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If you hoped for a female companion that identified as a gay male, you'd be enlightened and in the clear.

Appreciate the passage report. Glad it's been successful. Hope to hear more about the refit. Wish I had a Whaler's on hand to raise a toast.
 

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You may have lost a mast, run out of Milk, Battery Life, Got eaten alive by Flies of Some Kind ;-0 , Broke the Washing machine, Beat into green water, BUT...you never ran out of BEER! and you haven't lost a sense of Humor! Congrats! on a successful trip.

Caitlyn Jenner will be calling!
 

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I had forgotten how easy GPS positioning and electronic aids have made life. I was a gliding flight instructor for a while and wouldn't allow my students to use GPS while planning and executing cross-country flying. This made them (and me) rely on charts and dead-reckoning for navigation; and unfolding a big aviation chart in a small cockpit isn't easy! It was very stressful for students but I believe in Aleksander Suvorov's adage "Train hard, fight easy". It looks dark to the west - it is probably a CuNim but since I'm already under the shield cloud I can't see how big it is. I've got 4 feet under my keel and now have 100 feet of chain out so I'm certainly not going anywhere whatever the weather is going to be!

It took me an hour to drain the washing machine, one glass at a time due to bad access. In the end the pump had sucked up a lot of fluff, a little plastic bag, and a drying towelette (how the h***k did that get in there?) so now I'm running attempt #2 off the inverter and really, really hoping that I don't have to repeat the nasty draining process...

Thanks again to everyone on this thread for the advice, recommendations and other comments. And no thread drift, either :)

So, my last night aboard. Stevie Ray Vaughan on the stereo and ice-cold Whaler's Rise IPA in hand while anchored safely in a beautiful anchorage with good holding... About the only thing that would put icing on this cake is some female companionship (am I allowed to day that these days - or do I have to delete the female and just say companionship?).

Glad you like our little anchorage.....good music....and screw the political correctness...keep it female
 

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Are you still in Paris, Mark?

Nah. Miss Hotness had to come back to work. So there for the Bastille Day weekend. Amazing stuff! The military parade was fantastic... More tanks than I've seen in my life.
 

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Reading this thread reminds me of Sailnet of many years ago. Helping a fellow sailor, whether that is with directions and suggestions on a trip, or how to do anything sailing. This one stayed on topic for the most part and was helpful.Congratulations to all who contributed!
 

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Discussion Starter #169 (Edited)
I'm going aboard for the last time today and then flying to Europe. This trip, and thread, has been fun. I have an 8 hour flight and if there's enough room to the seat in front of me I'll finally get around to editing the pictures and posting them.

Here is the first one, with Zanshin moored off the Newport shoreline right by the public dock. At this point in time the engine wasn't running and I was waiting for parts to arrive.
 

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I followed the whole thread. Enjoyed the hell out of it. As a West Coast sailor (San Francisco area) I don't have any experience with the trip you just took, so reading all the details allowed me to understand it a bit. Congratulations on a great voyage, and congratulations to all the people who posted to make it a collaborative success. Cheers!
 

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Hats off to the man who solo.d .
 

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who got by with a little help from his friends.... ;-)
:2 boat::2 boat::2 boat::2 boat::2 boat::ship-captain::2 boat::2 boat::2 boat::2 boat:
 

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Discussion Starter #174
Sailing a long passage, like the one from Annapolis down to St. Martin when I picked up the boat, is actually much easier than planning and executing this 500+ mile trip. Once out at sea, the autopilot does much of the work and one needs to look at the weather. But on this trip it was necessary to be on deck and on watch much of the time, and even when I went below I had my kitchen timer go off all the to force me to poke my head up and scan the horizons. I never went off soundings and don't think I was ever in water deeper than 100 feet and that meant that fish pots were a constant source of worry. That kind of concentration is not necessary at sea and away from any shipping channels.

So I did have a little help from my friends (and my Raymarine assistant, "Otto")

I'm writing this from the train in Germany, heading south from Frankfurt. Looking out the window I've seen 2 of bigger shipping stretches and canals and they are about at wide as the entrances to some of the anchorages I've been in during this trip. The size of the TSS zones is also much bigger than I'm used to.

I'm still working on editing my pictures, but I could barely fit my Kindle reader between myself and the seat in front of me during the flight from Baltimore and the thought of a nice cold German beer at the end of this trip is keeping me from concentrating.
 

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Good points

It’s interesting to see your comments as they point out the nuances which coastal cruisers or weekenders face daily when using the sailboats.

Cruising certainly is easier in the respect of the long passage with virtually no boundaries around you except in the beginnning or end. Having to take into account shallow anchorages, tide changes, current changes, shipping lanes, inlets, are great skills to be good at and utilize frequently. On your specific trip it required figuring out how many miles you could make daily and where close to that distance you could anchor for the evening. You were conservative so you would remain well rested and alert through the whole trip, as you were single handing.
You had some sections where you could anchor like the Jersey coastline and Delaware River. It was a good test of your skills.

Other who read who have never taken this kind of adventure but want to try their hand eventually at trips like this watched and took notes I am sure. I know I did from others when I first started coastal cruising. The majority of the SN readers are smaller sailboatsrs . The trip you took is certainly doable for anyone having a 25-57 foot sailboat. Those who read along should advance their sailing and see new places as you can easily do it.

Their are many on here to help with their advice too. You will get many different options and opinions. You just have to filter through to make your final decision congruent with you sailing, your crew and your destinations.

Many are wary of the ocean, which I find easier to navigate than the Chessie or the Sound.
 

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As they say
Not the wind but the waves kill you
Not the ocean but the hard edges sink you
Not the fear but the bravado gets you in trouble.

Hats off to an old not bold sailor.

Hats off to anyone who does coastal sailing to new places. Think that’s the hardest thing to do.
 

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The point Zan makes about the level of attention and concentration required when sailing coastal is spot on. One can never really let your guard down and must constantly be attentive... to boats, the bottom, the buoys... currents, and so on... Sailing off soundings when most of those concerns are gone is a very different experience.
 
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