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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My husband went to the boat today and grabbed the sails along with some other stuff to get cleaned up and start getting it ready. We were told when we bought the boat, it had a new main sail, new spinniker and a older but decent jib.

Not completely sure that is what we have. Measurements of this sail is 12 feet from foot to clew and 25 feet from foot to the head and has 2 sheets attached to the clew. What kind of sail is this?




This is a bit smaller. 9 by 20 which is only a bit bigger than our main sail. Our main is 8x20 What sail is this?



And last what is this for? My husband thinks it connects to the clue end of the boom?

 

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The leading edge of a (triangular) sail is the luff, the trailing edge is the leech, the bottom edge is the foot. The top corner is the head, the forward bottom corner is the tack, and the trailing bottom corner is the clew.

The first three pictures look like jibs of different sizes. Your husband is probably right, the last picture looks like the mainsheet, complete with the appropriate gear.

I don't see a spinnaker in your pictures.
 

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ASA and PSIA Instructor
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If your boat has a J of 9.25' than this would something like a 110% jib, which would be generally terms a working jib. You can put the dimensions in a sail calculator to get it exact. This is a good size for having only one.
If that tackle goes to the end of the boom, it probably is in fact the mainsheet. If it connects to the middle, it'd be a boom vang.

Get signed up for a class...?

r
 

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Barquito
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Agree. Get signed up for a class, or bring an experienced sailor along when you do go out. However, I think it is a good idea to spend time messing around on your boat trying to identify stuff, just as you are doing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Agree. Get signed up for a class, or bring an experienced sailor along when you do go out. However, I think it is a good idea to spend time messing around on your boat trying to identify stuff, just as you are doing.
We do have an experienced sailor that will be coming with us and showing us how to sail once we are launched on May 1st. But in the mean time we are trying to learn what we can so we have some clue as to what they are talking about when they are teaching us. We have already learned so much by reading, watching videos and asking on here. Now I think it is just a matter of going out and doing it, especially since we have someone willing to teach us when we're ready. Can't wait for the warmer weather. Feels like the never ending winter here.
 

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Swab
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We do have an experienced sailor that will be coming with us and showing us how to sail ...
Personally, and this may be just me, I would hire a professional sailing instructor or go through an ASA course.

I say this only based on personal experience watching a marina neighbor go through the process. She had turned down my "If you need a hand with that..." offer of help saying "Oh no thanks My friend knows all about boats and is coming to show me everything".

When the friend arrived I observed from the comfort of my cockpit with a cold brew and a nice Punch double corona. The knowledgeable friend went about instructing the new boat owner in all things nautical but was stymied when the boat refused to back out of the slip. After twenty minutes or so of trouble shooting and attempting to diagnose the problem they asked me if I knew anything about engines and transmissions and such and could I please help figure out why the boat would not go in reverse. I paused thoughtfully, popped open another brewski and suggested they untie the dock lines. :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Personally, and this may be just me, I would hire a professional sailing instructor or go through an ASA course.

I say this only based on personal experience watching a marina neighbor go through the process. She had turned down my "If you need a hand with that..." offer of help saying "Oh no thanks My friend knows all about boats and is coming to show me everything".

When the friend arrived I observed from the comfort of my cockpit with a cold brew and a nice Punch double corona. The knowledgeable friend went about instructing the new boat owner in all things nautical but was stymied when the boat refused to back out of the slip. After twenty minutes or so of trouble shooting and attempting to diagnose the problem they asked me if I knew anything about engines and transmissions and such and could I please help figure out why the boat would not go in reverse. I paused thoughtfully, popped open another brewski and suggested they untie the dock lines. :cool:
lol, i'm sorry but that was funny. :D - a friend of my husbands wife was the capt. of a sailing team in college and they had owned a sail boat until recently when they were "forced" to sell when they moved. That being said, if the "lessons" don't work out we have been looking into places for more formal training if need be. We have owned motor boats before so we do know the basics. We have just never owned a sailboat.
 

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Corsair 24
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AJAJAJAJAJAJAJA! nice
 

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yes, they are all headsails, the 1st one is roughly a 150. The 150's on my Catalina 22 were like 24x12, the 100 or 100 was like 10x22.5. The leading edge will have bronze hanks on it and obviously the sheets/lines are in the back.

The last picture is you mainsheet and related mechanical blocks...

As someone that took ASA class 101 & 103 and then 6 subsequent lessons on my own boat, I don't think a couple afternoons with your "friend" is nearly enough schooling...
 
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