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arrgh!
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I guess it could be called a 'bucket list' but for me it is a 'dream adventure'

If every thing lines up in the next 10 years, what I would like to do is sail up to a pocket cruiser (sail up == start with a dinghy and sail it until I am ready to move up to a 22-28 foot boat).

Then in three years or so, take the summers to cruise the great lakes. I live in the Adirondacks but like to work my way a lake at a time, working From Lake Ontario to Superior ... who knows.. but it is fun to think about.

Does anyone else have an adventure in mind?

(I know a lot of you are currently living the dream...)

Edit: here is a thread for me: http://www.sailnet.com/forums/cruising-liveaboard-forum/551-great-lakes-sailing.html
 

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arrgh!
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
An entirely doable "dream" titustiger27. Adventure is everywhere, but the upper Great Lakes hold a lifetime of thrills and discovery. Good luck.
What I was thinking of doing is each year leave the boat at a marina and trave back to my car via Amtrak...

While just looking at the lakes.. I was thinking maybe it would be easier to go west to east... any thoughts?
 

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Old soul
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What I was thinking of doing is each year leave the boat at a marina and trave back to my car via Amtrak...

While just looking at the lakes.. I was thinking maybe it would be easier to go west to east... any thoughts?
The prevailing winds tend to be westerlies or northwesterlies so in that sense it makes more sense to go west to east. That said, the continental winds are so variable, and often more influenced by local geography, that I wouldn't make this the deciding factor. If you're looking to travel in a small boat, you should carefully chart out your routes, and get as much local knowledge as possible. You may also be more driven by marinas locations and your own logistics. I assume you're going to have a trailer-sailor, so you're going to have to move your trailer along.

Do start in the lower (smaller) lakes first, and learn how to sail, and more importantly to cruise (wilderness skills, anchoring, weather reading, cooking, maintenance, etc.). I personally would not take a 22-footer on an extended cruise. Too small, not just for possible sea conditions, but just for basic living space. I'd look at a 25' as the minimum.
 

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69' Coronado 25
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My adventure is to get my boat out of its slip...LOL, I am working a Coronado 25 and I am almost ready to cast off the dock lines and do a shake down sail, by summer I should be ready for weekend trips to Catalina Island.
 
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arrgh!
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1,816 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The prevailing winds tend to be westerlies or northwesterlies so in that sense it makes more sense to go west to east. That said, the continental winds are so variable, and often more influenced by local geography, that I wouldn't make this the deciding factor. If you're looking to travel in a small boat, you should carefully chart out your routes, and get as much local knowledge as possible. You may also be more driven by marinas locations and your own logistics. I assume you're going to have a trailer-sailor, so you're going to have to move your trailer along.

Do start in the lower (smaller) lakes first, and learn how to sail, and more importantly to cruise (wilderness skills, anchoring, weather reading, cooking, maintenance, etc.). I personally would not take a 22-footer on an extended cruise. Too small, not just for possible sea conditions, but just for basic living space. I'd look at a 25' as the minimum.
Thanks... I was also thinking the lakes flow that way as well... however low the current is
 

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Old soul
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Thanks... I was also thinking the lakes flow that way as well... however low the current is
No currents or tides. Can see some large seiches, but no real relevance for sailing. The only currents you'll care about are in the connecting rivers. St. Mary's River definitely has a current, not sure about the St. Clair.
 

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Old soul
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There are currents.
we noticed some against us heading south along the Mi shore of Lake Mi.
St Clair river and Detroit river both run around 3 knots.
Your answer sent me searching Xort. I vaguely recalled hearing the Great Lakes did have regular surface currents. Took some searching, but found relatively current research that finds there can be wind-driven currents up to .5 m/s (~1 knot). Mid-Michigan is noted as one place where you can find this at times.

Here's a cool visualization of "Great Lakes Depth-Averaged Currents Map"
Great Lakes Currents Map

Not sure I've ever felt the impacts of these currents -- I guess I don't pay enough attention to the speedo ;).
 

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Two years ago I had a dream to outfit a boat and take my family cruising. We are currently in Islamoralda Florida in the keys after sailing it down the coast from Maryland and have been living aboard since early summer. Dare to dream, and then make those realities!
 
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