SailNet Community banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hope I am posting this in the right forum...

I need help finding a compatible motor mount for an older (1983) CL16 Sailboat by CL Boatworks.
I have tried repeatedly to contact someone at C&L Boatworks, but they appear to no longer be operational. I once got one reply, but no more responses despite multiple Emails and Facebook posts to them.

There are 4 bolts on my transom that are for a motor mount that used to be made for my boat but is long gone by the time I purchased it.

I just want to put on a small trolling motor.. I tried putting it on the actual transom, but it gets tangled-up with the lines and I need it mounted "further back" to be out of the way.

I am attaching a photo that shows the 4 bolts on my transom, and then a "sketch" I made that shows the distance between the bolts. It shows they are 6 inches apart "wide" and 3 1/2 inches apart "vertical".

I believe these boats used to have some sort of wooden mount that went here that you could then mount a trolling motor or even a small outboard to.

I have looked at a number of motor mounts on Amazon and other sites, and even purchased a few (but then returned them) because the bolt patterns are different and I don't want to drill additional holes in my transom and am hoping can find whatever used to here..

Also, there is no sort of "BLOCKING" inside my boat where these bolts lead, so whatever I put on must be very light. since I don't want to put too much stress on the transom.

I found a very light trolling motor by "Watersnake" that is less then 10 pounds and I have confirmed it can move my boat, so I just need something that will fit those bolts and have some sort of "mounting plate" where I can attach the trolling motor.

Thanks for any help or advice you can provide.

Regards,

Michael
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
I'd probabliy just build one out of marine plywood. Make a box with no top or bottom that sets the motor back far enough. Bolt the front to the transom using the existing holes and then hang the motor off the back. I would use a backing plate of some sort on the inside of the transom to spread the load form the bolts though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Thanks for the advice... I have actually started to consider that as an option.

What is the best option for "Marine Grade" plywood (wood type), and any idea best place to get it? Could I just get exterior grade plywood from my local home depot, or is that not good enough?

And how do I need to finish it? Could I just stain it and then use a marine varnish to waterproof it? Would that work?

And presume I would use stainless steel bolts and washers..

And isn't there a special "marine sealant" you use after you put the bolts through to waterproof the holes?

Thanks for the help...

Michael
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,599 Posts
..... I once got one reply, but no more responses despite multiple Emails and Facebook posts to them
If you received one reply, I assume they or a successor are still around. I understand the convenience of sending queries via email and social media and that good customer service should respond to them timely. I send them on weekends too, when I know they aren't around and have had a variety of experiences from answers first thing Monday morning to never.

Being on the receiving end, I do have some sympathy. These digital media are overwhelmed with spam and illegitimate inquiries, even sales jobs. Sometimes a technical inquiry comes from a vendor in disguise who wants to sell their solution to it. Frustrating and time consuming. Further, most writers do a very poor job of describing their issue. They know what they're looking at, but don't describe it well enough or leave out critical information.

Pick up the phone.

Literally this past weekend, I left an email at the technical service address for the manufacturer of my onboard TV, Jensen (ASA electronics), as I was having trouble getting external speakers to work. No reply by Wed, so I dialed the number. I got someone on the phone immediately and had my answer in seconds. Pick up the phone.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I have tried to call them via good old landline.... was actually the first thing I tried... since I wanted to speak with someone to explain in detail everything I was looking for.

Unfortunately, the listed phone number appears to no longer function and I get a message that the "call cannot be connected as dialed" when dialing it.
I tried googling alternate numbers for them, but only get the phone number listed on the C&L boatworks website, which doesn't work.

I have tried to make my emails very specific and explicit, and received back one response only, and no further responses since.

I recognize things are crazy for small companies due to Covid, but things in Canada (where they are located) are not as dire as some other places, and I would hope to get some sort of response, or even an acknowledgment that they will get to it, even if delayed.

Frustrating situation indeed...

Michael
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,189 Posts
You could probably use dimensional lumber.

You might want to build a backing plate. Either ply or dimensional lumber should work. I might try finishing it with white paint to match the colour of the hull.

I have attached a pic of the trolling motor mount that was on my boat when I bought it. The previous owner built it, looks like just a spruce 2x4. It lasted a number of years until I creamed it off a limestone wall leaving a lock. I never replaced it, because I prefer my gas motor.
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,587 Posts
I've danced the motor mount cha-cha a couple of times now. Building one yourself is one way to avoid drilling new holes in your transom. The easier (and I think better) way is use a mount like snash has suggested, but instead of mounting it directly to your transom, mount it to a piece of starboard or g10, then mount that piece to your transom using the existing bolt-holes. An adapter, if you will. Both G10 and starboard are waterproof and UV resistant. No finishing or protective coatings needed. And yes, use stainless nuts, bolts and washers. The biggest washers you can get.

