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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I recently received of 13foot wooden boat from a family friend and to make it work I will need a bunch of help to make it operation able as it is my first time repairing a wooden craft. The boat was in poor condition due to rot In some areas(mostly the skeleton of the craft and the top covering), we have mostly cleared up the rot in the skeleton and are replacing the top. The bottom was replaced recently so that's not a issue, The boat needs to be refibberglassed so I need help with how do it and with what brand/type. Also I need to know whether or not to waterproof the inside or not and how to do so.







 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Tommays I have looked around the hull and there are clear signs of fiber glass or someother kind of covering around the wood also I was told it was previously fiberglassed so was it just Improperly constructed?
 

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what wood is it? some are built with a light layer of glass to protect against the elements

you could do just that, sand away all old glass get fresh wood exposed and seal withthicked epoxy or go ahead and glass with 2 layers or so

its not that its such a bad method its more that once water eneters its only a matter of time before delamination, core issues and water rot occurs like you already know.

if the wood is in bad condition then your options start to decrease and costs increase in order to fix.

sealing the inside(this could be epoxy and paint cheaply) is just as important as sealing the outside...
 

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thought so...thats probably how it was built...

Id seal up the insides, reinforce daggerboard trunk and certain areas...then lightly glass the outer hull...

thats about all you can do...
 

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It's usually cheaper to buy a sound older boat than to restore a badly deteriorated one, but it's your time and money. Some people find the restoration process, and the final result, satisfying.

What kind of boat is it? It might be a rarity.
 

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It depends on how attached you are to it. I saw a "rebuild" that only used the name, wheel and the ship's log. He called it a rebuild for tax reasons. HE DID NOT WANT TO PAY DUTY ON IT. ;-)

Have FUN!
O'
 

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I see Siamese so you thinks it's not worth the effort?
It depends on the boat. Keep in mind it will never have any value no matter how much work you put into it. You could have an already fixed up boat that size with a trailer for a few hundred dollars. If you are ok with that then dig in. As a project it might be ok. I would try to find out more on the providence of the boat. If it was some back yard hack job that did not sail well to start with then it might not be worth it. On the other hand if it is a boat that sails well you will at least you will have an enjoyable expensive toy in end.

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Hog wash!

Wood boats are wonderful especially in this size range. Though it does depend on the condition and quality of original construction.

West System has an excellent PDF document for free that will tell you all you want or need to know about epoxy and various methods of boat construction.
Look here. http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=...MeNCMNsdI2vJdqvGPIWF5aA&bvm=bv.71198958,d.aWw

West Systems is an excellent company with excellent products but they are not cheap. If you want similar quality but much better priced epoxy look at either Fiberglass , Epoxy , Composites, Carbon Fiber - U.S. Composites, Inc. or Raka, Inc. 772-489-4070. You will save a bundle.

If you want to tap into some of the smartest and wisest boat folks go to wooden boat magazine forum. Sorry sailnet I love ya but you all don't hold a candle to the smarts on Wooden Boat Forum and way less drama as long as you stay out of the bilge. They will tell you what is worth repairing and how best to do it. Plus they won't tell you to burn a wood boat because they think all wood boats are poor craft. We can try all we want to out engineer wood but we fail all day long. Composite craft properly constructed and designed with wood, carbon, glass, Kevlar, epoxy or vinylester etc will be far superior in almost every respect to solid glass, carbon or structural foam composite. You will have a stiffer, lighter, and stronger boat in just about every respect. Rot is not a problem in a properly constructed and maintained boat.

