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Hello Sailnet!


I had posted a few years back! The wife and I had bought a 1974 C&C 30. The boat was great but add 2 young kids to the mix and we found that we had very little time to take the "big" boat out sailing on Lake Champlain (VT/NY). This past weekend we sold the C&C 30.

The very next day I found and bought a 1983 O'Day Javelin (14ft)!!! She is a beauty! We are lucky enough to live on the water and I can just push her off the beach myself, get the rigging up in 10 minutes and be off! I actually took the boat out yesterday with almost zero wind and still had the biggest grin on my face.

I did have some questions about the rigging, was wondering if anyone could help us:

1. My main confusion comes from the outhaul. The mainsail clew has a line through it but the end of the boom has no block, just a carabiner and then there is no cleat to tie back on the boom. Anyone have pictures of what the end of their Javelin's boom looks like? I just jury rigged it to that carabiner but in more serious winds would like a more sturdy solution, am considering adding a small cleat to the end of the boom.

2. Do some people install a topping lift line from the top of the mast? I have to say I was confused by the sails being the only force holding the boom up and the boom flopping down into the cockpit when I released tension on the main halyard. I'd eventually like to keep the mainsail in some sort of bag on the boom and would rather not have if on the bottom of the cockpit that could get wet.

3. Do you guys with daysailers take off the jib and bag it every time or could I manually furl the jib around the forestay?

4. Lastly I plan to install a small electric trolling motor to get around more efficiently when the wind in our part of the bay dies down, would a 30lbs of thrust motor be sufficient for a 14 foot vessel with 475LBS displacement? I also plan to add lithium battery and a small solar panel to charge the battery (yes I know this is overkill). What are the chances of my capsizing the boat and the battery falling to the bottom of the lake? Is it possible to NEVER flip such a small boat? I'd probably somehow secure the battery in the little cubby. Could I drill small holes through the seating portion of the hull to run 12V wires aft?


Thanks for any input!


Pete
 

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My recollection is that Javelins had several different deck molds over its history. The earliest one had wooden floor boards and an open area under the foredeck. the second one had a fiberglass sole in the cockpit that was integral with the seats and small aft deck, and a bulkhead and to close the area under the forward deck. I think that the last deck mold did away with the small deck aft. My recollection is that all three had a way to mount a small outboard. It was assumed that the outboard had an integral fuel tank on first deck and probably the last. The deck mold with the aft deck assumed that a small tank could be stored under that deck. Some of the deck molds had a small locker in one of the seats, but all of them used the seats and the bow tank for buoyancy tanks so cutting into them is not a great idea.

Javelins can capsize, especially in a gusty sailing location like Lake Champlain so securing the outboard and batteries will be important.

I would probably remove the jib and bag it all the time. That said, I had a small daysailer with a jib bag that had a zipper on the opening that was arranged so that the bag could be put on the sail while it was hanked on and then zip up in front of the forestay. The aft end of the sail had a bail that the jib halyard could hook to and lift it off the deck and a light line that ran to the base of the mast that kept the jib bag from flopping around.

My recollection is that the original outhaul on the Javelin was pretty rudimentary. There was a cast aluminum end fitting that had an eye in it. A light line was tied to the clew of the sail, passed through that eye, back through the clew cringle and was tied with a couple half hitches at the clew. It wasn't adjustable when sailing.

A topping lift would be an unnecessary complication on a boat this size. Typically, when the sail is down, the boom is topped up by attaching the main halyard to the end of the boom at the outhaul fitting. (That is still done on race boats up to around 30 feet.) At that point a sail cover would work. If you are only single-handing you might want to add slugs on the mainsail as well. Other wise fold the head of the sail down to the foot and roll the sail up from the middle.

Jeff
 

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I've found that my 36 lb trolling motor is plenty of push for my SJ21, so I imagine the 30lb would be sufficient for your boat


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No problem putting a topping lift on a javelin. It probably makes sense.

I would expect a 30 lb trolling motor to push a Javelin between 2-3 knots. I wouldn't expect a lot of range. Maybe a couple of miles with a standard car battery.

I would say you could mostly avoid dumping a javelin, but I would secure the battery as if you were going to capsize. You wouldn't want to have a battery turn into a projectile if you did flip. You can get plastic battery boxes that work nicely.

I keep my beach cat rigged on the beach for the summer, but I take off both sails in between use. Main and jib.
 
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