And I would reinforce the inside of the transom too. Very simple. The high-class do it yourself way: glass a piece of marine-grade plywood (not available at Home Depot or Loews -- at least not the ones near me -- you will need to find a real lumber yard) over the bolt holes on the inside of the transom. Drill out the bolt holes again, this time at least two sizes larger than you need. Fill the holes with thickened epoxy. Let cure. Redrill through the epoxy for the proper sized bolts. This will keep any water intrusion from getting into the plywood core. A note about marine-grade plywood. It is preferred, but not necessary for something like this. If you are careful to seal the edges of the plywood with glass and epoxy, and you protect the holes with epoxy, then regular, exterior grade plywood will do you just fine for this application.

The method I would use: using Gorilla Glue or another waterproof polyurethane glue, glue a piece of g10 or starboard (g10 is stiffer and probably better) over the bolt holes on the inside of the transom. Drill holes through the g10 using the existing holes in the transom. Mount your adapter/motor mount using the old holes. Done.

This assumes that the manufacturer sealed up the original bolt holes so that water wouldn't get into the core. If the transom is uncored, then no worries. But if it is cored and the plywood or balsa is exposed in the holes, then I'd seal them up as noted above with thickened epoxy and redrill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Yeah.. I'm starting to get the feeling that I need to probably build this myself at this point..
I'm new to sailing and marine work. Learning as I go...
And the transom is just fiberglass.. no wood core.. its a fairly light boat.. that's why I want to put some type of "backer" behind it..
Any idea where I can find a small piece of "G10" or "starboard"? And what "thickness" should I be looking for? Half inch? Inch?

And how do you attach the motor mount into the starboard.. can I use a stainless steel "screw" (do they "hold" in it?) or does it need to be a "bolt" with a washer from behind?

Sorry for so many questions.. want to do this right, and my marina doesn't really provide any help for 'sailboats'... unless you are fixing an engine, they aren't too interested and would charge a mint to do something custom like this...

Thanks.

Michael
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
4,189 Posts
While you are designing your trolling motor mount, you may want to put some serious thought into how you are going to secure a potentially 40 or 50 pound battery. As CL 16's are unballasted dinghies, the securing method for the battery needs to be totally secure. A loose battery can do a lot of damage in a capsize.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
Thanks for the advice... I have actually started to consider that as an option.

What is the best option for "Marine Grade" plywood (wood type), and any idea best place to get it? Could I just get exterior grade plywood from my local home depot, or is that not good enough?

And how do I need to finish it? Could I just stain it and then use a marine varnish to waterproof it? Would that work?

And presume I would use stainless steel bolts and washers..

And isn't there a special "marine sealant" you use after you put the bolts through to waterproof the holes?

Thanks for the help...

Michael
Many lumberyards have marine grade plywood. For this purpose you probably would get away with exterior grade ply if it's sealed with varnish - might have to replace it sooner. I generally use a urethane varnish to cover wood like this. Give it a few coats & it should be OK. Would not stain it. I'd be concerned about the stain bleeding.

Your other option would be to make a plywood adapter plate that has holes to match those in your transom and another set to match a commercial motor mount like the one posted below. That might be the easiest thing of all.

Stainless bolts always. Anything else will rust. As to marine sealant, you have stumbled into one of the great areas of controversy. Many use silicone. They may be cursed by sbsequent owners of their boat. Many others (and they are correct) say never use anything with silicone on a boat. It leaves a residue that makes getting anything else to stick later a real problem. The best thing IMHO is butyl tape. It easily conforms to the surfaces & seals, but also comes off when you want it to. Look for MaineSail's posts here on how to use it (he sells a very good grade as well). I use nothing else to seal any penetrations in the boat & have no problem with leaks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
363 Posts
Can't fnd the edit function in the new format. Always use through-bolts for something like this. At a minimum use backing washers on anything that's through-bolted. For this application, I'd make a backing plate the same size as what is on the outside of the transom and put the bolts through that as well. That will spread the load from your motor out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,587 Posts
Yeah.. I'm starting to get the feeling that I need to probably build this myself at this point..
I'm new to sailing and marine work. Learning as I go...
And the transom is just fiberglass.. no wood core.. its a fairly light boat.. that's why I want to put some type of "backer" behind it..
Any idea where I can find a small piece of "G10" or "starboard"? And what "thickness" should I be looking for? Half inch? Inch?

And how do you attach the motor mount into the starboard.. can I use a stainless steel "screw" (do they "hold" in it?) or does it need to be a "bolt" with a washer from behind?

Sorry for so many questions.. want to do this right, and my marina doesn't really provide any help for 'sailboats'... unless you are fixing an engine, they aren't too interested and would charge a mint to do something custom like this...

Thanks.

Michael
I think 1/2" G10 or starboard would be fine. You could probably use 1/4", but I don't know the specifics of your job. You can get either from Defender.

King Starboard Marine Lumber

You will have to bolt the motor mount to the G10 or Starboard, then bolt the G10 or Starboard to the transom. You should countersink the motor mount bolts on the back of the adapter plate so that it will mount flush against the transom.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top