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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Savusavu-Fiji, is a small isolated town, with a few shops and restaurants, small harbor and beach. When busy, visitors who are also liveaboards, anchor in the harbor. The beach is free to leave your dinghy; but, should you?

As expensive as commercial dinghys are, I certainly wouldn't, especially when the economy is depressed. A 30ft plywood fishing boat here, can fetch $35,000 usd. In Brisbane, the same boat can be had for $10,000 aud, with motor.

Personally, I'd never buy a boat in Fiji. You really have to build here. Also, getting anything shipped here, is unreasonably expensive. Basically, if you don't want to get fleeced, then a found-object, or diy approach is highly "recommended."

Fiji needs a "container-ship" merchant marine. Another solution would be to trade fishing privileges to the Chinese, who already fish illegally in Fijian waters, in exchange for a "deep" discount, delivering Chinese manufactured goods. Alibaba to the rescue! To go even further, with this vision, they could even designate one of their "uninhabited" islands as "shopping-island" and possibly get the Chinese to help with that project. If realized the Australians, who already have a big stake in Fiji, would likely want a piece of that action.

Having worked in electronic and machine manufacturing industries, I have many ideas wrt how they can build a manufacturing infrastructure here; but, they'll have to hire me, if they want my input there.

Back to the anchored yacht. My wife and I (theoretical and "wanted") aren't swimming or wading ashore. She doesn't have to get her feet wet, not ever. It turns-out that the natives, in Savusavu have a solution for that. They tie a bunch of long bamboo poles together, with rope and transport you, your wife, kids, luggage, etc., on-the-raft. The beach is free for them as well and this solves the theft problem. These rafts have so little value, that no one would ever bother to steal one.

Problem solved, you and your family get to shore, bags and all; and, your wife's fresh pedicure doesn't get wrecked. Happy ending at the hotel and bar (I only drink ocassionlly now)

I once heard it quoted, that in the military, the right amount of force is the "least" amount. This seems to hold true, for any resource intensive endeavor. The raft solution is "exactly," the right amount of force and no more.

Finally, the Western
business-world teaches us to always think big. That defeats a lot of would-be entrepreneurs. The Fijian natives won, by thinking small and cheap, kept my wife's feet dry and me in possession of my dinghy.

I would say, well done.

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139786
 

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You do realise don't you that this sounds somewhat condecending towards the fijian people.
 

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The idea of seeking Chinese 'help' doesn't seem like such a good one. They'll help themselves and that's really about it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The idea of seeking Chinese 'help' doesn't seem like such a good one. They'll help themselves and that's really about it.
Hi, Lanealoha

Thanks for the reply.

I don't know where you're from; however, I do understand your skepticism. Here in Fiji, the Chinese are already helping themselves, to our fishing waters. I only meant to suggest that we actually get "something" for it. We are also very much like the rest of the pacific islands, in that our economy is very much dependent on tourism and has "no" manufacturing and little commercial shipping infrastructure. There are relatively efficient methods for solving both of these problems. My suggestions were simply the least restrictive place to start a discussion, which is very much needed.

Cheers
 
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