SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 28 Posts

·
Remember you're a womble
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
So... the leach line on my smaller genoa (I would think it's maybe a 105/115 or so, reaches to just behind the mast), has snapped half way up so the sail flogs in any sort of breeze, the dacron is brittle, some seams are coming apart and the foot and the leach also were sunburnt by a PO. Basically I fear this particular sail may be pretty much at the end of its usable life. Probably a bit past it to be fair, but there you go.
Anyway, I have a reasonable condition larger genoa (would guess a 150) which is fine for the lighter air days we often get up here, but it is not going to reef down to anything approaching a decent shape in some of the heavier winds I like to go out in (20-25kts).
I guess I am now in the market for a new genoa, I'm thinking of getting something around the 115 mark, should be good for 18-20 at full size, and yet should still reef with a reasonable shape down to about an 85 for when it really starts to get a little snorty. The 150 should reef down OK to about 130 for those 12-18 days.
Any flaws in my plan? I almost always singlehand, don't race but I do like to try and have the best sail and sail shape available all the time. Would a 130 be a better all-round replacement for both? My concern is that if it kicks up a bit, the 130 might not reef with a good shape.
Or of course I just carry on until I actually shred the old one :)
 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I live in Seattle, so very similar sailing conditions to Victoria (though with less direct access to the Straits).

I had a 135% (about 300sqft) made for my boat this year and it rolls down to around 100% pretty well. When the wind really picks up I still want the ability to run with less sail.

I just bought a sail that is about 100% (200sqft) on eBay as my "winter" sail. I tried it out today and it worked great:


Given that you have a 150% in good shape I'd say that a 110% makes sense as a second sail. However if you don't plan on racing this boat I think in the long run a 130% and 100% make the most sense. If you think you might replace the 150% in the next few years I'd get a 100% now.

I don't like buying used sails sight unseen, but this one was listed as new on eBay, had a copy of the original receipt showing specifications, and had a 15 day return policy, so I figured it was worth the risk. I'm glad that I did it.
 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I was out on the sound. We didn't sail for long, maybe an hour. Just out to the shipping lanes and tacked back.

There was ice in the marina:


Paul said that he was out sailing for 4 hours, that is much more hard core!
 

·
Remember you're a womble
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
Yep, was out for just shy of 4 hours. When I left it was a positively barmy 28F, with the wind-chill knocking it down to a mildly cool 18F. By the time I came back in, I was basking in an oven-like 30F.
Was quite nice actually, good breeze, bright sunshine, pretty much perfect really.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,489 Posts
I'd agree go for the new '100/110', with an eye to replacing the 150 eventually with a 135 that would probably work most days for you.

I had a good experience last year with UK in Sidney.
 

·
Remember you're a womble
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
I'd probably either go for a nice little something built by Leitch & McBride here in Sidney, or a cheapo online one to tide me over. That's a discussion for another thread of course, of which there are many ;)
Or I might just see if I can somehow fix the busted leechline and leave new sails for another year (again).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,244 Posts
Smaller but OK, with battens...

I'd agree go for the new '100/110', with an eye to replacing the 150 eventually with a 135 that would probably work most days for you.

I had a good experience last year with UK in Sidney.
When we got tired of cranking in a 135 for a decade.... I went with a new 95% RF jib with vertical battens.
It's wonderful. While we could use a bit more sail area in winds under 5 kts, we still sail...
Of course our boat is an easily-driven design. The battens are the key to making the idea work, BTW. The upper half of the sail probably has about the same area and drive as a 115 or similar.

Loren

ps: tried to u/l a photo, but there is a "server error" of some sort at present.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Faster

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,489 Posts
Re: Smaller but OK, with battens...

ps: tried to u/l a photo, but there is a "server error" of some sort at present.
Loren.. Our new admin is working on the upload issue, I believe, but using a hosting site like photobucket works best overall.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
865 Posts
You should probably consult with your sailmaker regarding jib lead location for your new, smaller headsail. If you can sheet inside of the shrouds, you will be able to point higher.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
113 Posts
Yep, was out for just shy of 4 hours. When I left it was a positively barmy 28F, with the wind-chill knocking it down to a mildly cool 18F. By the time I came back in, I was basking in an oven-like 30F.
Was quite nice actually, good breeze, bright sunshine, pretty much perfect really.
Oh man I feel your pain! My wife and I went out for a sail today and when we were in the shade behind the sails we had to have had a wind chill of 75 degrees or less. I almost had to put my shirt back on ;) Winter in Jacksonville is just too harsh sometimes.
 

·
Remember you're a womble
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
Yeah, that's going to involve installing tracks or other hardware so that isn't going to happen. The boat points pretty well already so not bothered about that really.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,244 Posts
Check out the photo in reply 32 in this thread about smaller jibs at the EY.o site.
Self Tacking Jibs, anyone?

Aside: 16 freezin' degrees this am in PDX -- wish it was August again and I was out sailing just like I was when that picture was taken! :)
 

·
Remember you're a womble
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Sail handling isn't a problem, I'm quite happy tacking a 150. I'm just looking for a new sail rather than extensively modifying the boat :)
 

·
Remember you're a womble
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
Anyhow, I managed to fix up the leechline so I'll throw the old one back up and sail it till I break it :)
 

·
I don't discuss my member
Joined
·
2,557 Posts
Paul, a sailmaker will be able to cut a sail using whatever lead you have now. The clew will just be higher.
 

·
Remember you're a womble
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
Not worth re-cutting, I did look into it and it's a significant % of a new sail cost.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I'm over hear on lake Pend Orielle in Northern Idaho...I had a 150 and a 100 setup when I bought my boat...Yager Sails. local sailmaker here in Spokane built a bi-radial 135 for me and I hung it on a furler...can take it down to 90 if I need it and it does just great...only thing is now I want a 1.5 or 2 oz drifter for the boat...
 

·
Remember you're a womble
Joined
·
2,328 Posts
Discussion Starter #20
Well, I got a couple of quotes for a new 110. I guess I need to look at my 150 in closer detail to see how good it is, I might end up just replacing them both with a 130.
 
1 - 20 of 28 Posts
Top