SailNet Community banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
Welcome from another new member and best of luck to you.

Just my .02 for what it's worth - +1 on deniseO30. Try to get out on some boats before you pull the trigger. I found that sailboats under sail in most waters are smaller than you think. I thought I wanted a 28 footer for my first; ended up with a 36. (Granted that's for the Chesapeake Bay). Unless you have time to burn, get a boat in best condition for your needs/wants/budget.

Cheers,

Annapolitan
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
87 Posts
I guess "learning" and "owning" are somewhat separate though related concepts. Learning on a smaller boat obviously has many advantages as others with much more knowledge and experience here than I can expound on. I had sailed a bit on others' boats before buying my own boat. I came to the point where I wanted a boat for bay and coastal cruising. The Chesapeake Bay makes boats smaller, which is why I ended up with larger than what I originally thought I wanted way back. If you want to learn on a boat you own, then certainly smaller (at least initially) can have many advantages. It also depends on what you ultimately want to do (which you may not know now). Many want to do nothing more than day-sailing with a trailer boat. In that case go for that if you're intent on learning on your own boat. But I know many folks who started with that who quickly realized they wanted more and then were selling what they thought they wanted to get what they realize they really want after a fairly short amount of time. Nothing wrong with trading up though. Just takes a lot of time and effort.

Cheers,

Annapolitan
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top