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I picked up a project boat this past weekend after a year of planning to go down and pick it up. With work and preparing for my girlfriend to leave for Navy boot camp, I just kept putting it off. Not to mention the trailer needed a new axle and some rubber to make the journey to Austin, TX. Well she is now off in Great Lakes, IL for a few months and I have something to occupy my time while she is gone. After four hours, I finally got the axle swapped out (which I robbed from my work trailer temporarily). I do love the idea of a galvanized trailer with steel u-bolts holding it together. Then it was time to move on to the black magic that is the world of trailer lights. Another four hours, and that was finally finished. Normally these tasks would not take me this long, but I was an hour from the nearest decent sized town, and running to the hardware store was not an option. By 11:30pm it was time to hit the road. (Hopefully I'm inserting the images correctly)



I finally got home from what is usually less than a two hour drive in just over 3 to some very unhappy dogs. I was a little concerned about the structural integrity of the bolts and the water in the bilge so I kept it around 55 the whole way.

Here's what she looked like when I got up the next morning.





After pressure washing...





Then came the task of tackling the inside after work on Monday.




After using a shop vac and a brush, I was able to knock the rough off it.



No more standing water!


So, when it stops raining I'll get back in there and continue the cleanup. I'm fortunate that I have all the main components intact, such as the mast, boom, winches etc.

With that, I do have a question for those that know. Will it cause damage if I pressure wash the inside of the boat and suck the water out as I go, or should I just go by a bunch of rags and cleaner and get after it? I don't mind the extra work as I don't want to take any steps backwards in this project. Needless to say, I'm a happy camper to finally have my own boat. Even if it does need some work, it's still mine!:D

Thanks for reading,
T.J.
 

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If you are replacing all the wiring etc. inside the cabin anyway, I don't see why you could not pressure wash the inside. Just be careful that there are no exposed areas where you might force water into the core of the fiberglass. I probably would not spray the ports directly. Also, you will probably end up with a LOT of water inside the boat that will have to be pumped out. Otherwise why not.
 

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Barquito
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Maybe a lower volume spray, a scrub brush, and a shop-vac. Unless you completely tear the boat appart, you could be scrubbing for weeks.

The approach to the nasty/stinky boat I have is to do a basic scrubbing, targeting places you can see more than the ones you can't. Then starting with the anchor locker area, clean, prep, and paint with porch paint. Then move back one locker at a time. Boat projects always take way longer than you plan. Don't let it take away from sailing time.

I assume you have some basic resources:

catalinadirect.com
chipford.com/projects.htm
etc.
 

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I carefully pressure washed mine, which was in worse shape.
Use a wet/dry shopvac to get the water out
Not too hard...
You can do this in an afternoon if you work hard.
 

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Barquito
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Maybe a lower volume spray, a scrub brush, and a shop-vac. Unless you completely tear the boat appart, you could be scrubbing for weeks.

The approach to the nasty/stinky boat I have is to do a basic scrubbing, targeting places you can see more than the ones you can't. Then starting with the anchor locker area, clean, prep, and paint with porch paint. Then move back one locker at a time. Boat projects always take way longer than you plan. Don't let it take away from sailing time.

I assume you have some basic resources:

catalinadirect.com
chipford.com/projects.htm
etc.
 

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GREETINGS EARTHLINGS . you can use bath cleaner to polish the inside and make it smell nice (for fibre glass baths) I would use Oxalyic acid to clean the outside but you need to know what your doing this stuff can burn you. talk to your locan pharmacy and ask for giudence and advice (but it does bring the hull up grand) GO SAFE
 

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Wow. That's quite a project. You have your work cut out for you. I'm always amazed that people take obviously wrong shortcuts and then don't take care of the results. Even so, that boat must have an interesting story! I must say, your replacement compression post looks positively spindly.

Have fun with while your GF is gone.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
I appreciate the pointers on the clean out, hopefully when the rain stops I'll be able to give it a go. I do believe I'll start with low pressure and see where that takes me.

As far as the compression post, that is what originally came with the boat. I wondered that same thing the first time I crawled in there about a year ago. All of the c-22's of that time period I've seen on sailboatlistings and similar sites with interior pictures have that same post in them. You can see it here in this ad:

1984 Catalina Sailboat sailboat for sale in Kansas

The plan is to get it all cleaned up and then take it out to my buddies hangar nearby in work on it indoors. Thanks again for all the advice.

T.J.
 

