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6. Each boat must have a permanently installed manual bilge pump which is operable from the
7. The boat shall have USCG approved sound devices, flares and fire extinguisher.
8. For PHRF Baywide, existing lifelines that meet PHRF standards are grandfathered but replacements cockpit with handle attached via catch or lanyard.
9. For PHRF Baywide, the engine must have fuel to run at the specified speed for 4 hours. For
For PHRF Baywide, a 11.5” radar reflector and suitable anchor chain and line shall be carried. must be to the new standards. Therefore if your old vinyl-covered lifeline fails it must be replaced with either bare stainless or HMPE of the size specified in the regulations. outboards with integral tanks and battery outboards, spare fuel and battery may be necessary.
Pretty sloppy proof reading in the above.. I think it should read:

6. Each boat must have a permanently installed manual bilge pump which is operable from the cockpit with handle attached via catch or lanyard.

7. The boat shall have USCG approved sound devices, flares and fire extinguisher.

8. For PHRF Baywide, existing lifelines that meet PHRF standards are grandfathered but replacements must be to the new standards. Therefore if your old vinyl-covered lifeline fails it must be replaced with either bare stainless or HMPE of the size specified in the regulations.

9. For PHRF Baywide, the engine must have fuel to run at the specified speed for 4 hours. For outboards with integral tanks and battery outboards, spare fuel and battery may be necessary.

10. For PHRF Baywide, a 11.5” radar reflector and suitable anchor chain and line shall be carried.


Agree that this was inevitable given the experiences of the last season's events...
 

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Kynntana (Freedom 38)
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Here's some background info, FYI (Safety-at-Sea) and the full list is here: http://media.ussailing.org/AssetFactory.aspx?vid=22647

October 23, 2013
Proposed U.S. Safety Equipment Requirements Approved by US Sailing Board of Directors

US Sailing’s Safety at Sea Committee has conducted an overhaul of ISAF’s Offshore Special Regulations (OSR), which describes the gear required to be used on sailboats when racing in most local and offshore races in the U.S. The U.S. Safety Equipment Requirements (USSER) document is intended to be used by race organizers, owners and boat inspectors. The proposed updates were approved by US Sailing’s Board of Directors last weekend at the organization’s Annual Meeting in Captiva, Fla. on Saturday, October 19.

Based on some excellent initial work by the Northern California Ocean Racing Council in 2012, the USSER sub-committee has completed an initial list of equipment and boat characteristics that will serve the needs of the majority of coastal and offshore racers in 2014.

The USSERs will be implemented by the 2014 Newport Bermuda Race, a preeminent offshore race. A US Sailing Safety at Sea Seminar will take place March 15-16, 2014 in Newport, R.I. The seminar will provide details on the new requirements to prospective racers.

The key differences between the US Safety Equipment Requirements (USSER) and the International Sailing Federation (ISAF) OSRs are as follows:

1. The requirements are easier for yacht owners and pre-race inspectors to understand.
2. The requirements are self-contained and do not refer to external documents.
3. The number of race categories has been reduced from seven to three: Nearshore, Coastal, and Ocean. Race organizers can then add or delete gear requirements based on the nature of their individual races.
4. The requirements are more specific about certain pieces of gear that lacked definition in the OSRs.
5. The OSRs contained both recommendations and requirements which proved confusing to users, and which increased the size of the document. The recommendations have been removed from the new version.
6. The requirements are far more compact, and can easily be included in their entirety in a Notice of Race or on a yacht club website.

Chuck Hawley, US Sailing's Safety at Sea Committee Chairman said, "One of the functions of the Safety at Sea Committee is to promote equipment requirements that are appropriate for the conditions, easily verified, and not excessive. I believe that the new USSERs meet those criteria, and will serve offshore sailors well. We encourage all Organizing Authorities to use them, edited if the local conditions warrant, so that races in the U.S. are sailed under consistent equipment rules."

As with any standards document, the USSER will be modified over time.
 

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Kynntana (Freedom 38)
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There are some work-arounds. For lifelines, instead of replacing the ones that are covered, I understand I can just remove the plastic covering to "uncoated stainless steel." There are some funny things such as a MOB pole. What do you do if you're single-handing? Yet, it still needs to be stored on deck and and ready to use...
 

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Pretty sloppy proof reading in the above.. I think it should read:

6. Each boat must have a permanently installed manual bilge pump which is operable from the cockpit with handle attached via catch or lanyard.

7. The boat shall have USCG approved sound devices, flares and fire extinguisher.

8. For PHRF Baywide, existing lifelines that meet PHRF standards are grandfathered but replacements must be to the new standards. Therefore if your old vinyl-covered lifeline fails it must be replaced with either bare stainless or HMPE of the size specified in the regulations.

