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cruising all I can
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955 Posts
Everyone has a story about buying a really inexpensive boat and sailing away to low budget bliss, but if you're bringing a large group onto a boat to live full time the cost and complexity will increase exponentially unless you're all hippies and like living out of each other pockets. Nothing wrong with that - don't get me wrong. I'm all for that. But someone with no boating experience who wants to house 4 people on a sailboat, and sail it places, needs to think long and hard about the safety and integrity of the boat and whatever systems are on board as well as the bare minimum living arrangements that can be tolerated.

All you HAVE to have is an intact hull, rig, and sails. Paper charts and a pocket GPS. A skillet and a bucket and some dog bowls to eat slop out of. That's all you HAVE to have. Anything more than that and it gets weird really fast. If the OP buys a typical 35' - 45' tired cruising boat (the kind he will be able to afford) it will be loaded with stuff that will either need to be repaired, or ripped out and done away with. You absolutely can go minimalist - you can go engineless (if the marina allows it - many absolutely do not) with no electronics other than a handheld VHF. It's perfectly possible to play Swallows and Amazons but working adults get tired of it after a week or so.
That's what's referred to as " taking it to the extreme".
There's a lot of grey area in living aboard convenience and accommodations.
I've met sailors who wouldn't consider being without refrigeration.
A family of 4 lived/ cruised for 2 years aboard a 30' steel ketch( very close)
Each person finds their comfort level, as well as budget .
The determination I've come to is it will cost " all that you have" whether that's $1000 or a million , the goldfish syndrome persists.
 

Administrator
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Now it seems, it's unheard of to cast off without $10,000 worth of satellite guidance ais, and locator beacons.
Yep, about $10k all up.
And anyone who goes cruising with long passages is a real dill if they don't have this kit.

AIS is essential. Absolutely. And it's obligitory in some Asian countries. It certainly should be for all private vessels heading more than 5nms to sea.
As should EPIRB, satellite communications and the full ability to download weather at sea. This means a proper grib file not the useless VHF reports.

Numbers of deaths of sailors has dropped dramatically over the last 20-30 years but there's much more we can/should be doing.

And paper charts should be utterly banned unless in a frame and stuck on a wall as decoration!

Mark 馃槉
 

cruising all I can
Joined
955 Posts
Yep, about $10k all up.
And anyone who goes cruising with long passages is a real dill if they don't have this kit.

AIS is essential. Absolutely. And it's obligitory in some Asian countries. It certainly should be for all private vessels heading more than 5nms to sea.
As should EPIRB, satellite communications and the full ability to download weather at sea. This means a proper grib file not the useless VHF reports.

Numbers of deaths of sailors has dropped dramatically over the last 20-30 years but there's much more we can/should be doing.

And paper charts should be utterly banned unless in a frame and stuck on a wall as decoration!

Mark 馃槉
Bless your heart.
 

Master Mariner
Joined
9,147 Posts
Really?
I'm amused at how people attempt to present simple activities in a setting to make them appear mire complex than they actually are.
People have been travelling the waters of this planet on literal rafts for centuries.
Suddenly it's untenable without cartography and satellite navigation?
Hardly.
You were the one bragging that you used out of date cartography when you can keep them up to date for free. Are you just too lazy, or didn't you know that?
As for rafts, we met the Las Balsas Expedition off Bora Bora as they passed on their way to Oz. Got to see that ancient mode of seafaring first hand and up close.
Not my style though, and I was really happy I was aboard a Wm. Hand gaff ketch launched in 1909, with all her amenities. Kerosene lighting throughout, including the binnacle and running lights. One solitary 12vdc light over the chart table. Sadly, they hadn't invented the pressure water stuff, so we had to wash one hand while pumping with the other. Amenities, my ass.
 

cruising all I can
Joined
955 Posts
You were the one bragging that you used out of date cartography when you can keep them up to date for free. Are you just too lazy, or didn't you know that?
As for rafts, we met the Las Balsas Expedition off Bora Bora as they passed on their way to Oz. Got to see that ancient mode of seafaring first hand and up close.
Not my style though, and I was really happy I was aboard a Wm. Hand gaff ketch launched in 1909, with all her amenities. Kerosene lighting throughout, including the binnacle and running lights. One solitary 12vdc light over the chart table. Sadly, they hadn't invented the pressure water stuff, so we had to wash one hand while pumping with the other. Amenities, my ass.
I'm still using footpumps at the galley, using both hands to wash, except when I'm using one to " hang on".
As per being " Lazy", I'm trying to be, I need more time to practice.
 

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Yep, about $10k all up.
And anyone who goes cruising with long passages is a real dill if they don't have this kit.

AIS is essential. Absolutely. And it's obligitory in some Asian countries. It certainly should be for all private vessels heading more than 5nms to sea.
As should EPIRB, satellite communications and the full ability to download weather at sea. This means a proper grib file not the useless VHF reports.

Mark 馃槉
No, no, no...haven't you heard? All you need is a cedar bucket and a ukelele! A kerosene lantern and a fishing pole! You need to "get with the now", man - you're too uptight!
 
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