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@ Perithead - The biggest repair I can see so far is yanking out the swing keel and taking care of the rust issues. It looks like one of the cleats was damaged at it's mounting points and they did a rather ugly repair job. I seems solid, but I'm a little to OCD to let it slide. My buddy with the hanger knows how to do fiberglass repair, so we are going to fix that up. A couple of the trim boards around the hatch need to be replaced as well. The bow pulpit is a little out of whack, so I'm going to see if I can get it straightened out since stainless steel aint cheep.

I did set up that blog, but I haven't put anything on it yet. I'll post the address when I get something on there.

I do have this 48 Evinrude Zephyr laying around my garage. I'm wondering if I should fix it up as well and use that for my outboard, but I'm not sure if the shaft is long enough. Any thoughts?
 

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TJ,
Being able to work indoors is a huge plus. Another site to check out is catalinaowners.com. They have a section just for C22 owners, and the sites Barquito recommneded are excellent.

Believe it or not Catalina still supports these boats. A few years back I was able to get manuals and information from Catalina on our 1994 C22. If you register in the owners section you can download the original brochure and see how she looked new.

They're great boats. Best of luck with her,
Jim
 

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The bow pulpit is a little out of whack, so I'm going to see if I can get it straightened out since stainless steel aint cheep.
Keep an eye on Ebay and Craigs List for the bow pulpit.

You need a long shaft motor and I didn't see a motor mount in the pics.

Jim
 

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Thank you Jim, I just registered with them as an owner last night. The oldest brochure I saw was for the mkII though. I believe they started making those in 86 or something like that. I did email them to request the manuals and already got a reply back that they would be sending me some information. I was definitely impressed. I also just got set up on catalina owners under the same name as on here.

I gotta say, it's really cool to see how quick people are to chime in and help out. It's a huge help, and definitely appreciated!

Thank ya,
T.J.
 

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I had a feeling that might be the case. I do have a new adjustable motor mount that came with the boat, but was never mounted. It seems I'll be trolling craigslist in the near future for something with a longer reach.
 

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Also check out
http://www.catalina22.org/

They have their own magazine called Main Brace for C22 owners that has great articles on repairs/upgrades that's included with membership.

Here's a sample issue online:
http://www.catalina22.org/mainbracesample.php?issue=mainbracesample09

They also have a book-on-CD that includes a ton of articles on fixing common problems that crop up with these boats and answers common questions.

Here's a link to the history of the boat (61 pages)
http://www.catalina22.org/documents/files_history/2009-Catalina22Book.pdf
You do know that more C22's have been built than any other sailboat model right?

Also I saw that the local C22 fleet is based right in your town. They would be a good source for parts and information as well.
http://www.catalina22.org/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=50:fleet-21-great-lakes-il&catid=27:region-4&Itemid=9

Again best of luck with her. We loved our 22, they're great boats and you'll have a lot of fun with her.


Jim
 

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Looks good Jack, congrats on your new boat!

Did it come with mast/sails? Are the cb and rudder in working order? I think a C-22 is a great boat to mess around with, since it is small enough that projects don't take too long to complete, and don't cost too much either.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Once again Jim I do appreciate it. Lots of good info there. In fact I shouldn't have checked sailnet while I was at work. I ended up spending an hour and a half surfing those sites, and ended up having to stay late. I probably didn't learn my lesson though.

@Peterchech - I do have the mast(with spreaders intact) and the boom. Luckily the main sail was kept out of the sunlight for the past 15 years in a sailbag. I've taken it out and every thing seems to be in tip top shape with it. The previous owners had purchased the main a few months before the boat was put away and never used again. Unfortunately the jib didn't fare so well. I even have a good main sail cover. I still need to go back and dig through their mountain of crap in their garage to locate the rudder, but they say that it is in there somewhere. I did find the tiller however. As for the cb, it doesn't look pretty but it goes up and down. I'll be pulling it out once I get it to my buddies hangar and getting it cleaned up. Cool thing though, as I was digging through some of the boxes of stuff that came with the boat, I found a treasure trove of brass and stainless steel screws, bolts, cleats and other doodads they bought a while ago when they were planning on fixing it up. Needless to say, I'm a pretty stoked dude right now. Looking forward to tomorrow when the weather clears so I can finish cleaning out the inards.

@Landlocked - Thanks dude! I most certainly will!
 

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Will it still have as much integrity as a straight block of wood? It looks like a stairwell post.
My thoughts exactly, Donna! I am blown away by the thought that all C22s of the period came with that kind of post. It looks like something from Home Depot. Apparently it works sufficiently well.

Even if he puts it on the to-do list to replace, it will be far down in comparison to other items mentioned after our posts.

Tom
 
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