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So not really sure what questions I may have, but’s here’s my plan. Purchasing a new to me used 46 ft Beneteau in Annapolis MD and sailing/motoring down the Eastern seaboard to its new home in Stuart Florida. This will take place in early to mid August. Anyone have any recommendations on routes heading South or can educate me at all on anything related to this passage. My sailing experience is pretty limited, only owning a 26ft sailboat for the last 3 years, but I’ve been boating for about 25 yrs. I’ve never done an offshore passage. But have bareboat chartered a 37 footer in the BVI. My father, who is a power boater but not a sailer, will be accompanying me. I’m currently attempting to find at least one other to crew with us. My dad and I are both physically fit, and handy with most things mechanical.


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So not really sure what questions I may have, but’s here’s my plan. Purchasing a new to me used 46 ft Beneteau in Annapolis MD and sailing/motoring down the Eastern seaboard to its new home in Stuart Florida. This will take place in early to mid August. Anyone have any recommendations on routes heading South or can educate me at all on anything related to this passage. My sailing experience is pretty limited, only owning a 26ft sailboat for the last 3 years, but I’ve been boating for about 25 yrs. I’ve never done an offshore passage. But have bareboat chartered a 37 footer in the BVI. My father, who is a power boater but not a sailer, will be accompanying me. I’m currently attempting to find at least one other to crew with us. My dad and I are both physically fit, and handy with most things mechanical.


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Nice boat ..Congrats

Get a delivery Captain as you need experience.
Also do you realize you are doing this in the middle of hurricane season.

Personally I would keep the boat in AAnnapolis and shake it down and get some experience on her , test out all the systems and hold off till October.
 

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Did a delivery trip similar to this in 2012 but in November. Met up with Sandy coming up the coast. So it's hard to predict what is best when it's Hurricane Season. No matter what time of year you make the trip it will be arduous. I would suggest that you take the ICW from Norfolk and then go outside at Moorehead City and Sail/ Motorsail to Charleston to refuel and take a break.Then outside again to Fernandina Beach where you can stay in the ICW or head offshore depending on the weather as long as you stay close in to avoid the Gulf Stream.
This is not a trip for a novice even in the ditch. Make sure that you have all the necessary navigation tools and know how to use them. Also a good idea to stay current on the Notices to Mariners. The aids to navigation are not always where they show up on the charts if there has been serious weather. A good possibility this time of year.
Chefs recommendation of a delivery captain warrants consideration. You might also consider posting in the crew wanted section of this forum as well to see if you can find members who would accompany you for segments of the trip. You might luck out and find folks that are really helpful, there are some folks on here that know their stuff but then again you might wind up with Knuckleheads. (no disrespect to the knuckleheads... you can't help yourselves it's just in your jeans)
 

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One of the best resources for that transit can be found in the (click on) Blog of the yacht Fleetwind. In particular, the 2017 ICW Cruising Guide offered on the site.

Note, however, that the merit of such a transit is questionable unless you're doing it for the sake of entertainment (although that, in mid-hurricane season may not be wise either). Some years ago we purchased our current yacht in Annapolis with the intention of bringing her south on her own bottom. After extensive research and careful planning, however, it became clear that the cost of that effort, to say nothing of the time involved, would equal or potentially exceed the cost of shipping. Accordingly, we contracted with A&B Marine, working out of Bert Jabin's yard on Back Creek, to transport the boat to Florida and we were very glad we did so. The total cost was about $3,500 including haul and relaunch and preping the boat for transit. The trip itself took only two days from Annapolis to Bradenton, Florida. It was worth it!

FWIW...
 

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Barquito
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One of the best resources for that transit can be found in the (click on) Blog of the yacht Fleetwind. In particular, the 2017 ICW Cruising Guide offered on the site.

Note, however, that the merit of such a transit is questionable unless you're doing it for the sake of entertainment (although that, in mid-hurricane season may not be wise either). Some years ago we purchased our current yacht in Annapolis with the intention of bringing her south on her own bottom. After extensive research and careful planning, however, it became clear that the cost of that effort, to say nothing of the time involved, would equal or potentially exceed the cost of shipping. Accordingly, we contracted with A&B Marine, working out of Bert Jabin's yard on Back Creek, to transport the boat to Florida and we were very glad we did so. The total cost was about $3,500 including haul and relaunch and preping the boat for transit. The trip itself took only two days from Annapolis to Bradenton, Florida. It was worth it!

