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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
hey guys, im busy devouring the forum.

mostly the details about what to look for on a sailboat. spent time through out my life on motorized guzzlers, not much time behind the sails. i am a defacto motorcycle mechanic, run my own business, so im not bad when it comes to hands on approach.

just want to say that if ANYONE is interested in getting into riding motorcycles i know the entire industry and all the bikes like the back of my hand, so i can save you tons of time and money, from which bike to get and what to look for to carriers rates laws all of it. its been my life for a while.

hopefully someone can do me the same favour here. need a crash course. im in washington dc, going to get myself something here, 25-30 ft, a total beater, and go beat around the caribbean for the cold times. thats my plan, its sink or sail, ive got cabin fever. i also have the option of packing up everything and goin down to florida and finding a boat there. wondering if that might be a better option. i just want a beater with a place to put a bed and hull space for bike stuff. nothing fancy. want it to get around, and not sink until may when its warm again. im sure ill want to trade up again for the following year anyhow....

i have spent significant amounts of time in the woods hiking and doing survivalist type living, having a clean bed and clothes is honestly better than i live now, im more of the caveman type, so being in the sun and water daily is better for me, and my dog, so when i say im ok with a beater, i mean it, im all about functionality, cosmetics and aesthetics and how it might look to others is something thats not even on the list. from here to there as cheap as possible, fit my stuff in it, doesnt sink anytime soon. done.

i would like someone to tell me what the minimum i need to legally sail around is. im not concerned about insurance unless theres a really good reason, ill take my risks. certifications...licenses....my dog is a campanion pet, and i have worked with rescue dogs for a long time, so i know all the angles on that, and shes current on all shots and tagged chipped tattooed and getting her settup with a gps implant before i leave. where we can and cant go easily will obviously determine a fair amount, but i plan to not frequent tourist hubs anyhow.

thats about it. great forum.
 

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Aquaholic
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1,139 Posts
Welcome aboard Troy, you've definitely come to the right place.
 

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blue collar cruiser
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370 Posts
There is no minimum size requirement for cruising, just your own personal demands for space. 25 to 30 feet is plenty big enough for one and a dog. The boat you buy will have to be either registered with your state or documented with the federal government. That's about it, besides your passport, etc. You'll need a place to keep it, too. Moorings are the cheapest but you may have to get on a waiting list depending on demand where you are.

Lots of older boats from the 60s and 70s have solid fiberglass hulls which can be brought back to life very nicely, as long as there is no structural damage. Deck damage can be severe with old boats though. The hardware on the deck is through bolted and when the bedding compound fails water gets through and soaks the wood core and it rots. This can be very extensive and expensive so watch out for it.

Sails are also expensive so look for a boat that doesn't need all new ones.
 

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Wharfinger
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19 Posts
Half of us have or had motorcycles

It's amazing but many sailors were or are motorcyclists. Ask Around and you'll be amazed. Maybe it's a freedom thing or maybe it's that we don't mind spending some money on the good things in life.

As for starting in sailing, find a good training centre and take some winter courses in seamanship, sailing and VHF. Stop by any marina or yacht club and the members will be more than happy to steer you towards a good course. Join a yacht club and stop by for a beer. Once they know you're a newbee they'll gladly help you with whatever you need, from boat buying to world cruising and everything in between. Ask about their racing program and offer to help crew on any boat that needs a hand. Racing is a fun social activity and you'll quickly learn from watching and helping.

Racing your own boat is the best way to learn how to sail her efficiently and effectively. Race courses are laid out to make you work hard for some of the turning marks, and doing so demands that you learn the boat. I still remember my first race that I wasn't last. Yahoo!
 

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Registered
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725 Posts
There are a few sailing clubs in DC. Also SOS singles on sailboats cruse a lot around the area. Maryland school of sailing and seamen ship across from Annapolis in Rock Hall MD are having some blue water cruses right now. Suggest take a class and talk to others. Oh and welcome!!
 
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