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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
My new boat, questions questions

Hi there folks, I've been a member here for a few years, but haven't had much to post other then to the crew wanted pages, but that's all changed due to my purchase of a 32ft J.T Taylor sloop. built in Vancouver in 1961.

She's planked with 3/4" fir over (I belive oak ribs) I will post some photos soon to give a better Idea as I don't know alot about sailboats yet ;)

The hull is very sound and in great shape, It was hauled out last year and I will be hauling it out very soon to do the bottom paint, and remove the old brokedown diesel that the previous owner with no idea what he was doing installed, as well as the shaft and prop. As I will be installing a new outboard to simplify things as well as to free up some much needed space.

I have a few questions that Im not too sure about due to the fact that i've never owned a sailboat before, though I am quite experienced with maintaining wooden boats and spent alot of time on the ocean running tugs.

the condition of my boat is as follows, the mast and rigging aren't in bad shape, though some of the lines will need to be replaced, as I said before I will be hauling out very soon to do bottom paint and zincs.
topside there are a few small leaks around a porthole or two and will not be much trouble to seal up an fix. the electrical system currently consists of a single 12v deep cycle connected to a single 1100gpm bilge pump. lol I know its pretty sad. also there is a fuel tank and water tank, with a working head, the diesel stove hasn't been installed yet but is a small dickinson in good shape.

so my plan for the electrical system is something like this:

two deep cycle 12v marine batteries, with 12volt led cabin lights and navigation lights, a new vhf, a small radar, gps with laptop running nobletec.

a small 2000 watt wisperlite gas genset.

a shorepower connection with a couple lights on the 110 system, as well as a low amperage battery charger to keep the 12v system up when at the dock.

the outboard I'm planning on installing also has an alternator to keep batteries up when offshore.

I'm also considering a small wind generator.

so the order I'm thinking of doing things in goes a little like this.

this winter -temporary sealing of topside
-haul out for bottom maintenece
-install 12v system
-select instruments
-get plumbing working (Im thinking just a simple foot pump for the sink)
- remove and refinish teak slats in v-berth and around bunks
- make templates of window surrounds and make new ones from
mahogany.

Spring - totally seal topside properly and paint to the waterline gotta get rid of ugly blue color
- purchase and install outboard
- purchase and install gps, vhf, radar etc

summer - learn to sail!!!

I welcome all input on my choice of ways and order of doing things, also if anyone could tell me if there is any market for used sails as I have a few spares.

many thanks and I look forward to hearing from yous

Will

also I'm a little unsure of where to mount nav lights on this littke guy, do I use a combo r/g on the bow or do they go on the sides of the house?
 

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Hi Will...good luck with your new lady! The only comment I have for you relates to "offshore" and outboards. Not a great combination in my opinion. 30+ feet tends to be inboard country and while an outboard CAN propel you in relatively flat water...it is not a good choice in any type of seas. You may wish to re-think this a bit.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the input on the outboard, I was still kind of thinking that one over, damn I guess Im in the market for a lil diesel or a gaspot..

I will post photos tommorow if weather permits.
 

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Retired and happy
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I couldn't agree more with Camaraderie about the power unit. There are all sorts of really good reasons for having inboard power on a boat of this size, especially as it will be really suited to serious offshore sailing.

You also might want to think about the plumbing. All the boats I have owned had hand or foot pumps for fresh water and I re-plumbed them with a pressurised system - much more convenient and flexible, Incidentally, I have just re-plumbed my Morgan 30 and did it using Pex piping and fittings from Lowes. It worked out really well and was very easy to do.

Sounds like a great boat - photos would be good....

Stuart
 

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"OLD SALT"
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Will, You might think about using 3 batteries. One for start two for house. Also your running lights consider the tri mast system R,G,W.
Hope this is some help. LOL
 

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Given that you're planning on running a laptop and radar, along with the VHF and lights, you will probably need a decent size battery bank, especially if you go the outboard route. Having a separate starting battery is probably a good idea as well.

Since you're starting from scratch, I'd also recommend using a Blue Sea Dual Circuit Plus series battery switch, since this will isolate the house electronics from the starting related voltage surge/drop, yet still allow you to combine batteries in an emergency. I'd also recommend using an echo charger to charge the starting bank and connecting all the charging sources to the house bank. The charge used starting the engine—outboard or inboard—is relatively insignificant compared to what the house bank will normally be required to supply. :)

I would highly recommend going with LED-based navigation lights. The least expensive way to do this on a boat the size of yours is to get the AquaSignal 25 or 40 series fixtures and then replace the bulbs with LED bulbs from Dr. LED that are fixture certified by the USCG. If you're planning on going off-shore, you will want both deck level and a mast-top tricolor navigation lights. The tricolor is far more visible off-shore, where the deck-level lights are far better in harbor/coastal situations.

