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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
just read it,interesting.
a different picture of William than what is generally been shown.
he was pretty good mariner.
sailed with cpt. Cook
 

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What did you just read?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
a book entitled "Mr. Bligh's Bad Language " written by Greg Deming.
found it at a used book store on beach street in Dirtona.
examines the mutiny and voyage from an historical aspect and alot of related things about the crew and mutineers fate.
tells about the capture of those who remained on Tahiti as well as those that went to Pitcairn Island .
Which is still inhabited by the descendants of the mutineers!
 

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Did the book also tell the story of Mr Bligh after his sailing tour?


Most often, people doesn't change. Unfortunately.

/J
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Did the book also tell the story of Mr Bligh after his sailing tour?


Most often, people doesn't change. Unfortunately.

/J
Yes,the book discusses Cpt.Bligh to great length. his maritime career as well as how he was portrayed and from records and ships logs compares him to other captains of his time in the royal navy as well as the political mindset of the time as well as the trial of the mutineers that were captured on Tahiti and how the ones with connections to influential families escaped the nuse, while two were hung.
alot of stuff all about it.
Cpt. Bligh actually was sent again to Tahiti to do the breadfruit run with a second ship and crew and had a long work history of service after the bounty mutiny!
great read, couldn't put it down.
even talks about the films and books written as well as the fate of the mutineers who made it to Pitcairn island who were not discovered for decades after the incident.
published in 1992.
 

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I read a book a couple of years that proposed that Bligh's reputation was the result of a smear campaign by the Heywood and Christian families.

I will try to remember the title and author.

Bligh Island at the entrance to Nootka Sound and Bligh Reef (which the Exxon Valdes struck) after named after him.

Both Bligh and Vancouver served under Cook.
 

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Apparently they are a bunch of perverts too :eek:
Plus the one that moved to the USA and then died on the replica Bounty :(

a book entitled "Mr. Bligh's Bad Language " written by Greg Deming.
found it at a used book store on beach street in Dirtona.
examines the mutiny and voyage from an historical aspect and alot of related things about the crew and mutineers fate.
tells about the capture of those who remained on Tahiti as well as those that went to Pitcairn Island .
Which is still inhabited by the descendants of the mutineers!
 

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cruising all I can
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Apparently they are a bunch of perverts too :eek:
Plus the one that moved to the USA and then died on the replica Bounty :(
What,what? tell me what you mean, was there a mutineer descedant aboard the modern bounty when it sunk?
the book is 445 pgs. it's alot to absorb in a single reading.
it covers the trial of the mutineers that we're brought back to England.
It also tells about the journey that was launched to search and retrieve the mutineers and how over half of them died being brought back! the ship that captured the one's found on Tahiti wrecked and sunk near Australia.
The Mutineers that stayed with Fletcher Christian went undiscovered for 20-30 years and only one was still alive with a bunch of women and 20-30 kids. Today Pitcairn island is still occupied by the descendants!
awesome book.
 

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I read a book a couple of years that proposed that Bligh's reputation was the result of a smear campaign by the Heywood and Christian families.

I will try to remember the title and author.

Bligh Island at the entrance to Nootka Sound and Bligh Reef (which the Exxon Valdes struck) after named after him.

Both Bligh and Vancouver served under Cook.
The book is: The Bounty: The True Story of the Mutiny on the Bounty: Caroline Alexander: 9780142004692: Books - [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@415IifujlaL by Caroline Alexander. A great read. It really puts a different spin on the stereotype of Bligh as a tyrannical bastard. In fact: quite the opposite. One of his goals was to complete the entire voyage without using corporal punishment. I believe that he only had to resort to the 'cat' on one occasion. Compared with Royal Navy Vessels of the time the Bounty was very progressive.

Bligh tried to emulate Cook in providing a nutritional diet (to prevent scurvy) and promote exercise - in the form of dancing - amongst the crew.
I think that his light hand, combined with the crew's resentment of the 'new ways' were key factors leading up to the mutiny. The fact that Bligh was a commoner and his officers were 'high-born' or at least had connections in society didn't help him any.

I think Bligh should be touted as one of the most brilliant seamen / navigators in history.

I don't think Bligh was a good leader however - his tenure as Governor of New South Wales is an example of this.
 
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just read it,interesting.
a different picture of William than what is generally been shown.
he was pretty good mariner.
sailed with cpt. Cook
Bligh not only sailed with Captain Cook, he was the sailing master on at least one voyage. He and Cook are responsible for charting the Australian east coast and Torres Straits, as well as many other islands in the SoPac. Many of the charts I used sailing the SoPac and Oz, were directly credited to Cook, Bligh and I believe, if memory serves, the HMS Endeavor, right on the chart. As a matter of fact, their charts were amazingly accurate and the first time I ran across an uncharted reef was when I sailed into Fijian waters, which Cook never charted.
 

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The book is: The Bounty: The True Story of the Mutiny on the Bounty: Caroline Alexander: 9780142004692: Books - Amazon.ca by Caroline Alexander. A great read. It really puts a different spin on the stereotype of Bligh as a tyrannical bastard. In fact: quite the opposite. One of his goals was to complete the entire voyage without using corporal punishment. I believe that he only had to resort to the 'cat' on one occasion. Compared with Royal Navy Vessels of the time the Bounty was very progressive.