FWIW...
That is probably a good option to consider given the inexperience of the crew. However, given an experienced captain and crew with unlimited time, delivering the boat offshore should be much less expensive. Regardless, if you go in hurricane season, work out a bunch of places you can have the boat pulled, or hide if things get nasty.
 

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No brainer. Buy some towboat insurance and motor down the ICW. If you don't want to give up the time to do it pay a delivery captain.

But as others have said if it can be trucked that is the way to go but at 46 ft may be a bridge to fat to high etc. . Several companies offer this service.

Going offshore in August even with an experienced delivery crew might be interesting.
 

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One of None
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My opinion of a no-brainer is to buy a boat in Florida, that alone probably just saved you a between 5 and 10K

logic dictates that the only place there are more sailboats for sale then Maryland Annapolis Area would be in Florida, or possibly Oriental
 

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Nice boat ..Congrats

Get a delivery Captain as you need experience.
Also do you realize you are doing this in the middle of hurricane season.

Personally I would keep the boat in AAnnapolis and shake it down and get some experience on her , test out all the systems and hold off till October.
Excellent advice.
 

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Accordingly, we contracted with A&B Marine, working out of Bert Jabin's yard on Back Creek, to transport the boat to Florida and we were very glad we did so. The total cost was about $3,500 including haul and relaunch and preping the boat for transit. The trip itself took only two days from Annapolis to Bradenton, Florida. It was worth it!

FWIW...
How long ago did you have your boat delivered? That seems really cheap, probably a lot cheaper than a professional delivery Captain would charge for a few week delivery. I know it would depend on conditions but on average how long would this type of delivery take?
 

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Don't listen to these nay sayers. If anything is going to happen, its going to happen out there. Kick the tires, light the fire and get that baby going. I just don't think its wise to be going south in hurricane season and your insurance agent just might have a thing or two to say about it. As far as ducking in if (maybe when) a hurricane comes up the coast pretty sure the first words out of the marinas mouth will be "We are busy pulling our contracted customers out." Also the bugs will love you, you are fresh meat. Do the trip later in the year, maybe start mid October.
 

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To Jephotog
The trip is 12-14 days pushing hard. 2 days Annapolis to Norfolk, 3 days Norfolk to Morehead City in the ditch, 2 days Morehead City to Charleston on the outside, 2 days Charleston to Fernandina on the outside. 3 days Fernandina to Stuart on the outside. That's 12 days pushing pretty hard with quite a bit of the trip on the outside.

To Denise
Just curious as to where you derived your sales data from. I know that both Texas and Florida have more registered boats than Maryland but I'm not sure that it equates to lower prices on vessels in this size and price range.
 

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One of None
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you didn't see the words "My opinion" ?

I just threw it in, my own thoughts.

It just doesn't make sense to me to buy a boat long distance. no matter how he does it, it's expensive! and that is money that could be used towards the purchase of a bigger or better boat

Data is an Android :)
 

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Don't listen to these nay sayers. If anything is going to happen, its going to happen out there. Kick the tires, light the fire and get that baby going. I just don't think its wise to be going south in hurricane season and your insurance agent just might have a thing or two to say about it.
I think the idea of being able to duck in and get accommodations in case a Hurricane hits is unrealistic. If something goes wrong I imagine the locals will have first dibs lined up to the best protection. Imagine a storm coming up the coast at your brand new boat and you are trying to find a place to sit out a storm in a harbor you don't know with your cell phone and credit card as your only resource.
 

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I think the idea of being able to duck in and get accommodations in case a Hurricane hits is unrealistic. If something goes wrong I imagine the locals will have first dibs lined up to the best protection. Imagine a storm coming up the coast at your brand new boat and you are trying to find a place to sit out a storm in a harbor you don't know with your cell phone and credit card as your only resource.
As unrealistic as this sounded on a brief scan it’s actually a very astute comment by whomever made it.

