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SaltwaterSuzi/CapnLarry
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Hi, Sailnetters,

Just reading my latest copy of Scientific American and there's an article about a new theory about seasickness. There's a reprint on the net at:


It seems that you have a better chance of avoiding seasickness if your stance offers a better posture. Yet another good reason for leg spreading.

But seriously, for years I believed that seasickness and motion sickness in general was caused by conflicting sensory input. Your inner ear senses rocking, but the eye sees none. And for some reason the brain thinks an appropriate response is to empty the contents of the stomach. If this theory proves correct, my belief system has suffered another blow.

Just goes to prove what I've always maintained,

"We are all victims of the lies we choose to believe."
 

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I totally agree with this theory. All my experience with motion sickness -- usually when I'm tired and riding the bus -- first begins as a sensation of muscles straining to keep my body in whatever position I'm trying to keep it in. This sensation gradually evolves into feelings of fatigue and strain in the core muscles that surround my guts and esophagus, which translates in my brain into nausea. Would anybody else who experiences motion sickenss (even slightly) agree with this description?
 

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When I was young, I never got motion sickness. I could read in the car in the back seat, fly in a small plane, go on rides at the fair, etc. The older I got, the more "prone" to motion sickness I got. Even though I would classify it as mild. Now, as a result, I won't go on those crazy rides at the fair, and flying in a small plane - though still enjoyable - isn't as exciting as it once was.

So when I took up sailing, with very little prior on-the-water experience, I was worried that seasickness might be a problem. Especially after reading that it happens to a lot of people, even sailing veterans, on the first few days of a long ocean passage. But one of the things I did read was that some people said "don't fight it". I took that as kind of an "embrace it" approach. Not too embrace seasickness, but rather embrace the environment and the motion as an integral part of it.

So I count myself as fortunate, in that I haven't (knock on my head, I mean, knock on wood) had any bouts of seasickness. And rarely even suffer any form of motion sickness, even on a nasty crossing of the Strait of Juan de Fuca with steep 10'-15' following seas. My wife and her daughter weren't as fortunate...

I do agree with the stance issue. I have always had that kind of stance when sailing. I guess it has helped. Interesting that the article made no mention of being properly hydrated. We always feel that having enough water in our systems helps us.
 

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I'm not buying this one. There's not much in that link that is definitive. Saying people don't get seasick underwater is just wrong. There is also no comments on how current medications help to avoid seasickness if it was caused by what he says.

Paul L
 

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SaltwaterSuzi/CapnLarry
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Discussion Starter #5
Paul,

I see what you mean - however, some of the remedies - those pressure point wrist bands, for instance, I believe are nothing more than placebo effect. I never heard of anyone getting seasick underwater - claustrophobic when diving deep maybe. Have you gotten seasick underwater? I'm not arguing - just curious, 'cause I haven't heard of it.
 

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Sadly I must say I know a guy, whom got seasick under water, while diving. My brother in law tells the stupid story fifty times a year. I was there and watched him vomit through his regulator, take a gulp of air, and repeat, and repeat... calm boat dive 15 minutes out of the marina.
 

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AEOLUS II
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My wife never got seasick before.

But several years ago it struck.

Nice day on the Bay, time for lunch...

Greek Chicken salad wrap + apple + Moxie = :puke

Poor thing.

:laugher
 

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I allways get a bit seasick when cleaning the bottom


On sailboats it depends on the boat size even in the same weather conditions and am i bit more likely to get sick on bigger boats BUT i am usally bow man and there is more motion in the bigger boat
 

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I broke an ear drum while diving, lost my orientation and started spinning...when I vomited I spit out my regulator.
My dive buddy grabbed me and took me to the surface before I drowned.
I always had trouble clearing before that and he knew it.
Quick thinking on his part saved my life that day.
I've never dove since.
 

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hmmm...interesting theories all: I would love to interject on a personal as well as a professional basis.
1. More than one cause for seasickness.
2. to refute a point made earlier.....I have gotten seasick under water.
In addition fish can also get sea sick.
3. For some folks the stimulus seems to be in the digestive system. Some the olfactory, some the vesitbular aparatus in the ear.
4. When you can determine the type of stimulus needed to trigger the mal du mer then you can effectively treat it with the appropriate regime. That is why folks swear by different remedies. Not because of the placebo effect but because they figured out what works for them. Unfortunately medical science (a misnomer) does not yet have the tools and or drive to be able to differentiate.
5. Why yes, I do play a doc on tv.
 

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hmmm...interesting theories all: I would love to interject on a personal as well as a professional basis.
1. More than one cause for seasickness.
2. to refute a point made earlier.....I have gotten seasick under water.
In addition fish can also get sea sick.
3. For some folks the stimulus seems to be in the digestive system. Some the olfactory, some the vesitbular aparatus in the ear.
4. When you can determine the type of stimulus needed to trigger the mal du mer then you can effectively treat it with the appropriate regime. That is why folks swear by different remedies. Not because of the placebo effect but because they figured out what works for them. Unfortunately medical science (a misnomer) does not yet have the tools and or drive to be able to differentiate.
5. Why yes, I do play a doc on tv.
 

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Seasickness underwater is unlikely to be related directly to motion... it can occur when cold water reaches the inner ear due to a ruptured eardrum, as mentioned above, or simply due to the cold reaching through even in the absence of a rupture, and the body tenses up while trying to balance itself with a paralyzed vestibular apparatus. It could also conceivably be an affect of hypoxia or nitrogen narcosis, maybe?
 
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