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Hi all,


Myself and my partner have been giving the liveaboard life some thought now for around a year.

We both love to travel, and have been on boats but no active sailing experience yet, which we are trying to get now but then covid happened!

We've started saving towards a boat and have done a fair amount of research, but there doesn't seem to be an exhaustive list of headroom on boats anywhereeeee and its irritating to say the least.

So my question to you:

Is there a full time liveaboard blue water capable cruiser out there (not afraid of having to kit out a production boat if necessary) typically within a £35-£100 price range that can accommodate his 6'7 headroom? The boats we have viewed so far have been lacking in the height department.

I understand catalinas tend to have good headroom though most of them are in the US at the moment which we just can't get to in light of the recent restrictions.

Happy to look at cats and mono's though I understand cats are more expensive.

Best wishes

Sadie
 

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6'7" is a tall order, even for a Catalina. They may top out at 6'4" IIRC. The best option may be for you to look around more near you and better define exactly what you want from what you like or don't like. If you're thinking of living aboard, you don't want to make a snap decision. If you don't know much about sailing, you might want to learn more first. Some people spend more than a year looking for the boat that's right for them.
 

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Our 53 footer can only accommodate 6'2" which I believe is pretty standard. You might try looking for a custom built boat?
But, as stated above, it might be best to get some sailing experience first.
In your situation my suggestion would be to buy a 15 foot or smaller very cheap dinghy that's pretty beat up, but serviceable. This is not going to be a boat to take your friends out on, but instead you will be crashing into docks, running aground and even tipping her over on occasion (this can be fun on a hot day in warmer water). This is the boat to make all your beginner's mistakes on, before you buy a nicer, more expensive boat. And believe me, if you start with the more expensive boat, you are still going to make all the same mistakes, classes or not, but the repair bills will be much more expensive, and if you load the boat up with friends, there is the possibility of someone getting hurt. Sailing isn't rocket science, but it does take a lot of sailing to get it.
This is how almost every professional sailor of note learned to sail, not through some expensive cookie cutter course.
Along with your little beater, I would highly recommend a great little book called Royce's Sailing Illustrated, a fun yet very comprehensive book filled with important information for the novice sailor or experienced professional. No massive preachy tome this, just a well put together book with everything from rigging, docking and even splicing. I've been using it to teach sailing for over 45 years, and still refer to it now and then, myself.

As you gain sailing experience, and spend time with other sailors, either just chatting, or sailing on their boats, you'll gain a much better idea of the bigger boat you will actually want to own
 

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S2 7.9 Bear Lake, UT
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One of t
[QUOTE="SadieThom93, post: 2051688538, member: 528082"
Is there a full time liveaboard blue water capable cruiser out there (not afraid of having to kit out a production boat if necessary) typically within a £35-£100 price range that can accommodate his 6'7 headroom? The boats we have viewed so far have been lacking in the height department.

[/QUOTE]

One of the things that define a bluewater cruiser is good working space in rough conditions and efficient use of space for storage. If a boat were to accommodate his height the handholds common on the ceiling of a boat would be out of reach for boaters of average height. I know of a guy to buy a specific boat that was custom built with a lowered sole (floor) to make it comfortable for a 6'4" person. It would not be too hard to alter the right boat to allow a bunk (bed) for your guy but standing headroom would be a very hard find.
 

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Capta's advice is spot on, especially the part about a small boat. It's much easier to get a feel for how the wind & the boat work together in something small & the investment/risk are much much less. How sure are you that you want/need a "blue-water" boat, given that you have not yet really started sailing? Until you know that you are really planning on doing that kind of sailing it might make more sense to look at the far wider variety of coastal cruising boats around, especially given the headroom you are looking for. And the wider you cast your net, the more different boats you'll see & the better chance of finding something that makes sense for you.
 

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6'7" is a tall order, even for a Catalina. They may top out at 6'4" IIRC. The best option may be for you to look around more near you and better define exactly what you want from what you like or don't like. If you're thinking of living aboard, you don't want to make a snap decision. If you don't know much about sailing, you might want to learn more first. Some people spend more than a year looking for the boat that's right for them.
it's better to not buy a boat for some reasonable dislike than buy the wrong one.
 

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the perfect boat doesn't exist. There is a fine line, but a big difference between a real good live-a-board and a fast easy boat that can hit all points of the wind. It's a give and take.
 

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Hi all,


Myself and my partner have been giving the liveaboard life some thought now for around a year.

We both love to travel, and have been on boats but no active sailing experience yet, which we are trying to get now but then covid happened!

We've started saving towards a boat and have done a fair amount of research, but there doesn't seem to be an exhaustive list of headroom on boats anywhereeeee and its irritating to say the least.

So my question to you:

Is there a full time liveaboard blue water capable cruiser out there (not afraid of having to kit out a production boat if necessary) typically within a £35-£100 price range that can accommodate his 6'7 headroom? The boats we have viewed so far have been lacking in the height department.

I understand catalinas tend to have good headroom though most of them are in the US at the moment which we just can't get to in light of the recent restrictions.

Happy to look at cats and mono's though I understand cats are more expensive.

Best wishes

Sadie
Bristol Channel Cutters have some plans with 6'6" headroom and they are the tallest coach roof height I know of.

 

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You can probably get 6'4-5 headroom. Island packets, Baba's, the larger Catalinas. I'm 6'4 and I live on a boat with 6'3 headroom. You bang your head the first month but rarely after. Really the only time your standing for more than a minute is in the galley. More important than headroom imo is having a long enough berth for sleeping.
 
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