With out pictures it is hard to tell how bad your particular situation might be. It has been a long standing debate to glass inside and out of a wooden boat but a lot depends on the type of construction utilized and how the boat is used. Dry sailed just use a good polyurethane and put 5 coats inside and out after you seal the wood with three coats of epoxy or skip the epoxy if budget warrants and just maintain your paint. If you want some protection from beaching etc just some glass below water line. If you do glass inside and out don't thicken the epoxy before you encapsulate the wood. The epoxy or better yet the wood could be warmed a little before neat epoxy is applied. If you don't treat the wood with the neat epoxy before glassing then you risk the wood sucking the epoxy out of your cloth an not filling all of the weave of the fabric. There is nothing as beautiful as a wood boat. Cheers Justin
 

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It depends on the boat. Keep in mind it will never have any value no matter how much work you put into it. You could have an already fixed up boat that size with a trailer for a few hundred dollars. If you are ok with that then dig in. As a project it might be ok. I would try to find out more on the providence of the boat. If it was some back yard hack job that did not sail well to start with then it might not be worth it. On the other hand if it is a boat that sails well you will at least you will have an enjoyable expensive toy in end.

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When did any of us think we were going to make money on our boats? Is there value in taking a decent boat and making it usable, while receiving the reward in the DIY aspect, and learning that occurred. 13 foot boats are the place to do this stuff. Don't start with a 50 foot century old sailing schooner start with a free 13 foot boat that with a little time and money will make a fun little boat to play with. Justin
 

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pics pics pics...I agree wholeheardtedly with the comments above...there is not much love for anything old or fixeable here...doesnt mean some dont fix old stuff I just see so many comments that are negative and unhelpful.

there are many threads that start and end in a dramatic fashion cause someone said something similar to what has been said already

if the ply is decent in most parts you can fix and patch

seal with epoxy, btw you can also go cheap and seal with resin and do 1 or 2 layers of glass which I mentioned before...

again without pics not much point in arguing...but I try to persuade people to invest a little love in their stuff before dumping it...you never know.

good luck whatever you do.
 

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Fenex, you can find PDF files about materials and techniques and even cell for free tech support at West Systems. They're the go-to name in frp repair materials.

There are also plenty of wooden boat resources to be found. Last time I heard, the consensus was that unless you took totally dry wood and totally encased in in FRP to ensure no water ever got into it again? It didn't matter what you did, the damp wood would still rot out and a lot of time and money go do the drain with it.

Yes, laying up from frp over old wood can buy you another year or three but it still is going downhill and the only question is how fast. Better to put that time and money into a boat that you can keep, or at least resell.

Just one man's opinion. Check out "Woodenboat Magazine" and others for more experienced points of view.
 

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When did any of us think we were going to make money on our boats? Is there value in taking a decent boat and making it usable, while receiving the reward in the DIY aspect, and learning that occurred. 13 foot boats are the place to do this stuff. Don't start with a 50 foot century old sailing schooner start with a free 13 foot boat that with a little time and money will make a fun little boat to play with. Justin
Well lots of people think boats are worth a lot, and will sink money into them and when they try to sell them they are shocked at how little they are worth. Just want the OP to know that a small 13 foot plywood sailboat even if fully restored has very little value, before they sink a lot of money into it. I see boats like that on CL all the time and people ask way too much and you see the ads for years with the price dropping and dropping. Sure as a fun project that is fine. Even restoring something that belonged to or was made by a beloved family member sure. Just go in understanding it would likely be much cheaper to get a boat in good shape. The fiberglass and resin will cost more than one could pick up a decent used sailing dingy for. And what if it is some home made thing that the hull is all wrong and will not sail well at all? Then they spent money and time and won't really be able to enjoy it.

I did not say don't do it, just be aware of what it might cost and your options. Heck it may be cheaper to get it sailing than to pay to have it hulled off!
 

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If it's rotted out plywood could be good for growing nasturtiums. Have to be pretty good boat before it's worrh a couple hundred bucks in resin and paint. Could start with new material and great learning curve to be proud of.
 

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I see Siamese so you thinks it's not worth the effort?
Fenex.. don't let the naysayers disway you. Take some photos and Join the wooden boat forum. Be warned they can be even more brutal there. I'm the same name on that site also.
If you boat is plywood it may be fairly new and was left outdoors and the ply became soggy and rotted. Some plywood boats are glassed on the outside.

I know a lady here on sailnet that is/was a wooden boat builder! :D:D:D

Does the boat look anything like this?
 
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