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Hello All,

Way back when I was young lad learning to sail at Mystic they taught us a knot that I would very much like to remember now. It was a form of a hitch(I think) and iirc it was referred to as a locking hitch. Now its important to note that I am not 100% sure of the name. The knot was used by sailors to raise large objects such as a yard. Another important factor is that I don't mean raise and lower while its properly attached, imagine them having to replace a yard and needing to raise said replacement from the deck. When I learned this knot it was said that the knot was used because it self tightened under load and therefor would not slip and could even be used on other lines, it was also easily untied.

Any ideas? Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Brad
 

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After browsing that website I found it. Its a rolling hitch but I don't remember it being called that.

Thanks for the help folks!
 

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Constrictor hitch?

Constrictor Knot | How to tie the Constrictor Knot (Twisting Method) | Boating Knots..

I recall this one when discussing trying to deal with an override on a winch.. use this knot to take the load to another point and free the override...
What you described here is exactly what the OP was looking for, but it was the wrong knot...
You use a rolling hitch to take the load from a line and free an override... ;)

You can also use this rolling hitch to climb the mast by using two of them with a sling on the other end, tie those two sling on a halyard, step into the slings and then move one up while you have your weight on the other, step on the higher one and move the other, rinse and repeat...
 

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A rolling hitch is typically used to tie one line to the middle of another. I consider it one of the mandatory knots one must know. They can be used to take the load off a sheet when you have an override on a winch. More frequently, I use one to make a snubber for the anchor rode/chain.

Glad you found it.
 

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Might be a variation of rolling hitch called Magnus Hitch. Read the free book here.

"The Magnus Hitch(Fig. 49) is a method frequently used on shipboard for holding spars"

---"Knots, Splices And Rope Work", A. Hyatt Verrill

<img width="350" height="344" src="http://www.gutenberg.org/files/13510/13510-h/images/fig49.gif">

A rolling hitch is the right hitch to use when hauling a new topmast out of the forest.
Not a 'timber' hitch? :)

<img src="http://www.gutenberg.org/files/13510/13510-h/images/fig39.gif">

---ibid
 

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For all these hitches, I have always used a clove hitch. I have never been at a loss for a knot or had a knot failure with only 5 knots: half hitches, clove hitch, bolin, figure 8, and what I think is called the thomas knot which is used to join two ends of a line together. I know other knots just don't ever seem to ever need them. Then there is fishing where I use an improved blood knot.
 

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... I consider it one of the mandatory knots one must know. ...
true!
on the webpage you posted, they are recommending the following knots and i cannot agree more with them:
We would love it if every person we took sailing knew how to tie a mooring line using a Round Turn with Two Half-Hitches. They often don't! The following are also on our essential list: Bowline, Cleat Hitch, Clove Hitch, Figure Eight Knot, Rolling Hitch, Sheet Bend, and Square (Reef) Knot.
 

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Interesting. The magnus hitch looks like a rolling hitch with the finishing half hitch done in the opposite direction. Not sure I can readily tell if there is any practical difference between the two.

As an anchor snubber, btw, I do three round turns in front and two half hitches behind the pulling line. Making them with the line constantly moving in the same direction seems easiest.
 

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ok, thomas knot does not seem to be the right name. I would look it up in my mountaineering book but my son took it to read. Someone might know the knot here. It is used by mountain climbers to put a loop into the center of a climbing rope which they also use the figure 8 for. It is also useful to connect two lines together and is equally secure regardless which of the four ends has the load on it.
 

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ok, thomas knot does not seem to be the right name. I would look it up in my mountaineering book but my son took it to read. Someone might know the knot here. It is used by mountain climbers to put a loop into the center of a climbing rope which they also use the figure 8 for. It is also useful to connect two lines together and is equally secure regardless which of the four ends has the load on it.

Lineman's Loop/Butterfly Loop puts a loop anywhere without using the ends.

Butterfly loop - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Strait Bend/Butterfly Bend, structurally related to Lineman's Loop, joins 2 ends.

Butterfly bend - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

---find them in Chapman Knots for Boaters:Amazon:[email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@511suBd5VvL
 

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yes! that is the knot manatee, good find. Who would of thought Wikipedia would have it. I searched several mountain climbing knot sites and gave up looking. It is a great knot, easy to tie with two ends but I keep forgetting how to tie it in the center of a line so I just resigned to using the figure 8 for that application.
 

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yes! that is the knot manatee, good find. Who would of thought Wikipedia would have it. I searched several mountain climbing knot sites and gave up looking. It is a great knot, easy to tie with two ends but I keep forgetting how to tie it in the center of a line so I just resigned to using the figure 8 for that application.
Practice, practice, practice. :)

Lineman's is better than figure-8 loop: more secure, easy to untie (and tie, once you train your fingers). If you google "brion toss linemans loop", you'll find a link to the pages of the book showing how to tie it. Do the same for strait bend. It's a great little book.

Have fun.
 

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You're welcome. Glad I could help.
 

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Would avoid clove hitch when putting snubber on chain. Was told can work loose if have load/unload cycles but +1 on rolling hitch for that function. As said extra loops all to the good. The extra turn seems to make all the difference. Given up on reef knots unless I know will need to untie in short time. Rather use surgeons knots. It's just a reef knot with extra turn at beginning of knot. Same issue as clove hitch - reef knot can untie with load/unload or migrate and surgeon's knot doesn't.
 
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