SailNet Community banner
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My plan is to be fully retired at the age of 57 and to be a fully qualified sailer to at least cruise up and down the Chesapeake Bay, east coast and the Caribbean by then. Currently researching courses to take and associations to join. My plan which will be changing with the wind, was to buy a catamaran before I retire and be a weekend sailer and possible 2 week vacationer a year (The cruiser reserves). But after reading this from Jeff H

In any event, I would suggest that at the very least you try to get some sailing lessons. If I were in your shoes, I would sit down and put together a list of all of the things that I would want to know before I set off voyaging such as:
• Boat handling
• Sail trim
• Rules of the road
• Weather
• Routing
• Boat husbandry, repair and maintenance
• Diesel/ gas engine maintenance and repair
• First aid
• Heavy weather tactics
• Legal restrictions on leaving and entering foreign countries
• Navigation, (Piloting, Celestial, dead reckoning and electronic)
• Provisioning
• Radio operators license exam requirements
• Safe and dangerous fish to eat
• Sail trim
• Survival skills
• Etc………..

Once I had what I thought was a complete list, I would set up a schedule to try to develop those areas of skill that I was currently lacking. As much as possible I would try to involve all those involved in as many of those aspects as each is capable of understanding. This process could take as little as a year, but more often takes two to three years. The process itself can be very rewarding and can build the kind of bonds that are required to be cast away on that oh so small island that a boat underway represents.

After sailing for a few years you should be able to further define your goals and develop your own sense of what is the right size and type of boat to do what ever you decide to do.

Thinking a smaller boat would do while I'm in the cruiser reserves.

BTW my first hurdle to get over is the last couple of times I was on a boat I got sea sick and that never happened to me before, is that something that comes with getting older cause when I was younger I never would get sea sick?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,928 Posts
...

BTW my first hurdle to get over is the last couple of times I was on a boat I got sea sick and that never happened to me before, is that something that comes with getting older cause when I was younger I never would get sea sick?
Welcome to SailNet.

Many get seasick and keep on sailing. Figure out what triggers it and avoid whatever that is. For me, when I sailed up the coast I was barely functional the first 12 hours. After that, not a problem. I just needed to adjust to the motion of the boat. The other more experienced crew members, knew that it happens and you deal. They didn't make a big deal over me just made me feel comfortable and emptied my bucket when necessary. I will forever be grateful as it made a bad situation bearable.

At our marina I know that spicy chicken wings and a giant margarita do me in. I've learned the meaning of moderation on that front. We keep a bucket with my name on it near the berth. Sometimes on day sails I get sick and looking desperately at the horizon helps. So far I haven't had to resort to drugs.

However, don't ignore the fact that seasickness can be seriously debilitating and may impact your safety (and others') at sea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Welcome to SailNet.

Many get seasick and keep on sailing. Figure out what triggers it and avoid whatever that is. For me, when I sailed up the coast I was barely functional the first 12 hours. After that, not a problem. I just needed to adjust to the motion of the boat. The other more experienced crew members, knew that it happens and you deal. They didn't make a big deal over me just made me feel comfortable and emptied my bucket when necessary. I will forever be grateful as it made a bad situation bearable.

At our marina I know that spicy chicken wings and a giant margarita do me in. I've learned the meaning of moderation on that front. We keep a bucket with my name on it near the berth. Sometimes on day sails I get sick and looking desperately at the horizon helps. So far I haven't had to resort to drugs.

However, don't ignore the fact that seasickness can be seriously debilitating and may impact your safety (and others') at sea.
Yea if I can't get over this first hurdle this 11 ear plan/dream will be scrapped.
:puke
 

·
Crotchety Old Member
Joined
·
909 Posts
BTW my first hurdle to get over is the last couple of times I was on a boat I got sea sick and that never happened to me before, is that something that comes with getting older cause when I was younger I never would get sea sick?
This hits all of us from time to time. If I simply don't drink alcohol the night before we are off, then I am fine. Other rules of thumb are:

  • Don't go below unless you have to, and then only stay down there for a few minutes.
  • Don't read or look at a computer screen for very long.
  • If you start to feel it coming on, stand at the helm, turn off the autopilot, and steer.

Those work for me and the first mate. You will also find that after about three days out, you can do pretty much as you want without getting sick.

On learning to sail, we read a lot, watched a lot of videos, bought a small, cheap, sailboat that we could afford to lose (and lots of insurance), and took her out for short sails. We're on our fourth and final sailboat now, seven years (and 3000 miles) later, and have started to become a little more confident in our abilities.
 

·
Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,354 Posts
Welcome to SailNet.

