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One of None
Hunter 34
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Bet you don't have a transatlantic 馃ぃ馃ぃ馃ぃ anchor line! (200'+)

Looking in the now cleaned up anchor Locker is that diamond plate for a anchor windless? Seems kind of low.

There is no way in heaven 2 Anchor lines are going to fit in the anchor Locker so the secondary will have to go into the aft lazarette.
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Best way to get rid of the mildew and smell them and hang them up on the outside let the sun do the worwwk, it was still a hard morning's work! I'm done for the day!
 
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One of None
Hunter 34
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Actually the secondary danforth has notches to rest in the locker. as the primary bruce anchor is out on the bow roller I'll see next week after the lines are clean and dry if they'll fit in there, not to mention they're undersize they should be 5/8" not1/2"
 

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Funny you should bring the "TransAtlantic anchoring" thing up. The most common question I was asked by those on the dock as we prepared for an ocean crossing was, "Do you anchor every night?" I explain that since anchoring requires roughly three times the depth of the water, and most of the ocean is about 5 miles deep, we carry about 15 miles of chain aboard. As they look at my 1/2" chain, I love the look of consternation on their faces as they try to figure out where we stow it all.
 

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Unless there's 100' of chain in front of it, 200' of rope isn't excessive even for the Chesapeake. Although you might not do it that often, it's not entirely unusual to anchor in 15' of water here. If you add the height of the bow above the water you're at 10:1 scope in a 15' deep anchorage. 10:1 is not at all unreasonable for an all-rope rode, especially when bad weather and shifting winds are expected.
 

One of None
Hunter 34
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, I know was just trying to be funny again :rolleyes:
 
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There was a thread on a French website earlier this year about a dismasted boat that got a tow from another sailboat. Their problem was that neither of them had a long enough line (jibsheets/spinnaker sheets) to use for a towline in the rough conditions they were experiencing, and their lines kept chafing through or breaking. Chain does not seem to fit the bill in a towing scenario. Your 200' anchor line seems like it would be just the thing in such a situation.
 

One of None
Hunter 34
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Again I was trying to be funny but between the two of them I have almost 500 feet and they both have chain around 20 ft but I didn't really measure the chain
 

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We have a similar setup. Thinking about getting a windlass, but do we anchor enough to really need one? Is getting a chain/rope gypsy worth the hassle for just a boatlength of chain on a nylon rode? Definitely not a third-world problem.
 

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For a cruising boat, I really don't see that as way too much, at least not for one of the rodes. Kedging comes to mind. Heck, just rock climbing I routinely carried 120 meters (390 feet) on big routes. You don't need it... until you need it. But cut it off if you like, and you'll probably never miss it.
 

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We have a similar setup. Thinking about getting a windlass, but do we anchor enough to really need one? Is getting a chain/rope gypsy worth the hassle for just a boatlength of chain on a nylon rode? Definitely not a third-world problem.
I got the electric windlass, foot switches and cockpit switches when I prepared to live aboard down in the Islands. You anchor every night that you are not underway. When I returned I had the windlass and chose to anchor when I can as opposed to used a mooring. My anchoring technique is quite good and I don't drag. You can't anchor among moored boats because moorings use short scope and swing differently. And you have to clean your chain and anchor as opposed to tossing a mooring line overboard.
 

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You can't anchor among moored boats because moorings use short scope and swing differently. And you have to clean your chain and anchor as opposed to tossing a mooring line overboard.
That's a good point about swing radius. If someone was in an anchorage on a 10:1 scope because they had insufficient chain, would they not be more likely to have issues if boats around them are all on much shorter scopes in a busy anchorage?

On our last boat we had 200ft rode and 30ft chain and an aluminum Fortress anchor. We rarely anchored. That is the type of setup you have on a race boat to keep the weight down and still meet the requirements to have an anchor on board. It is good as a "lunch hook" but not much more, at least around here where the water is deep.

I would think that anyone planning to do any serious anchoring should have more chain than just a boat length, but of course then you would also want a windlass so you don't have to hand bomb all that chain!

Maybe it is different in regions where you are always in skinny water?

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