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Discussion Starter #1
Ahoy Sailnet!
New member here who just bought a McVay Bluenose Sloop about a week ago. Timing was tight as winter set in about three days later. Just had long enough to give her a quick wash and get to know her a bit before covering up.

For those who don't know, the Bluenose was originally designed as club racer in the 1940's by WJ Roué, of Bluenose Schooner fame. She is 23.5 LOA, full keeled, with a 2000lb displacement. With a narrow beam of just over six feet she should move along pretty nicely.

I grew up around boats as a kid in Nova Scotia, and got to sail on schooners in Mahone Bay. That all changed when our family moved to Ontario in 1967 and my sailing days came to an end.

Fast forwarding to last August, I spotted an advertisement for a McVay Minuet(smaller sister to the Bluenose) which sparked my imagination and began my search for such a boat. I love the classic lines of the Bluenose and can't wait for spring to arrive.

I have a lot to learn and do between now and then as I get ready to sail next year on the Ottawa River out of the Chat's Lake Boat Club, just west of Ottawa.

This boat, which will be named, Wanderer II(after my father's boat), is in fair condition, with unpainted original Gelcoat. There are a few bobo's to fix and it will get a good polishing in the spring, along with an epoxy barrier and anti-fouling paint below the water line. Sails and rigging seem decent, though I've discovered some welded repairs to the mast, near where the gooseneck attachs. Hopefully this will not be a problem.

Been a long time since I went sailing, so next year should be pretty exciting.

Looking forward to meeting and exchanging thoughts with all the good folk on Sailnet!

Peter
 

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Welcome, Peter, and congratulations on your new boat!
 
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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks Donna, Dave, and Roxanne for the welcome. It is an awesome thing to look forward to sailing a boat for the first time, and with five months or so to wait, I'll have lots to think about.
I've already bought the chart for the waters I'll be sailing and hope to have every shoal and hazard memorized by spring. :)
There is not too much else to do for now as the weather is too cold to work outside.
 

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Glad to have you ! Have fun with your new boat ! Winter will give you some time to putter around and look for little jobs. You can save some money for the new add on or the repair you wish to make. Read some good sailing books and spend time on Sailnet.
Welcome good man ! , Lou
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks Lou. I have her all wrapped up, so for now I'll have to stick to reading and daydreaming.
 

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Hi Peter,

I just picked up a 1970 bluenose that is in need of some TLC but should be out on the water in the next few weeks. Was wondering if you had any information on rigging, how the drain holes below the waterline work, and any other information that you have learned since owning your boat.

Thanks,

Will
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Hi Will, congratulations on your Bluenose.

I had a great time with mine last season, and I'm just getting ready to put it in this towards the end of the week.

The below water drains connect to the cockpit drains near the cabin. Mine had convoluted piping, ie two right angle crossing over to the opposite sides of the boat below. I replaced that with flexible hosing, but kept the same opposite sides of the boat connection, ie: the starboard inlet connected to the port outlet, the port inlet to the starboard outlet. I also removed the through hull fittings and drain cocks for inspection, and reinstalled them using 3M marine sealant. They work fine.

Last year I removed all bottom paint down to the gelcoat, and primed with Interprotect 2000e primer, and followed with VC17 antifouling paint. This years I'm focusing on the topsides by polishing the gelcoat and refinishing the teak.

It is a very nice boat to sail and it attracts a lot attention and compliments.

What do you want to know about the rigging?

Where are you located?

Peter
 

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Thanks for the reply!

I'm guessing that I close the valves when the boat is sitting and open them once I get moving? Or do they have a ball valve in them to only allow the water to flow one way? Should I put a plug in the drain hole at the front of the keel?

I'm located in Toronto but the boat is on Lake Muskoka.

In regards to rigging, I just want an idea of to set up the main sheet and jib. I'm sure I can figure it out but would like to do it the correct way.

Are you running a bilge pump and where have you placed this?

As you can tell, i'm pretty excited but also trying to bring myself up to speed on the boat.

Thanks,
Will
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Will, I leave the valves open all the time. Water won't come into the cockpit because it is above the waterline, just like a straw in a glass of water. Just be sure that your through hull fittings , and the tubes running to the **** pit are sound. If they were to fail below the water line the boat could sink. You may want to clear the the tubes with a garden hose before you launch, as they tend to clog with organic material such as leaves, etc..

I replaced the manual bilge pump under the seat with a new one. It is all I seem to need, as the only water that gets in the boat is rain water which sneaks in through the **** pit seats and the decks.

The jib sheets run through pulleys along the toe rails to the midship winches.
The main sail sheet runs through the traveller at the back of the cockpit. Pretty straight forward.

I'm happy answer any other questions you might have, however I am not expert by any means.
Peter
 

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So the cockpit should self drain even when sitting at the dock?

Did you have to replace any teak? If so, where did you get it? Along the gunwhale I have a few pieces in pretty rough shape that I want to replace.

As for the main and jib sheets, any idea how long they should be and what diameter of rope to use?

I'm pretty much going to plug away at getting everything in good repair and get out on the water and enjoy some sailing.

FYI- The boat is actually a 1979 and was built in cambridge, Ontario.

Will
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Will, I didn't notice that you previously mentioned a drain hole towards the front of the keel. Mine doesn't have one there but I did add a drain on one side of my keel towards the rear to prevent water from accumulating and freezing in the winter. If yours is like that you should definitely plug it before launching the boat.��

The jib sheets that came with my boat are made of fine braided white rope, approximately 1/2" thick, and perhaps 20feet on each side. It is actually one piece of rope with an attachment to hook on to the jib in the middle. The main sheet has two double pully blocks with with a mechanism to attach to the traveller car. Too bad that stuff wasn't included with your sails.

As to the teak, if it's only a small amount that needs replacing check with wood suppliers. Hamer Bay Marina, Hamer Bay Marine | Marina on Lake Joseph offering Muskoka boat rentals and BRP Platinum Certified Evinrude E-Tec and G2 outboard motor dealer., on Lake Joseph in the Muskokas used to be a McVay dealer. They might have some trim bits from a scrapped Bluenose. They also keep and maintain a few Bluenoses in their yard. It's a good chance that they were the original dealer for your boat. It think the fellow from parts/service name is Mike. He's friendly and can likely be of some help with your boat.
 

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Good morning All:
Having admired the Bluenose for years, I have just bought what I think is Hull number 327 built in 1977. It was owned for many years by Peter Lockyer in Picton, Ontario. I am in the midst of moving to Prince Edward County where I have been building a new house for the last few years. I think that there are several other Bluenoses around the Bay of Quinte. We will probably find out about each other in due course.

I am going to do some work on the wood over the winter. I may rebuild a few pieces using mahogany since it is more easily obtained and I think easier to work with than teak. Thanks for the sensible advice on checking drains. Remember, they are not self floating! Fill it with water and you will be swimming.

Dick
 
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