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Discussion Starter #1
I am going to buy my fist boat, hope to have the money by spring. I have limited sailing experience, but i was pretty good back in the day. I'm a 20 ish law student with little money and less time. How much shoud i spend (the price of the boat and trailer) and how much will it cost (the real costs, fixing stuff, paying off property owners when i rip up their grass trying to launch)?
 

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Detachable member
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377 Posts
it really depends on what you can afford. as far as how much it will cost, that depends on what you buy and what kind of shape it is in. if you can be more specific on what you are looking for/thinking of buying, you will get better answers to your questions.:puke
 

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Mud Hen #69, Mad Hatter
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New? Used? Do you intend on spending overnights or multi-day cruises? Just daysailing? Alone? One or two crew along? How big is your tow vehicle? Do you want power to get out of a marina (some don't let you sail in or out), river mouth or channel?

Need some general help - otherwise you can get a trailerable sailboat for $600 to $120,000 or thereabouts that is between 11 and 28 feet long.
 

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Wandering Aimlessly
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As above, you need to define what you expect to do with the boat, before any input can be helpful. With your location, easy travel distance limits you pretty much to how large you can go. Something on the order of a Flying Scot or other popular small boat that can be used in racing, would seem to be a good idea for your area.
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
Ok.. so my question was really vauge... sorry. some thing to get back into sailing, day sailing, used, and I am a student so cheep is the word. I kinda wanna get something that i can resell for a bigger boat, some day. And i can row out of the marina if I must... it doesn't have to store more than a sandwich, PFD, and a six pax, nor set more than two or three. I don't need a jib or a spinnaker (need and want are two very, very different thing, but law school is expensive). Centerboard, of course, maybe something like the butterfly i use to sail. but I became a cat man a while back (don't hate me), so a small cat would be cool.
 

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There are a million Catalina 22's out there. Cheap, fun - and fairly easy to re-sell to up-and-coming attorneys.
 

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Mud Hen #69, Mad Hatter
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415 Posts
Ah. Much better. At the small end I'd recommend a Chrysler Pirateer. You can get one with a trailer for under $1,000 and it rows fairly well. We had a Gloucester version ( I believe the same molds) and it sailed nice with one aboard but was a bit slower with two and loggie with three but still doable. Has a jib but it is so small and simple on a rig that size it is no bother.

If you can tow a Catalina 22 it is much more boat. There is a busy market for them (especially if you keep it nice) and you can usually move them fast when you want to upgrade. Doesn't row for beans but you could scull it and impress everyone with your marine prowess. Really not that hard to learn.
 

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Any thoughts of joining a sailing club? I would think as a law student, the last thing I'd need would be boat ownership. If you joined a sailing club in your intended sailing grounds, it would eliminate the cost of the boat/trailer, storage cost, insurance, cost of fixing 'stuff' and paying off those pesky land owners! IMHO, join a club...cheaper and you'll probably learn and sail more in the process. :)
 

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Telstar 28
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I would second joining a sailing club... As a law student, you may find that you soon won't have the spare time to do as much sailing as you'd like, and owning a sailboat means you still have the responsibilities of taking care of and maintaining it... where being a member of a sailing club means that you'll have fewer responsibilities.

The only down side to not owning your own boat is that you won't be able to go out whenever you feel like it or for as long as you'd like... but given what most law students I know go through in their third year... being a club member is probably a better bet.
 

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Third vote for joining a sailing club. Much cheaper, and if they have a variety of boats, you'll have a better idea of what features you like when you do get your own.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I thought about a sailing club... my only concern is that it wont force me to do maintenance, which is something i wanna learn and enjoy doing. but thanks everyone for the advice
 

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Francophobe
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168 Posts
If you will be sailing with other people most of the time you may want to look at the Flying Scot, Thistle, Lightning, Buccaneer (Chrysler/Starwind/Gloucester/Nichols), Boston Whaler Harpoon 5.2, or similar boats. All can fit 4 or more and can be sailed alone in a pinch. If you are looking for something a little smaller there are a number of boats in the ~14 ft range (Catalina 14.2, Harpoon 4.6, Chrysler Mutineer, Flying Junior, etc)
If you are going to go out by yourself often there are some great small boats that are perfect (my pick would be the Laser) but these wouldn't fit your criteria to take along passengers.
On the multihull side there are always the Hobie's.
All of the boats I mention can be picked up for a low price as they have all been in production for multiple decades. What is low? You name the price and you will find examples, but you need to figure out how much time and money it will take you to get back into good sailing shape. It is safe to say that all of the above are available in good condition for <$5000 (some much less).
All can be towed by a mid-size sedan. You need to make sure you figure in the cost of adding a hitch to your vehicle. On the Flying Scot I bought this fall I had to spend more time and money getting the trailer road-worthy than getting the boat sea-worthy: bearings, tires, winch, coupler, etc.

Recurring costs (with my costs in Georgia): Trailer license plate fees ($12/yr), boat registration fees ($12/ 3 years), launch ramp fees ($30/yr - if you use the public launch ramps you don't have to pay to fix anyone's lawn)

Maintenance: Will depend somewhat on the boat but you need to figure you will regrease the trailer bearings every year (cheap if you do it yourself), sail care (varies but I budgeted ~100/yr), additional wear and tear on your tow vehicle (change the oil more often), varnish (keep up with the wood on the boat if there is any), etc

Of course there are all of the odds and ends that you will need, PFDs, anchor, lines, fenders, paddle, etc. If you want to race maybe membership in the appropriate one-design organization or local racing club. And don't forget storage, free if you can keep the boat at home, otherwise $$.
 

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Telstar 28
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Some sailing clubs have volunteers do the maintenance on their fleet... and if you're willing (ie dumb enough) to volunteer, I'm sure they'll be more than happy to have you do as much as you want. :)
I thought about a sailing club... my only concern is that it wont force me to do maintenance, which is something i wanna learn and enjoy doing. but thanks everyone for the advice
 
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