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Hey people. Am Curious as to how many Navigators we have here? Their Sextants and if they have a License?

I have a C Plath sextant, bought it 2nd hand but from a reliable dealer.
The License is: 1600 ton Master / 2nd Mate Unlimited Tonnage.
along with ARPA, GMDSS, STCW and Able Seaman.


That is a start on this thread. NOW How about you?
 

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ancient mariner
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sextant is a Heath navigation , london, uk i let my license expire in october. with the transportation workers ID card, drug test $50 ( i never used drugs ) physical , etc i figured it would cost close to $500 so i let it expire . my license was 100Ton near costal for auxiliary sailing vessels
 

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the pointy end is the bow
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One of those $80-100 Davis Plastic sextants used for CN practice and occasional fixes with a three armed protractor. No licenses but part of the job is running boats in local coastal waters and a major nearby river and I'm often out when the weather is nasty, dark, or foggy. Fog gives me a neck ache almost every time.
 

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No licence, but I have the Canadian PCOC since '99 (when it came out), the Toronto Harbour Licence (involves essentially maneuvering a small outboard skiff around a marina and identifying some basic COLREGS stuff), and have passed the following courses: the 12-class "Boating" course from CPS, the 4 week "Coastal Pilotage" course from CPS, and a six-class Celestial Navigation course offered by a former CPS instructor at the club.

I also have an Astra IIIB sextant, a Freiberger Yacht sextant and a Davis 25 for the kid. I carry a hand-held compass and an old optical rangefinder, as well as a Trimble GPS, two Magellan handhelds and a Raymarine late '90s chartplotter. I have a Ritchie Globemaster with compensators at the helm and a KVH gyro compass. I also carry all local charts, although I tend to rely on Notice to Mariners over the radio as Lake Ontario doesn't have a lot of news in this regard.

Lastly, my watch has a recording barometer and a compass, but I have to get it five and a half feet off the steel deck before it will read properly! So that's a load of info and backup.

I would like to take the RYA Yachtmaster and then the Oceanmaster courses in Britain (I hold dual citizenship and thus it would be a matter of getting there and affording the time and cost of a few weeks in a B&B) because they seem to be the most respected qualifications around the world short of the actual "tickets" professional mariners or naval personnel can acquire.

The "six-pack" offered by the U.S. Coast Guard is considered pretty basic and Caribbean-oriented by non-U.S. sailors, as it is no more difficult than the basic licensing you need in most countries to sail at all. Alex is pretty up on this sort of thing. Of course, the vast majority of Canadian and U.S. sailors have little or no formal training at all, as the PCOC in Canada is a bit of a joke, but fractionally better than nothing, I suppose.

One point: The USCG will only certify U.S. citizens, which is fine, I suppose, but I would take the six-pack if I could, just to have SOMETHING. Canadian Power Squadron courses are quite similar, but they are NOT "official qualifications". I would have to go to "Canadian Sailor School" for that, and I'm a bit old to consider a career on lake freighters....
 

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The "six-pack" offered by the U.S. Coast Guard is considered pretty basic and Caribbean-oriented by non-U.S. sailors, as it is no more difficult than the basic licensing you need in most countries to sail at all.

One point: The USCG will only certify U.S. citizens, which is fine, I suppose, but I would take the six-pack if I could, just to have SOMETHING.

The 6 pack can be held by a non-citizen. It is the masters that you have to be a citizen to hold.

Please, sit for the 6-pack test, I think you find it more then "pretty basic."
 

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The 6 pack can be held by a non-citizen. It is the masters that you have to be a citizen to hold.

Please, sit for the 6-pack test, I think you find it more then "pretty basic."
I'll check that out, but it looked less daunting than the RYA courses. Thanks for the info.

EDIT: Bubb, this site states explicitly that only U.S. citizens need apply.

Six Pack Captain's Course

I see the difference between "Captain" and "Master", and the classes of Inland, Great Lakes and Coastal, but I'm looking for something more along the Yachtmaster line anyway. As you can see here, you take the Yachtmaster course after a large number of sea miles and days

RYA Sailing School - Fastrack Yachtmaster Courses, Gibraltar and Spain.

and the reason is that they appear to consolidate, verify and if necessary, expand and correct the knowledge that didn't get you killed getting the the U.K. Of course, you can just sit the exam if you think you already know it all, and qualify without further training. That's probably why Yachtmaster/Oceanmaster carry weight with insurance companies.
 

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Tamaya
Master, Oceans, Steam or Motor, Any Gross Tons
Radar Observer
 

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from the CG web site

<DIR>
Proof of Citizenship and Any Legal Name Change:​
To obtain a Merchant Mariner’s Document (MMD), you must be a U.S. citizen or an alien "lawfully admitted to the U.S. for permanent residence." To obtain a license, you must be a U.S. citizen except non-citizens may apply for an Operator of Uninspected Passenger Vessels (OUPV) license limited to undocumented vessels less than 5 net tons. All original license and document transactions must provide acceptable proof of nationality (i.e., original passport, birth certificate, or baptismal certificate). All subsequent applications by non-U.S. citizens (i.e., renewal, upgrade, duplicate) must provide proof of nationality and immigration status. All original license and document transactions must provide an original social security card. If your name has changed due to marriage, divorce, or a legal name change, you must provide documentation of your name change (for example, a marriage certificate, divorce decree, or judicial name change) and your current legal name.

&#56256;&#56390;​
Verification of Sea Service: Several options are available for the mariner

</DIR>
 

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Valiente, I am not sure where you get your ideas, but in order to get a 6-pack you must have 360 days of sea time. Yes, i am aware RYA use mileage and not days at sea as their standard. I believe it is 2500 miles. At 5 knots x 20 hours a day =100 a day or 2500 miles in 25 days.

