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Learning the HARD way...
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Termites, fungus and rot are not mentioned.
 

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美國佬
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Fake news. If those guys were really from Maryland, their names would be Tyrone and Darryl, not Liangbing and Teng. :D
 

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Any one want to take a guess at what the densification process entails? Wonder if they put the wood in an epoxy bath then pump up the pressure like they do to pressure treated wood.
 
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██▓▓▒▒░&
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I'm very unimpressed by the fact that there was not one actual fact about the process in the article. Which leads me to call it BS and CLICKBAIT and someone looking to raise investment dollars, with no real product involved.

If they really have anything, they've managed to be so vague as to ensure no one knows it.

Sounds like they have reinvented resin infused plywood or found a way to remineralize the wood, perhaps resulting in a "super lignin" in it. But so vague...that it qualifies are a pure BS article for the time being.

I'll bet they are never heard from again. Not next month, not next year, they just join the list of high tech nonsense claims that never pan out.

There's no there there. Many words, no facts. That's not journalism, it is a marketing press release.
 

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still boatless
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Fake news. If those guys were really from Maryland, their names would be Tyrone and Darryl, not Liangbing and Teng.
You must not visit many graduate schools in the US. It says they're from University of Maryland. It doesn't say they were born and raised in Ellicott City, although even that is possible.
 

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still boatless
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I'm very unimpressed by the fact that there was not one actual fact about the process in the article. Which leads me to call it BS and CLICKBAIT and someone looking to raise investment dollars, with no real product involved.

If they really have anything, they've managed to be so vague as to ensure no one knows it.

Sounds like they have reinvented resin infused plywood or found a way to remineralize the wood, perhaps resulting in a "super lignin" in it. But so vague...that it qualifies are a pure BS article for the time being.

I'll bet they are never heard from again. Not next month, not next year, they just join the list of high tech nonsense claims that never pan out.

There's no there there. Many words, no facts. That's not journalism, it is a marketing press release.

It is a press release, absolutely, and it's even identified as such. However, if you actually go de-reference the publication citation at the bottom, you can see that it is real. You might not like the press release, but you should then read the actual publication.

https://www.nature.com/articles/nature25476

The process is essentially to first boil wood in a solution of sodium hydroxide and sodium sulfite, and then compress it under pressure.

That first phase is not so very different than how papermaking pulp is prepared from wood today, and for the same reason. Have you ever smelled a paper mill? That's the chemicals that break down the lignin in the wood.

Basically what these guys are doing is breaking down the lignin and hemicellulose, then crushing the wood until the cell walls collapse, leaving an extremely dense cellulose composite.

Nothing to be enraged about.
 

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still boatless
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still boatless
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Termites, fungus and rot are not mentioned.
Well, first off, the publishing of an academic paper on the basis of lab experiments, is a long way from usable products out in the real world. (Although the press release did mention that U of MD is spinning out a company for these kinds of products.) It will take time for peer reviews of the paper, and duplication of results, to come in -- and then still longer before there is any meaningful production.

Now, if I understand this correctly -- and I might not! -- the product in question might be more prone to microbial and fungal breakdown, since it is predicated on the removal of lignin and hemicellulose. The remaining polymer, cellulose, is essentially a very long, long-chain carbohydrate, and thus many forms of microbes secrete enzymes capable of breaking it down.

I also infer (and again, perhaps incorrectly) that their densification technique is better suited to soft "junky" woods like aspen, alder, basswood, and so on -- because those have less dense and less complex lignin polymers, than rot-resistant tropical hardwoods like teak, mahogany, acacia, Handroanthus aka "ipe" or "Brazilian walnut", massaranduba, and so on, because these woods contain extremely heavy and complex lignin polymers.

In other words, they might actually be removing whatever rot resistance the original wood had to begin with.
 

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So you make a very ridged female mould. The magic wood slurry? is extruded by a 3d printer nozzle fastened to the front of the heated platen which spreads and cures the product.while injecting a carbon fibre cross hatch to the matrix. The over head computerized arm is supplied from big tanks of goop so as to supply the growing market of mass produced vessels. Better than rotomoulding thermo plastic which is so passe. or hand laying of epoxied wood veneer as in quality classic examples.
 

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美國佬
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You must not visit many graduate schools in the US. It says they're from University of Maryland. It doesn't say they were born and raised in Ellicott City, although even that is possible.
I went back and inserted an emoji for you.
 
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