SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 52 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
hi,

i feel like u are out there somewhere. im in the caribbean and open to sail wherever if we meet and connect. we can help each other out. i can clean naturally and prepare raw or cooked veganic meals and u can teach me the ropes of sailing.

i havent sailed yet but was a varsity athlete and enjoy peace and quiet and working hard for a good cause.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Hi VeganSailing,

I am vegetarian and my partner (Chuck) is vegan. It seems there aren't many other vegetarian/vegan sailors like us out there. We don't have our own boat yet, but we're looking. We're currently members of a sailing club and honing our skills out on San Francisco Bay and plan to begin circumnavigation in 3 years.

Where are you currently located? We love the idea of crewing with other plant-eaters like us. I wish you the best of luck finding your vegan mate. Believe me, they are out there! Don't give up. :)

Mary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
I just learned the hard way that I can't PM you until I have 15 posts on this forum. Wow!

Our email address is the same as our username here on the forum, with a dot . between the words novaturient and spirit, at gmail dot com. Hope to hear from you! :)

Mary
 

·
Administrator
Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
Joined
·
9,359 Posts
I am surprised that you have not seen a many vegetarians living the cruising life. I have been a vegetarian since 1967 and have been amazed at the number of us Veg's of one type or another that I run into in recent years. I more rarely run into people who are full blown vegans or 'raw' and most of them are considerably younger than I am. So I would think that you should not have a hard time finding one in the cruising life. As it turns out a lot of cruisers of the 'go now-go simple' school go vegetarian or at least pescatarian during passages to avoid needing refrigeration.

Good grazing
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,761 Posts
It would be interesting to learn how a vegan can do a 20 to 30 day crossing on fresh produce, without a walk in fridge. I've not been able to keep much beyond cabbage for any length of time. We even have trouble managing fresh fruit and veges on a 7 day charter in the Grenadines, if the venders on the small islands can't supply them, which is often the case. We did one charter recently where we couldn't buy limes anywhere in Grenada all the way to St. Lucia. A gin and tonic just ain't a gin and tonic w/o fresh limes! It's a dastardly plot, I just know it is.
 

·
Chastened
Joined
·
4,862 Posts
It would be interesting to learn how a vegan can do a 20 to 30 day crossing on fresh produce, without a walk in fridge. I've not been able to keep much beyond cabbage for any length of time. We even have trouble managing fresh fruit and veges on a 7 day charter in the Grenadines, if the venders on the small islands can't supply them, which is often the case. We did one charter recently where we couldn't buy limes anywhere in Grenada all the way to St. Lucia. A gin and tonic just ain't a gin and tonic w/o fresh limes! It's a dastardly plot, I just know it is.
I'm going to hazard a guess that you already know all the tricks about storing certain veg away from certain other fruit or veg or with certain other fruit or veg in order to extend the shelf life, correct?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #12
It would be interesting to learn how a vegan can do a 20 to 30 day crossing on fresh produce, without a walk in fridge. I've not been able to keep much beyond cabbage for any length of time. We even have trouble managing fresh fruit and veges on a 7 day charter in the Grenadines, if the venders on the small islands can't supply them, which is often the case. We did one charter recently where we couldn't buy limes anywhere in Grenada all the way to St. Lucia. A gin and tonic just ain't a gin and tonic w/o fresh limes! It's a dastardly plot, I just know it is.
well things like cashews and almonds have lots of protein and store fine. dont most boatshave solar panels and fridges tho?
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,761 Posts
well things like cashews and almonds have lots of protein and store fine. dont most boatshave solar panels and fridges tho?
Nuts are hardly 'fresh produce' and probably not a very well rounded diet for someone expending the kind of energy long ocean crossings require.
Most boat fridges can hardly hold a week's worth of produce, hence the 'walk in' fridge comment. Keep in mind that refrigeration is the most perishable system aboard a cruising boat, especially at sea, and therefore should not be used as one's only source of food conservation.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Nuts are hardly 'fresh produce' and probably not a very well rounded diet for someone expending the kind of energy long ocean crossings require.
Most boat fridges can hardly hold a week's worth of produce, hence the 'walk in' fridge comment. Keep in mind that refrigeration is the most perishable system aboard a cruising boat, especially at sea, and therefore should not be used as one's only source of food conservation.
i know nuts arent produce lol , my point is there is food u can use that doesnt need refrigeration. coconut oil as well, some fruit can last a week. how is a solar powered fridge perishable? not sure i follow.
 