For the deck level lights, you can get away with a bow-mounted bi-color and stern light, and that reduces the need for having two separate fixtures, simplifying your wiring as well. You'll also need a masthead steaming light for when you're motoring.
 

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Are you installing the genset inside? If so I'd go with diesel, especially if you reconsider going with diesel as your main propulsion. If the boat is already plumbed for diesel then it will be easier to keep that.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Pics

Heres a few pics to give you a better idea of the boat, keep in mind, I hate that blue color too, and it will be properly painted as soon as I get the weather.

Again I really appreciate all input and Im pretty sure that after speaking with the previous owner I will be keeping the diesel and first trying a prop replacement and failing that replacing the reduction gear.

The information with regards to nav lights, the advice makes sense and I'll probably go with mast r/g/w led, and with a combination on the bow.

as far as a genset goes Im going to look into some very small diesels.

let me know what you guys think of the photos.

cheers

will
 

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midlife crisis member
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Cool. The blue would not be so bad if the whole boat wasn't the one colour. Perhaps a different colour on the deck would make the blue look ok. Did you take the pics? I think I see some roller trays on the dock with the blue paint in them. Also, I am not sure I like the way the mainsail is stored. :)

Good luck with the project. I like the brightwork. Will look great once restored.

Eric
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Allthumbs, but I think its effin terrible, I'm planning to go with a deep navy blue bottom paint to the waterline, and then the top of the house, deck and hull white, theres some fine detailed lines carved into the sides of the hull just below deck level that I may highlight in blue as well, I think with that and the brightwork all sanded up, sealed and refinished it will look amazing. yeah it looks to me like the previous owner got more paint on the dock then he did on the boat, and I guess I inhereted his mess with the boat :) I also plan on adding a mahogany cap on the deck up under the forestay coming back a few feet to where the little bow rail ends.

ahhh.. i can't wait for some good weather again, sadly here on vancouver island, it won't be epoxying and painting weather again for quite a while now...

cheers

Will
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
So I think my electrical system will be my first priority, Im thinking that 2 12v deep cycle batteries for the house should be plenty, with one 12v starting battery connected with an echo charger, as well as a 110v trickle charger to keep the batteries up while on shore, or to be plugged into small genset.

I realize my diagram is rough, but could anyone let me know if they see any major flaws.

cheers

Will
 

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Willdadd-

You really want the alternator and the trickle charger connected to the HOUSE BANK, not the STARTING BANK. The house bank has much more of a load on it and echo charging the house bank is a bad idea. The starting bank requires relatively little charging after a start and replenishing that small amount via an echo charger makes sense.

Also, when wiring multiple things to a single breaker, like the navigation lights, you should probably run a line from the DC panel breaker to a fused switch panel, like the one pictured below, and use fuses sized for each of the individual nav light fixtures, rather than relying on the DC breaker which is probably very much oversized for any of the individual lights-and might cause a fire or other problems if you should have a short in one of the individual light circuits. This also makes the individual fixtures easier to troubleshoot and allows you to select various running light combinations as needed-for instance you can have both a masthead tricolor and deck-level running lights installed and select one or the other depending on where you're sailing.

 

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Of course, the fuse is there to protect the wire, not the fixture, so as long as the fuse is sized correctly to protect the wires, you can run multiple fixtures on one fuse safely.
 

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Yes, but in his drawing, he's got the mast nav lights (tricolor and steaming light), deck level nav lights (bicolor, stern presumably), and anchor light all rigged to the same breaker. Without the switch panel, he'll be out of compliance whenever he turns on that breaker.

And you're assuming that the wiring was sized for the breaker and not for the fixture. If that is not the case, and the wiring was sized for the fixture, the single breaker for multiple light fixtures is going to be a hazard.
 

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I've found that on a lot of the PO wiring I've dealt with, they went with the minimum gauge wiring they could get away with and often it was rated for far less than the breaker given the run distances. On my boat, the wiring is a bit heavier than what the breaker would generally require, but the individual fixtures are separately fused anyways. :)
True. The wiring should always be sized for the breaker. If it isn't, it's not safe unless there is another fuse inline.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Sorry for the confusion guys, as I said my diagram skills suck, my intention is to have individual switch/treakers on a panel for each light, I just figured it'd be a given and it was a pain in the ass to draw ;)
 
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