Bligh tried to emulate Cook in providing a nutritional diet (to prevent scurvy) and promote exercise - in the form of dancing - amongst the crew.
I think that his light hand, combined with the crew's resentment of the 'new ways' were key factors leading up to the mutiny. The fact that Bligh was a commoner and his officers were 'high-born' or at least had connections in society didn't help him any.

I think Bligh should be touted as one of the most brilliant seamen / navigators in history.

I don't think Bligh was a good leader however - his tenure as Governor of New South Wales is an example of this.
That's the one.

Merci Mucho
 

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Maybe not a great leader, but Captain Bligh was an excellent navigator and seaman, sailing a 23ft/7m open boat with 18 men aboard over 3600 nm/6700 km/4100 mi.

Voyage of Bounty's Launch
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Mr Bligh's bad. language- the book, was published in 1992 and addressed several of the books mentioned in this thread as well as Bligh's voyage in the dingy after being set adrift.
It also discusses the 4-5 movies made and even the actors chosen.
plus stuff like the white sand the film company spread on the Tahitian beach. apparently the beach naturally is black in Tahiti
 

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Claudene Christian (October 18, 1970 – October 29, 2012)[1] was an entrepreneur, sailor, gymnast, singer and beauty queen.[2][3][4][5][6]

Christian claimed to be a lineal descendant of Fletcher Christian, the leader of the mutiny on the Bounty, and one of founders of the occupation of Pitcairn Island.[7] In August 2012 Christian was interviewed by the Halifax Chronicle Herald, after she joined the volunteer crew of a replica of the original HMS Bounty, built by MGM for a film about the mutiny.

The vessel sailed into Hurricane Sandy on October 29, 2012.[8][9] Fourteen members of the ship's complement were able to board a life raft and were saved. The Virginian-Pilot quoted United States Coast Guard Captain Joe Kelly, who described how Christian and the ship's captain Robin Walbridge were about to join the rest of the ship's complement in the life raft, when the Bounty rolled, plunging them into the ocean.[10] Search and rescue crews from Coast Guard helicopters rescued the crew members from the life raft. When Christian was found, ten hours later, she was "unresponsive". Resuscitation was attempted, but she was pronounced dead in a shore-based hospital.

Patrik Jonsson, writing in The Christian Science Monitor, citing the connection between Christian and her supposed great-great-great-great-great-grandfather, called her death "an almost inexplicable twist on that family legacy."[11]

Pervert issues:
http://www.vanityfair.com/culture/features/2008/01/pitcairn200801

For most of its history, Pitcairn lived with a secret sex culture that defined island life. Adultery was not just routine but pervasive, as was the sexual fondling of infants and socially approved sex games among young children. Incest and prostitution were not unknown. The criminal charges stemmed from a longtime island practice of “breaking in” girls as young as 10.

The legal case had dragged on for eight years and threatened the island’s survival. Sharp divisions existed over Mother England’s fairness in forcing the weight of English law onto a tiny population as isolated and lost in time as Pitcairn’s. Colleen McCullough, the Australian author of The Thorn Birds and wife of a well-known Pitcairn descendant, harshly criticized the British for prosecuting what even the Foreign Office grudgingly conceded was a “cultural trait.” She said, “It’s Polynesian to break your girls in at 12.”
 

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A good read. Well written and researched. Read it a while back on a Sailnetter's recommendation. It really gives you an appreciation of the man's ability.
 

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Maybe not a great leader, but Captain Bligh was an excellent navigator and seaman, sailing a 23ft/7m open boat with 18 men aboard over 3600 nm/6700 km/4100 mi.

Voyage of Bounty's Launch
What'd I say?

"I think Bligh should be touted as one of the most brilliant seamen / navigators in history." :confused:
 

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What'd I say?

"I think Bligh should be touted as one of the most brilliant seamen / navigators in history." :confused:
Agree. Just providing documentation for *why* I think so.
 

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We had an interesting experience crossing the Pacific that was certainly not planned. We visited several places that were part of the Bounty saga. These included Tahiti where the crew became enamoured with life in a better place than they were used to, Pitcairn where the mutineers went, Timor where Bligh and his open boat went, a bay in Northern Queensland where Bligh made his landing in Australia before carrying on up the coast. The only placed we missed was where the mutiny took place. If we had decided to go there from Mangareva we would likely have avoided the knockdown that we got on our passage toward Tahiti or Hao (we kept changing our mind over a couple of days as we got different weather info.

Edit: I also agree that Bligh was a superior sailor and navigator. We have a non-fiction book on the boat about the mutiny. It is really good until the last chapter when the author decides that the mutiny happened because of the breakup of a homosexual relationship between Bligh and Christian. About the only evidence the author has for this is that they knew each other before leaving England and homosexuality of ships at the time was very common even though the penalty for it was hanging.

BTW, Pitcairn visit was a highlight of our trip. What no one mentions is that it is a remarkably beautiful island.
 
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