work the same way on all people...if one is exhausted its obvious that person will succumb first.

same applies here
 

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Talking about motion seasickness seems to contribute to queasiness.

If someone else gets sick I tend to as well. Normally I can get right back to work.

Only once have I been incapacitated - marking sailing manuals for a couple of hours while below. There was also a change in sea state which will often make me queasy.
 
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I have spent most of my long life near the ocean, and am very comfortable on and around the water. I have been sailing for many decades, and without medication, still get seasick very easily. It is not at all funny and can be a seriously debilitating problem. (I also can't read while a passenger in a car.) I must admit that I get a little annoyed at people making remarks that it is "all in your mind", usually accompanied by "I never get seasick". I have experienced it on everything from small boats to those big gray metal ones the Navy uses. Medication used in advance usually lessens or completely prevents it for me. It is primarily physiological and very real. If you don't suffer from it you simply don't know.
 

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There is the power of suggestion (anyone ever hear of a 'barf-o-rama'?), however, in some cases it could be coincidental. As the boat goes off shore some people start getting sick, and happen to mention that they are getting sick, while another onboard then starts getting sick. Hard to say if they would have anyway. If you had been off shore for days, and everyone on board was fine, and someone walked up to you and said you look green, and you chunder upon his face... well then I think there may be something going on.
 

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Its all in your head, your eyes tell you one thing and your inner ear tell you something different.

My favorite was an Engineering duty officer we had in the Navy, the minute they would ring the bell & say "Under Way" he would run for a trash can. 100% in his head !
 

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I have posted a ppt that I have used in some of my classes. I also share it with offshore crews

<div style="margin-bottom:5px"> <strong> <a href="https://www.slideshare.net/JackDale/seasickness-causes" title="Seasickness causes" target="_blank">Seasickness causes</a> </strong> from <strong><a href="http://www.slideshare.net/JackDale" target="_blank">Jack Dale</a></strong> </div>
 

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Motion sickness is very idiosyncratic. Some folks never get sick, some always get sick, most of us are somewhere between those extremes. Also, the particular motion of a boat has idiosyncratic effects; there are certain boats on which I often feel queazy, and some on which I almost never have a problem (my own boat, for instance, but probably just because I'm used to it). Not thinking about getting sick helps, as does experience. Keeping busy, keeping ones head up and looking at the horizon, not trying to read or do anything intricate (particularly anything with ones head bent down, or craned up), and avoiding strong smells (e.g., diesel, vomit, or anything normally unpleasant) all also go a long way toward avoid the dreaded mal-de-mar. But worrying about getting sick is definitely a trigger.

I try not to eat any spicy and/or rich food while on the boat to immediately before sailing; I try to keep well hydrated, and avoid too much coffee (it both over-stimulates and doesn't help me keep hydrated); I don't read a lot, unless it's very calm or I've already been at sea for a couple of days; and I often take a Bonine (or a half a Bonine, depending on the expected conditions) before a day sail. And, as Jack indicated, some folks can "work through" getting sea-sick, while others can't. If I do get sick I usually can get right back to work. Some folks, usually those unaccustomed to being on a boat, feel totally incapacitated once they barf (in large part because they often try lying down and/or going below, two of the worst things one can do).
 
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I always got seasick on fishing boats. Hot weather, bobbing up and down. Would even get sick before the first dive on week long dive trips in the Caymans, which I took twice a year for 10 yrs. Biggest chop there was 1' at best.
I windsurfed when I was younger and day sailed a few times but stayed away from buying a boat until 2012 because of the fear.
But with sailing I keep too busy to worry about it. Only time I felt bad on my boat was after a big greasy meal from McDonalds, then sitting in the slip and the boat rocking and bobbing from wind chop. I do sail only in the bay but so far so good. Of course, I probably just jinxed myself.
So heat, exhaustion and the wrong foods to contribute but for me it is mostly in my head and if I keep busy no issues.
So no, you are not crazy!

Once I was in a windsurfing race off of Virginia Beach. Wind died, it was hot and I was bobbing up and down. Lasted about 5 minutes and I was out. Incapacitated. Heard yelling and whistles but could not even lift my head. Drifted about 2 miles down the beach before the lifeguards swam out and pulled me in. Slept about an hour laying in the sand, then walked back to where I started. I was lucky I didn't drift out to sea.
 

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I think its half psychosomatic and half physical middle ear imbalance.

Mark
Either way it is all in your head ;)

As one with quite a lot of experience with Mal de mer (One bout lasted 21 days no less!:eek:), I did a lot of research and wrote an essay on the subject. :puke

For a dedicated cruiser seasickness is problematic. My solution is simple - no more tough guy. I take drugs. :)
 

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Reading through all this i have to say, i must be blessed... ;)
The only time i feel dizzy and uncomfortable is on land after some time on the boat... especially in confined spaces like a toilet...
Every time i go on a boat, feel the movement of it, i get this "i am home" feeling...
I can drink, eat anything and reading for hours in the cabin, even hold the hair of a lady while she feeds the fish and even smell the vomit - no effect whatsoever...
 
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