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· Telstar 28
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Just to play Devil's Advocate... I'd point out that non-use is worse for a boat than constant use with good maintenance. I would be worried about the "pristine" appearance of the Hunter, especially if it is the result of the boat having been cleaned up just for sale. Often, a boat that isn't used will also be neglected and not have the basic maintenance done to it.

I'd also recommend you read the Boat Inspection Trip Tips thread I started, as it will help you determine what shape both boats are really in...

However, it does sound like the Hunter would be the better choice of the two. PO's can do a lot of strange things and fixing what they do can be very frustrating. ;)
 

· Telstar 28
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Davits are a really bad idea on a boat that small. It adds a lot of weight aft, and the boat's trim will really be messed up IMHO.
 

· Telstar 28
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A proper downhaul on the jib would get rid of most of the problems with dropping the jib, and could even be rigged to allow you to drop it from the cockpit.

I'm also curious as to why you have your girlfriend doing the harder work of dealing with the sails on the foredeck, while you're steering the boat? Is she not capable of helming the boat???

Finally, I'd point out that if you and your girlfriend are going to sail as a couple-you both need to be able to single hand whatever boat you have, since a cruising couple is often best described as two people singlehanding the same boat at different times. If she isn't capable of doing that, what do think will happen if you get caught by the boom or are incapacitated by the bends, or fall overboard???

CaptKermie - I gave it alot of thought on the older / complete vs new(er) / incomplete, and determined I wanted the same thing you found with yours.
Plus I live 10 minutes away from where the boat is going to be docked so I will have plenty of time durring the week to go and work on little projects.

I've actually never spent any real time on a boat with a roller furling before, they have all been traditional jibs, but since it's going to be me at the helm much of the time, and my girlfriend on the sails. I want to make certain it can be put both up, and down by her safely in any conditions we encounter (don't really want to risk a potential MOB situation if I don't need to). I've been in situations where 2 full grown men have trouble pulling down a traditional jib and keeping control of it. If she's on the sails, then her safety could be risked with a traditional jib. Factoring that in, a roller furling is needed not just wanted.
 

· Telstar 28
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Ouch... that's a pretty good reason...;)

because I have either torn cartalige, or a hairline fracture in my wrist at the moment and it hurts like hell when putting any turning / torquing force on my wrist, like working a winch or pulling lines. I should find out next week exactly what's wrong, either way she's going to have to work most of the lines for the next month or three.
 
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