Many get seasick and keep on sailing. Figure out what triggers it and avoid whatever that is. For me, when I sailed up the coast I was barely functional the first 12 hours. After that, not a problem. I just needed to adjust to the motion of the boat. The other more experienced crew members, knew that it happens and you deal. They didn't make a big deal over me just made me feel comfortable and emptied my bucket when necessary. I will forever be grateful as it made a bad situation bearable.

At our marina I know that spicy chicken wings and a giant margarita do me in. I've learned the meaning of moderation on that front. We keep a bucket with my name on it near the berth. Sometimes on day sails I get sick and looking desperately at the horizon helps. So far I haven't had to resort to drugs.

However, don't ignore the fact that seasickness can be seriously debilitating and may impact your safety (and others') at sea.
You keep a bucket of spicy wings by your berth, or is that a bucket of Margaritas? I am confused.
 

·
Full time cruiser
Joined
·
540 Posts
retire at 57 - wish i had.
now on topic - i take it you are in your 40s and unlike some here i am not an advocate of going small then sell and get the boat you want.

we were never on a sailboat until dec 2000 when on a lark we took the first asa sailing course.. liked it so much took 2 more lessons in march and the boat 3 days after the lessons. we chartered a couple of times and in 2003 bought a brand new jeanneau ds40. at the time we lived in miami and we sailed 3 weekends out of 4. we kinda learned to sail. 2007 at age 62 i retired, we got rid of everything and headed out. we have not been back. and we are still learning how to sail. we will never be great sailors but then we know a lot of sailors who are much better who can't seem to get much beyond their home port while we have sailed the east coast of the usa 3 times, bahamas twice, the western caribbean from mexico to colombia and across the caribbean to jamaica and down the eastern caribbean to trinidad the back up to antigua and across the atlantic on a 2 peron crossing. we just completed year 2 in the med. great sailors we will never be - adequate i guess would describe it. we can hold our own but will never be great.

as for a small boat in our opinion not. a few reasons.
first boats never appreciate in value and depreciate a lot and the curve is steep. how much of a loss are you willing to take?
second the market for used boats is not great. we know of a couple of people who went small and could not sell small or took a huge hit on it. how long are you willing to sit and read about those out cruising while your small boat is for sale and you sit.
third you can write off some of the cost of the as a second house and get it partly paid down while you have an income.
fourth you will get to know your boat and what works and what doesn't and what you think the boat needs and spend some time getting her ready.


at 11 years out you have lots of time to charter a number of boats, attend boat shows and really figure out what you want. then about 3 - 5 years out get the boat you want and begin the count down.

it worked for us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,128 Posts
I have noticed a slight correlation between getting older and getting seasick. However, I believe anxiety is still the number one cause. Being out on the water, in unfamiliar conditions, can create anxiety. As you build experience, the anxiety declines and so does the propensity for seasickness. However, it always remains a possibility for all of us.

Last thought. Good to have a plan. However, you're apparently 46 now. I've known countless people to have grand early-retirement plans at that age, only to postpone when the time comes. What typically changes is the recognition that one more year of work is a lot of money. By then, big expenses are usually behind you, so one more year can be saved. Then another and another. Better yet, once you've reached the point where you technically could retire, referred to as financial independence, working doesn't seem as tough. Psychologically, you could walk at any time. Just food for thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
15 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I have noticed a slight correlation between getting older and getting seasick. However, I believe anxiety is still the number one cause. Being out on the water, in unfamiliar conditions, can create anxiety. As you build experience, the anxiety declines and so does the propensity for seasickness. However, it always remains a possibility for all of us.

Last thought. Good to have a plan. However, you're apparently 46 now. I've known countless people to have grand early-retirement plans at that age, only to postpone when the time comes. What typically changes is the recognition that one more year of work is a lot of money. By then, big expenses are usually behind you, so one more year can be saved. Then another and another. Better yet, once you've reached the point where you technically could retire, referred to as financial independence, working doesn't seem as tough. Psychologically, you could walk at any time. Just food for thought.
46 wow are you trying to put me in a senior citizens home? I won't be 46 until this coming April! :laugher
 

·
Full time cruiser
Joined
·
540 Posts
did forget one thing - seasickness. have you tried ginger cookies? start eating before you board and eat them all day long. we have had a couple where we did not feel well while underway and they settled the tummy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
dhlamar, my opinion is heavily biased but a great way to learn to sail on the Chesapeake Bay is to join up with a race boat. The strongest skill you can bring to the table is punctuality, the crew and skipper can teach you boat and sail handling but need someone who can show up every week on time. A good club reputation as someone willing to be there on time, learn, follow instructions, and pitch in time and effort on boat projects can't be beat, it can lead to opportunities on other boats by word of mouth.

Racing is different from cruising, many hands make light work, but it will get you an introduction and contacts on the bay. There are clubs on the Potomac near DC and up and down the Bay depending on where you work and live.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top