9. For PHRF Baywide, the engine must have fuel to run at the specified speed for 4 hours. For outboards with integral tanks and battery outboards, spare fuel and battery may be necessary.

10. For PHRF Baywide, a 11.5” radar reflector and suitable anchor chain and line shall be carried.


Agree that this was inevitable given the experiences of the last season's events...
Uh...does anyone really think that these safety precautions are unreasonable? Especially #7, which I thought was required of all recreational vessels over a certain length, anyway?!?!?

Boater's Guide to Federal Safety Requirements
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The 2015 requirement for a handheld VHF with integral GPS strikes me as a little over the top but the rest seem fairly reasonable.
 

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Kynntana (Freedom 38)
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"...over a certain length" is the key distinction. These will apply no matter the size of the vessel.
 

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The changes don't seem very different from what has already been in effect for races around here. Based on the OP's link, it looks to me like we'll need to get a lanyard to attach the pump handle to something in the cockpit, ($0.75?) lash a sheath knife to the binnacle somewhere ($49.50?), and get a new handheld radio a year from now.($125.47, what with inflation?) If I'm going offshore and need to buy an 8-man liferaft - that's another story.
 

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Try complying with the offshore regs for a Catagory 1 race:

http://www.bermudaoceanrace.com/images/stories/pdfs/A2B-ISAFOSR2014draft1.pdf

The race committees want more participants but the cost of compliance gets more burdensome. I'm getting ready to build my emergency rudder, added AIS, had a second manual bilge pump operable from the cabin already aboard, bought an EPIRB, rented a life raft, am borrowing SOLAS flares and an offshore medical kit ... Don't ask me to translate that to dollars!
 

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We figured that to go on the Newport-Bermuda race in our boat it would cost us about $15-$20,000 for required gear and equipment upgrades. In addition to other stuff that would also be good ideas (new halyards, sheets, blocks...) Not counting the entry fee, training sessions, or ancillary items like hotels, dockage and food in Newport, Hamilton, and in between. If you have to ask how much it costs, you must like NASCAR. I'm looking to crew for someone else if they have a spot.
 

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I could no longer imagine doing Newport-Bermuda on the current boat (Olson 30), mainly because of one thing- the requirement of meeting the stability index. I'd have to probably add a bulb to my keel, which would destroy my hopes of ever selling the boat to anyone planning on racing one-design. That, and I'd pretty much suck wind for all the inshore racing that we currently do. The only long distance race on the east coast (till now) that doesn't require it is the Bermuda 1-2. I quickly read through the list of recommendations, and there's no way I'd ever be in compliance with either SI for ocean racing, and the limit for coastal is not likely. I seriously hope they reconsider, but maybe I'm missing something??
 

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I used to ocationally compete with PHRF fleets in small boats. For those, only items 1,4 and 11 make any sense at all. Similar for one-design.

Exemptions for small (dingy) no engine craft? Clearly, it would depend on whether it was a small course with chase boats or a distance race.
 

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The new electronics requirements seem unreasonable, in the abstract sense. But if you place them in context there have been a number of losses and investigations on the last 2-3 years and a lot of those have pointed at "Who? Where?" communications issues that could have easily been addressed, with lives saved, if these kind of regs had been in place. Is it appropriate to impose that burden for the sake of just a few lives, and the negative press that every death brings to the sport? Dunno.

What struck me more is that the cost of a Safety At Sea Seminar (I was at one of the very early ones when it was a Radical New Concept) has skyrocketed to MORE than the cost of the electronics they're requiring. Considering it used to be...what, $50 or $60 for the two day seminar, and maybe $600-800 for a GPS and VHF? And now the seminar and VHF+GPS are both matched at ~$250 or so?

Culture shock. Like paying $3.63 for a 28 cent gallon of gas. You tell me, which side of that picture is just wrong?
 

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All of the USSailing safety at sea seminars (especially those with the ISAF certs) all charge at least $125. The ISAF cert at the Annapolis marine trades association costs a total of $325. I'm guessing it goes to pay for flying in speakers and the use of equipment and in-water training. I'm sure the facilities rental is not cheap, and there aren't thousands of people signing up.
 

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USSA says about 1000 attend every year.
SAS Seminars
Given the requirements for % of crew and retaking, I'd expect more but apparently not.
I'd expect the $50 course today to be the four-hour shorty, the coastal class, rather than the full two-day hands-on?
And I won't even guess if they're using gen-you-whine-authorized repacks on the rafts.(G)
 

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Kynntana (Freedom 38)
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USSA says about 1000 attend every year.
SAS Seminars
Given the requirements for % of crew and retaking, I'd expect more but apparently not.
I'd expect the $50 course today to be the four-hour shorty, the coastal class, rather than the full two-day hands-on?
And I won't even guess if they're using gen-you-whine-authorized repacks on the rafts.(G)
The second day is optional. It's your money to spend however you choose :p
 
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