There are ways to avoid the effects of a hurricane riding up the east coast other than tying up at a Marinia or getting pulled out there.

We have traveled from the Chesapeake to the LI Sound a number of times in August. Luck would have it it is when some tropical storms start curving northward and parallel the east coast of the US due to the breakdown of the blocking Bermuda High omnipresent in the summer. Sometimes the steering currents bring them ashore. Many times the year stay out off the coast, however the wave action promulgated by the wind machines can travel thousands of miles.

Ducking inland long ahead of them is a good storm avoidance tactic. And waiting for them to pass by. We have identified a number of Rivers to go up and have used them a number of times including the Delaware, Hudson, Connecticut, Thames and providence Rivers.
 

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Nick-
You'll need to check masthead height against intracoastal clearances. August is going into prime storm/hurricane season in Florida so you MUST be flexible about scheduling with the weather. If necessary that means being all set to go...and then going home for two weeks to try again. Doing a shakedown cruise (48 hours) in Annapolis, and planning to perhaps need another week or two up there to deal with issues, another thing you won't regret.
Between ICW depth clearances, bridge clearances, inlets being outright lethal in bad weather, possible storms, possible mechanical issues even if you do shakedown cruise, I would suggest that you need to get the charts, go over them carefully, and look at all the what-ifs. The trick should be a wonderful ride with no worries, and for many people it is. It is just what you don't plan for some crazy contingency that you find out, you're going against the Gulf Stream, and those waters can be outright hostile if you get caught short.
Plan ahead, shake down, keep a flexible schedule, and you should have a great ride.
 

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So not really sure what questions I may have, but’s here’s my plan. Purchasing a new to me used 46 ft Beneteau in Annapolis MD and sailing/motoring down the Eastern seaboard to its new home in Stuart Florida. This will take place in early to mid August. Anyone have any recommendations on routes heading South or can educate me at all on anything related to this passage. My sailing experience is pretty limited, only owning a 26ft sailboat for the last 3 years, but I’ve been boating for about 25 yrs. I’ve never done an offshore passage. But have bareboat chartered a 37 footer in the BVI. My father, who is a power boater but not a sailer, will be accompanying me. I’m currently attempting to find at least one other to crew with us. My dad and I are both physically fit, and handy with most things mechanical.


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Do NOT get a delivery captain!
Do it yourself.
This will be the most exciting trip of your life! The B46 is a excellent boat and just loves the sea.
The Annapolis trip is easy and can be graduated from motoring to short sails to longer ocean hops.

Not only that you get to stop in marvellous places to practice your docking and anchoring.

Why give a delivery captain such a choice trip?
Do it yourself and you will learn everything about your boat, and how to sail.

Enjoy it!
 

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Now I have read the other responses.

I just laugh.

Guy buys a boat. You tell him he can't sail it.

Just funny.

I've done the ICW twice and it's easy.

I've sailed outside and it's easy.

Hurricane season. Watch the weather. Book marinas ahead. Take the risk.

People who take no risks or listen to insurance companies have a boring life.
 

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You may not need a delivery captain... but do take a competent and experienced sailor... better yet someone who has made this trip outside or in the ditch. You do need to thoroughly check the boat and equip it for the journey. Plan in advance and even book marinas. Study the weather and go with a good 2 week forecast.
 

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Just put some diesel in the tanks and go , no captains ,maps or experience required. I mean whats the worst that can happen ehh?

P.S. Make sure you have a good life raft! and have a fun trip!
 

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Now I have read the other responses.

I just laugh.

Guy buys a boat. You tell him he can't sail it.

Just funny.

I've done the ICW twice and it's easy.

I've sailed outside and it's easy.

Hurricane season. Watch the weather. Book marinas ahead. Take the risk.

People who take no risks or listen to insurance companies have a boring life.
Good advice for a boat which you have shaken down. Who knows what’s hiding below that hasn’t been found

Today off NC tropical storm blowing wave propagation over 15 ft for 800 miles. Not a good time to try you manhood or cavalier attitude.

Learn your boat. Then make the trip. Watch the weather as it’s hurrican season.
 
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