SailNet Community banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I recently purchased a Watkins 23 and it is in need of some new lines.

I am new to sailing and this is my first sailboat, so I'm not good with all the names of the lines and parts of the boat.

The line in particular that needs replaced is the one that goes to the tops of the mast. I guess this is the one that raises the main sail. What "kind" of rope should I get? What size?

I am not racing this boat or anything, just pleasure sailing. I am hoping to get an "all round" rope for all of the lines on the boat. Is this possible? If so, what do I need to look for?

The boat has been sitting for 10 years so all of my lines will need replaced.

What about my anchor line? What should I use.

Im not looking for the absolute best, just the standard is fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
504 Posts
Before you do or by anything, you need to get a feel for the basics. Read as much as you can and try to go sailing with some more experienced sailors, either on your boat or theirs.

Welcome to sailing and SailNet, by the way.

The line in particular that needs replaced is the one that goes to the tops of the mast. I guess this is the one that raises the main sail. What "kind" of rope should I get? What size?
Size and length depend - about 10 mm will be sufficient. Get a decent, low stretch rope. You're looking for a "double braid.' Sta-Set X or better.

I am not racing this boat or anything, just pleasure sailing. I am hoping to get an "all round" rope for all of the lines on the boat. Is this possible? If so, what do I need to look for?
Ummmm - sort of. It's good if you can get rope for certain applications. IE, what's best for halyards isn't best for mainsheets, but you can use all of the same kind of rope if you feel a real need/budget constraint.

I do strongly advise that you get different color lines for each control line. This color coordination will make learning easier.

The boat has been sitting for 10 years so all of my lines will need replaced.

What about my anchor line? What should I use.
This is the anchor rode. Three strand is best, bigger is stronger.
Im not looking for the absolute best, just the standard is fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
ok, so would a 10mm double braid be good for all my lines, except the anchor rode?

What material should it be made from?
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
First, I'd highly recommend you get David Seidman's book The Complete Sailor, which is about $16 in most bookstores.

Second, it might be worth checking with Cajuntrading.ca for a rigging kit for your boat. A boat the size of yours could get away with 5/16" lines, but 3/8" or 10 mm lines will be easier on the hands. The line should probably be a good polyester double braid.

For an anchor line, you'd probably want something like a 14 lb. Delta FastSet and 25' of 1/4 chain and then 150' of 1/2" octo-plait nylon.

I'd also recommend you read the POST in my signature to help you get the most out of your time on sailnet. :)

I recently purchased a Watkins 23 and it is in need of some new lines.

I am new to sailing and this is my first sailboat, so I'm not good with all the names of the lines and parts of the boat.

The line in particular that needs replaced is the one that goes to the tops of the mast. I guess this is the one that raises the main sail. What "kind" of rope should I get? What size?

I am not racing this boat or anything, just pleasure sailing. I am hoping to get an "all round" rope for all of the lines on the boat. Is this possible? If so, what do I need to look for?

The boat has been sitting for 10 years so all of my lines will need replaced.

What about my anchor line? What should I use.

Im not looking for the absolute best, just the standard is fine.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
This may be obvious to more experienced sailors but it will help you to use different colors for different functions, rather than buying a role of line all one color. It's a lot easier to tell which one is the main halyard and which one is the outhaul etc etc if they are distinctive colors. Also easier when you want someone else to pull on a line to tell them to pull in a foot or so of the red line.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
One other thing - there are several kinds of 'rope' you can get. In most cases you will want what is known as Double braid. This means that there is an inner core and an outer jacket - it is the colorful stuff you'll see in a Chandlery / Boat supply place. Within the world of double braid there is standard old line and there is the stuff that has a stronger less stretchy core, usually called Spectra or Dyneema. It may be a good idea to consider using this Spectra / Dyneema line for the halyards (the lines that pull the sails up) even if you don't plan to do any racing. Even on a pleasure sailing boat it's nice to be able to tension the halyards and have them stay more or less tensioned rather than slowly getting loose as the line stretches.

Spectra for some of the other lines, while common on race boats or large cruisers, may be overkill for you.

There is a more detailed discussion about ropes at this place

Also samson ropes, yale cordage and New England rope have some good info about rope selection on their web sites.
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
Not essential, but really nice... the boat would still be usable if he went and got all the lines in a single color...and he'd probably save a tiny bit of money doing so...
Different colored lines are essential
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
33 Posts
I don't disagree SD, my opinion is influenced by the thought of our tireless racing team trying to sort out which of the tangled together white lines is connected to the vang while the the spin is flogging after a gybe gone bad in 25 knots of breeze off Tasman Island at night. Admittedly this is a situation that a 23 foot family fun boat is unlikely to experience.

(we're the boat on the left. Yes, the mainsheet hand did manage to ease the sheet and no, we didn't hit them. Their eyes, however, were the size of small saucers)
 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
1,000 Posts
Nice photo....does look like you're about to ram and board them though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
214 Posts
BC:

I use three-strand nylon (5/8") for my mooring lines and anchor rode for my Watkins 23 XL. The reason is that three strand nylon is very strong and it will stretch readily which reduces stress on the vessel; three strand is also easy to splice and a lot cheaper than double braid. I had to put a larger hawsepipe on the foc'sle but its an easy job.

What an awsome little boat we have! Have lots of fun and post a picture or two!

Mike
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
165 Posts
Also, take a look at the end of spool remnant rack. If you know how long of a line you need, sometimes you can pickup a good deal, like 50% off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
410 Posts
First, I'd highly recommend you get David Seidman's book The Complete Sailor, which is about $16 in most bookstores.
Yes, get this book- it's amazing! I am also pretty new to sailing, and have read that book cover to cover like 6 times. It should be required reading for anyone just getting into sailing IMO.
 
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top