The fine print in the 6 pack is a day at sea is considered a watch of at least 4 hours. 360 days x 4 hours a day=1440 hours x 5 knots = 7200 miles.

Your statement about the insurance Co's favor the RYA. This may be true in Toronto, But I never had any problem getting insurance for any of 80+ deliveries i have made, including the islands and Nova Scotia. If your are going to run a charter boat in the US, The RYA will not do you any good as it is not recognized by the Coast Guard and therefore you would not be properly licensed and could not get insurance at all.
 

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I think we are talking at cross-purposes here.

Running a charter boat isn't the goal, getting the sort of certification that gets you credibility as a private yacht skipper in distant harbours and insurance discounts for those places that demand to see insurance is. The OUPV (the "Captain", not the "Master" ticket, which seems more "pro") appears to be like Step 1 in running a sailing B&B on the side, i.e. a charter boat going, say, from Miami to Grand Bahama.

I am just talking about offshore stuff. In Toronto, you can put boat insurance as a rider on car or house insurance. It is only recently that you needed a Pleasure Craft Operator's Card, which is a challenge test you can sit for $20 at a boat show and is extremely basic: the G1 very restricted car licence is more difficult to get, and almost anyone can get that.

A delivery skipper would gravitate, I suppose, to the "master's" version of the OUPV, because that's orientated toward a tonnage/seamanship requirement that seems to preclude extra crew. Or so it seems. I would imagine that if you ran, even as a sideline, a yacht delivery service, your clients and your insurers would want a 100-ton ticket.

It is a mystery to me, however, how the individual sailor is supposed to acquire this "sea time", as who actually counter-signs your 360 log sheets showing you sailing in circles in four-hour stretches? I must already have this, and unlike a lot of recreational sailors, I keep a dated log, but it's just me scribbling in a binder, if you know what I mean. The only "sea hours" I could conceivably get counter-signed would be the two days in 2007 I spent crewing for Alex in Portugal...which is maybe 26 hours in total, of maybe which I spent three alone on the helm in what I would consider "a watch"...

Show up in Britain on the other hand on your own keel and at least they KNOW you've done 25 or so straight days of 24-hour sailing...
 

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Val if I may, The USCG licenses are commercial licenses meaning you must have one in the US order to take fare paying passengers on board. A delivery skipper who is hiring crew and not selling spots on the boat does not need a USCG license.

Canada is set up the RYA system and we in the US, like most things, have our own system that does not correlate to anything else in the world.
 

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the pointy end is the bow
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I've heard that the sea time requirement for the 6-pak is self certifying.


Most recreational boaters do not maintain log books, so the Sea Service forms which are included in the USCG application package must be filled in using the honor system. This form consists of twelve boxes, one for each month of the year. Starting with the most recent year, you fill in the number of days you can best recall being on the water and then go backward in time to the age of 13 years old, or until the sea time requirements have been met. This time is then supported by proof of ownership of the vessel, if you are claiming time on your own boat. If you claim time on someone else's boat, then they must sign your sea service form.

Proof of ownership may include such documents as: registration papers, documentation papers, insurance papers, or bills of sale. Pictures are not considered acceptable.

To claim your time the vessels should be greater than sixteen (16) feet in length.
BOATWISE - CAPTAINS LICENSE CLASSES, 6 PAK, OUPV AND COAST GUARD LICENSES
 

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Here is a link to the sea service form. Yes, if you are the owner you can certify yourself. However, if you are not the owner it is my understanding the Coast Guard will only accept a sign off by another licensed person. As it was explain to me years ago, if you sign for yourself and it is determined you did not have the skills or time you could be charged with a crime. This information would come out during a accident investigation.

http://www.boatwise.com/pdf/719s.pdf
 

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the pointy end is the bow
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Here is a link to the sea service form. Yes, if you are the owner you can certify yourself. However, if you are not the owner it is my understanding the Coast Guard will only accept a sign off by another licensed person. As it was explain to me years ago, if you sign for yourself and it is determined you did not have the skills or time you could be charged with a crime. This information would come out during a accident investigation.

http://www.boatwise.com/pdf/719s.pdf
Thanks for posting the form. I didn't notice a requirement that the owner of a vessel you're serving on needs to be licensed, just that the owner of the vessel certifies that you put in the time. I'm interested because I plan on getting my 6-pak before we shove off and I've wondered myself how to document my sea time.
 

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I agree with you, it is not clear. I have had explained to me, if you notice the box where they ask the owner to sign, it reads Owner, operator or Master. This refers to the owner having either a 6 pack (oupv) or master license. This was a big debate in my licensing class, However the instructor who was ex-CG was very adamant about it. I know it does not make sense if if you own the boat you can sign off for yourself, hence the grounds for the debate. If any one knows different I would be interested myself.
 

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Discussion Starter #18
I think we strayed off course here a bit!! :rant:
But it is still good info for the people who need it.:p

What brand is your Sextant? And do you have a license??
Just to bring us back to the Original topic at hand. :D
 

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Carl Plath, Cassens & Plath, and Tamaya sextants. Used to teach Celestial Nav.

Current 100 ton Masters, Near Shore, Steam, Motor, or Aux Sail

TWIC and all the garbage :)
 

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Roadkillibus Texanis
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Sextant training is on the list. I'll go the ASA route since I don't need to make a living on the water . . . although it would be a dream. I envy you guy’s who do.

Current Licenses:
Master Scuba
Texas Class C Drivers License
Conceal and Carry
License to Chill (Margarita endorsement)
 
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