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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I'm Preston. I live in the South Puget Sound area around Olympia. I moved here from Arkansas about 3 years ago to keep my grands while my daughter was deployed. I sold everything and stayed here... I have always wanted to learn to sail but Arkansas isn't really much of a place to learn. So, now, I'm thinking of buying a liveaboard and learn the ropes.
If anyone on here lives in the area maybe we could talk sometime, I could use all the help I can get.
Thanks, hope to learn a lot and meet new friends on here.
 

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Owl
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273 Posts
start smaller. you'll learn more, faster, with lighter consequences, on a small boat.
Take classes. trial and error is a hard teacher.
Try different boats before you commit to one.

I would suggest you check out the Puget Sound Sailing Club, consider joining at the "gold" level, take all the classes they have and sail every chance you get for a year. Then if you still like it, spring for the big boat.
 

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Superior Sailor
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"Why" do you want to live on a boat..?

They are cold, wet, cramped and can sink out from under you for any number of reasons...expensive to maintain and forget about the attached garage...

What's the draw to something you've never done before..?
 

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Swab
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Welcome to SailNet!

We are not in your area now but we expect to be back later this year. (MIL lives in Gig Harbor).

Living aboard and sailing (The same boat) are almost mutually exclusive, especially if learning to sail is part of the equation. I have lived aboard continuously for 23 years now. The only time we sail is when we have someplace to go (Like Hawaii):D

It is just too much hassle to pack up and stow all the live-aboard stuff for a day sail. You could get a live-aboard boat, then learn to sail through one of the many clubs in the area. Learning to sail on the typical overloaded live-aboard boat would be counter productive and VERY unforgiving of mistakes...

...but I have seen it done :rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I was planning on living on the boat and taking lessons. I've been several times. My son has a boat and is sailing Key West and then Caribbean I believe. I live by myself. Just always loved the water.
 

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Superior Sailor
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Well good, then you should fit right in... as long as you don't have unrealistic expectations from all the brochures with bikini babes that don't wear pfds...
 

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Superior Sailor
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Well yeah...that's why I bought my boat too....
 

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██▓▓▒▒░&
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ppop, I'd suggest taking a basic sailing course (typically 3 days split into two weekends) to learn how the mechanics of it work and get comfortable with it. Followed by a "bareboat" course, which typically is a week aboard a larger boat, living on it and sailing it and learning boat systems.

No, that's not the cheapest way to go but it gives you a solid foundation and a chance to make sure the surprises won't be expensive ones. And it can even be a fun vacation.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hellosailor I've had a basic sailor course. Also I joined the Puget sound sailing group and have been out on a few sails with them. I would like to do more but they are usually. Weekends which I work.
 
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