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Sailings Newest Addict
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Hey guys,

I have a 1974 O'Day Widgeon and when I got her, there was very little of the original rigging intact or even present. So I have a few questions that I was unable to dig up using the search function.

First, is there a particular type of rope I should be using? the rigging that was present was all 1/4" three strand laid. I had read previously in several instances that I shouldn't be using anything less than 3/8", and the tackle in most instances looks better with 3/8" rope being used. Is nylon rope acceptable or do you have any recommendations? I do prefer three strand laid as I'm rather familiar with splicing already and would prefer not to relearn. As they say, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Secondly, from what I have seen in various diagrams, I have several options for the mainsheet. There are two that appear to fit the bill, so for this discussion the other options will be discarded.
The first is using the mainsheet as the traveler. It would go from the swivel/clam cleat to the middle of the boom, then to the pulley on the back of the boom, to an eye on the starboard side of the stern, to the eye on the port side of the stern, and then be made fast to an eye on the very end of the boom.
The second option uses a rope bridle traveler secured to the two eyes on the stern of the boat either with a bowline or a stopper knot. The mainsheet would then pass from the swivel/clam cleat as previously stated down the length of the boom. After passing through the pulley on the end of the boom it would drop down to a pulley which would ride on the traveler and return back to the boom to be made fast on the eye on the very end of the boom.

Are there any pros and cons to either of these arrangements? Any advice or opinions are more than welcome. Thanks guys!!!

Seth,
 

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Sailings Newest Addict
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Discussion Starter #2
I found some pictures of the two mainsheet options that I am considering. They are located at a website called Glen-L (I haven't built up sufficient posts to be able to post links, sorry!!!) but for ease of discussion I will attach them here. I severely appreciate any feedback about either one. Thanks guys!!!
 

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Short answer, the only thing you want nylon rope on is your anchor or dock lines. Everything else should be polyester or higher tech.

Either mainsheet system will work fine. It's your choice. However, I would research rope more before buying anything, and research your particular boat a bit more. I have some info on my website.
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Hey guys,

I have a 1974 O'Day Widgeon and when I got her, there was very little of the original rigging intact or even present. So I have a few questions that I was unable to dig up using the search function.

First, is there a particular type of rope I should be using? the rigging that was present was all 1/4" three strand laid. I had read previously in several instances that I shouldn't be using anything less than 3/8", and the tackle in most instances looks better with 3/8" rope being used. Is nylon rope acceptable or do you have any recommendations? I do prefer three strand laid as I'm rather familiar with splicing already and would prefer not to relearn. As they say, if it ain't broke, don't fix it.

Secondly, from what I have seen in various diagrams, I have several options for the mainsheet. There are two that appear to fit the bill, so for this discussion the other options will be discarded.
The first is using the mainsheet as the traveler. It would go from the swivel/clam cleat to the middle of the boom, then to the pulley on the back of the boom, to an eye on the starboard side of the stern, to the eye on the port side of the stern, and then be made fast to an eye on the very end of the boom.
The second option uses a rope bridle traveler secured to the two eyes on the stern of the boat either with a bowline or a stopper knot. The mainsheet would then pass from the swivel/clam cleat as previously stated down the length of the boom. After passing through the pulley on the end of the boom it would drop down to a pulley which would ride on the traveler and return back to the boom to be made fast on the eye on the very end of the boom.

Are there any pros and cons to either of these arrangements? Any advice or opinions are more than welcome. Thanks guys!!!

Seth,
Welcome.

Found this thread:

http://forums.oday.sailboatowners.com/showthread.php?p=761644

To search a particular forum/website for info: in your search engine window, format a search request like this--

"o'day widgeon rigging" site:http://www.sailnet.com/forums/

1) use the quotes around multi-word search terms to avoid irrelevant results based on single words in your search.
2) *important* no {space} between "site:" and site address.

Fair winds, have fun!
 

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Here is some of the least inexpensive rope I have found. Cajun Ropes » Cajun XLE They have different types but the XLE is the "high" quality stuff. For your sheets I would do either 1/4 or 5/16. On my Lido 14 I opted for 5/16 because it is easier on the hands and 1/4 felt a little too small to me. For all other lines I went with 1/4". I have received the lines and am Very happy with them. When I ordered them it took a couple weeks for him to respond so don't get frustrated if it takes some time.

Edit: You could also get away with the Dinghy braid but they only offer it in 1/4 as the biggest size.
 

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Sailings Newest Addict
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Discussion Starter #6
Thank you all for the great advice! I have been researching the ropes and I think that I have located some decent stuff on rwrope.com. I was looking at their buff polyester 3 strand. Are there any really big reasons that I should not use 3 strand? As I've been looking around, I see that most people use braid and literally no racers use 3 strand. I understand that twist stretches more, but my thought is that I am rather familiar with splicing and the construction of 3 strand, so I would be more confident in my equipment. And that confidence would go a long way in getting me out on the water sooner. Any thoughts on the rope I'm looking at?
Thank you!!!

Seth,
 

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Braided is best for running rigging. It's the lowest stretch, won't kink as much, and is much stronger for the same size. That being said if you opted for 3 strand it would probably work just fine. That boat probably originally had 3 strand on it. Is there a reason you will need to splice it? Braided is much more difficult to splice but if you had to you could always do a whip splice.
 

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Sailings Newest Addict
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Discussion Starter #8
I will need to splice the halyards to the shackles. As far as I'm aware those are the only splices necessary.
 

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That is very interesting. It appears to be very much like the clinch knot used when fishing. Do you have any experience using that knot?

Perhaps I am just being stubborn and stuck in my ways. If I opted to go with the braid, what line and manufacturer would you recommend?
Thank you all again for your wonderful advice so far!!!

Seth,
 

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Yep on both my Halyards that is how I attached the line. On a small boat like ours there isn't a huge amount of tension on the halyard. Although in the pictures it looks like they are using it to attach the line to a big boat.

In terms of which line I would go with. It depends on how much money you want to spend. If money isn't a big concern I would instantly go with New England Ropes. It's probably one of the highest rated rope. For my climbing ropes I have purchased in the past I only trust New England. Just like anything you'll probably get people recommending all sorts of rope.

Because I'm a cheapskate I went with Cajun Ropes. After pricing them out it cost about 40% less than New England. I haven't had any problems with them yet but I'm on my first season. Someone else in the forums recommended them to me.

Edit: Oh! And if you want to try splicing the braided rope here is a great PDF created by NE Ropes. http://www.neropes.com/Resources/84906_NEROPE.pdf If you were going to try your hand at splicing I would probably order the line a little longer than needed in case you need to try the splice a couple times. In the guide it tells you how much line is required for the splice so you can judge how much extra to get.
 
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