·
Administrator
Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
Joined
·
9,359 Posts
Nuts are hardly 'fresh produce' and probably not a very well rounded diet for someone expending the kind of energy long ocean crossings require.
Most boat fridges can hardly hold a week's worth of produce, hence the 'walk in' fridge comment. Keep in mind that refrigeration is the most perishable system aboard a cruising boat, especially at sea, and therefore should not be used as one's only source of food conservation.
Anne Hill's book had two very useful appendixes which dealt with storing food. They were essentially pescatarian during longer passages. They mostly depended on a mix of dried vegitables and fruits supplemented by fresh veg's bought in port for as long as they lasted. I have known a number of folks who did similar things including one couple who did their own canning and solar drying of vegetables when they could get produce in various ports, and would use these to supplement their dried foods underway.

To be clear, even though I have been a vegetarian for most of my life, I don't necessary advocate being a vegetarian unless someone chooses to be on on their own. In that case, that person gets to define what works for them, even if it might not work for everyone or anyone else.

I always figured that I would not use refrigeration on longer passages. Now that wind generators, solar collectors, energy management systems, and refrigeration have gotten more efficient, I might consider changing that position.

Jeff
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,761 Posts
Perishable is the sense that if a system is going to break on a passage it will be the fridge. They seem to be the most problematic system on board a boat (power or sail)
Perishable and often irreparable at sea.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,333 Posts
It is possible to have a reasonable well balanced diet on a variety of dried vegetable, dried fruit, dried mushrooms, dried seaweed, vegetable oils, nuts, grains, pulses, and root vegetable which store quite well in dry peat moss.

A weeds and seeds diet with a good collection of herbs and spices can be a joy, but I also like fresh fish, milk, cheeses and eggs.
 

·
Deep Blue Crush
Elan Impression 394
Joined
·
176 Posts
Anne Hill's book had two very useful appendixes which dealt with storing food. They were essentially pescatarian during longer passages. They mostly depended on a mix of dried vegitables and fruits supplemented by fresh veg's bought in port for as long as they lasted. I have known a number of folks who did similar things including one couple who did their own canning and solar drying of vegetables when they could get produce in various ports, and would use these to supplement their dried foods underway.

To be clear, even though I have been a vegetarian for most of my life, I don't necessary advocate being a vegetarian unless someone chooses to be on on their own. In that case, that person gets to define what works for them, even if it might not work for everyone or anyone else.

I always figured that I would not use refrigeration on longer passages. Now that wind generators, solar collectors, energy management systems, and refrigeration have gotten more efficient, I might consider changing that position.

Jeff
Interesting what you just wrote. I am vegan although rarely or when not having a choice (ie too much travelling messes up preparation for a healthy and complex vegan meal) I can slip into vegetarianism. I tend to mostly go down the vegan macrobiotic way, but then change every now and then, ie for a while incorporating plenty of complex smoothies and like to experience vegan cooking overall, making cheese from cashew etc. Its not hard, but it requires a different settings then a typical "kitchen".
I just removed the whole old galley on my boat and refitting it entirely to actually fit more my simple vegan lifestyle, but I am a little anxious wondering if I can pull off full veganism on a liveaboard on longer routes. I dont want an oven and dont want a fridge either.

Do you find it challenging, or certain areas that you find challenging? If you have done it for such a long time you must have quite a good experience with it.
 
1 - 20 of 52 Posts
Top