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Discussion Starter #1
We created a new Series all about Terrestrial Navigation:



First Video: The coordinate system longitude & latitude


Second Video: Map Selection and position plotting
 

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The video was well done. A couple of comments.

The video showed a fairly sporty looking beach cat. You then proceeded to do some position plotting on a relatively small scale chart in open water, offshore in the vicinity of a Traffic Separation Zone.

For small vessel navigation I will generally go electronic with a handheld GPS, but I realise electronics are beyond the scope of the video.

For small vessel pilotage I have three primary types of charts I use. You didn't really mention any of those options. For small vessel navigation my chart selection options might include;
-Waterproof strip charts contained in a waterproof chart display case lashed down to the tramp.
-8.5 x 11 chart and or google maps print outs formed into a booklet, also displayed in a chart case lashed down to the tramp
-I would consider a laminated chart book purchased from a third party (expensive)

For plotting on these small vessel charts, I probably wouldn't do anything, aside from maybe a mark 1 eyeball grease pencil mark.

The practice you show in your video is something I would more associate with cruising a large cruising vessel.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The video was well done. A couple of comments.

The video showed a fairly sporty looking beach cat. You then proceeded to do some position plotting on a relatively small scale chart in open water, offshore in the vicinity of a Traffic Separation Zone.

For small vessel navigation I will generally go electronic with a handheld GPS, but I realise electronics are beyond the scope of the video.

For small vessel pilotage I have three primary types of charts I use. You didn't really mention any of those options. For small vessel navigation my chart selection options might include;
-Waterproof strip charts contained in a waterproof chart display case lashed down to the tramp.
-8.5 x 11 chart and or google maps print outs formed into a booklet, also displayed in a chart case lashed down to the tramp
-I would consider a laminated chart book purchased from a third party (expensive)

For plotting on these small vessel charts, I probably wouldn't do anything, aside from maybe a mark 1 eyeball grease pencil mark.

The practice you show in your video is something I would more associate with cruising a large cruising vessel.
Thanks for the reply! The sporty Hobiecat is just the Intro to (almost) every Video on the channel and your absolutely correct the Navigation shown in the Video has nothing to do with that boat. The Series Terrestrial Navigation is meant for anyone who wants to learn about “analog” Navigation without electronics. We may cover the chart selection you mentioned in a future video! ;)

I also agree that it’s not necessarily practical with normal sailing cruisers but I think its nice to know how to do it, if everything else should fail!
 

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Worst explanation of latitude and longitude I have ever seen.
 

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Sorry, but you've pretty much started out on the wrong foot from the title.
terrestrial; "of or on dry land"
Then you wander off onto " “analog” Navigation without electronics." which I believe would be referred to in nautical parlance as DR, for dead reckoning and basic plotting.
 
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