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How do the following talk to each other?
1. Tiller Pilot (TP22)
2. Depth Sounder
3. Knot Meter
4. iPad
5. Garmin Glo (Blue tooth GPS feed to ipad)
6. Radio w/AIS (Standard Horizon GX 2150)

Can the VHF w/AIS talk to the TP22 and make it change course if the AIS sees a vessel in a certain perimeter?

Can the iPad which has the Garmin Glo GPS signal talk to or listen to anything else?
 

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Baba 35
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NMEA is just an attempt to standardize a communication protocol between multi-platform devices (Ie. Think Esperanto for boat electronics). Its up to the actual device to decide what it wants to do with that information. The general rule of thumb is that if the hardware has a screen its usually just reading the NMEA data, if it doesnt its a sensor thats sending data.

Typically if you have devices from different vendors, you have to throw in a NEMA backbone of some sort for all of them to talk to each other nicely. Once you get that down you can focus on what each device should be telling other devices. It gets more complicated of course when you have one system that although using NMEA, has some proprietary element about it (Raymarine Cables, B&G closed-source wifi etc etc).

In the GX 2150's case it is just listening to AIS information and from what I have read of the tech specs, can only act on that information within the confines of its own abilities. Such as making a DSC call to what it shows you on its own AIS screen. It will let you use functions based on incoming data, but it will not tell other devices what to do.

I am pretty sure that the iPad can just read NMEA data and not send it, with exception of a few recent apps perhaps, but its not something that I would even experiment with unless if it was part of a well funded software suite (MaxSea, RayTalk etc etc).

NMEA is a really cool idea on paper, but unfortunately most hardware vendors support it to comply with the standard, but rarely go out of their way to interact with hardware other than their own. Which makes total sense really, if you were Raymarine would you be happy if someone bought your plotter, but then grabbed cheaper instruments, radar dome and transducers from another manufacturer? Heres a great example of the ultimate outcome of that dilemma.
 
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first sailed january 2008
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I have it and it works great. It just has to be set up perfectly. I have units from all different manufacturers.

I see your point about a manufacturer wanting to lock you into their system. All raymarine or whatever and you can do that. But at the same time, as a company, say someone already had all lowrance but really wanted that raymarine tillerpilot. Wouldn't you want them to buy yours and have it work? Maybe you'll like it enough to buy more raymarine next time.
 

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Mermaid Hunter
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5,686 Posts
Can the VHF w/AIS talk to the TP22 and make it change course if the AIS sees a vessel in a certain perimeter?
I've worked with autonomous vehicles in the past. Even with a complete sensor suite including radar and "smart" charts recreational boat electronics don't have anything like the capacity to make decisions like that. Where are the rocks? Other vessels that don't have AIS? Shallows? How is sail trimmed managed.

Track following is dangerous enough without adding automated decision-making.
 

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Hey,

Marine devices 'speak' to each other using a marine network. There are two basic kinds of networks: NMEA 0183 (older) NMEA 2000 (newer).

The Simard TP22 can use NMEA 0183 or Simnet, which is Simrads version of NMEA 2000.

I don't know what kind of depth sounds or know meter you have, so I don't know which network to recommend.

As previously mentioned, the VHF / AIS radio does not provide any information to your tiller pilot. The radio should be connected to some device that has GPS information. The radio can put AIS information onto the network so other devices can display that AIS information. The Standard Horizon radio is NMEA 0183 only, so your best bet is to use that networking. To use your IPad will require some sore of a wifi getway that is NMEA 0183 on one side and wifi on the other so it can send / receive data to the IPad. I think that Actisense makes those but I am not familiar with any of that stuff.

Note that it can get real expensive real fast to get all the devices communicating.....

I am in the process of installing a new autopilot on my boat. I have bought the Raymarine Evolution Wheel pilot. My existing instruments are Raymarine ST 60 speed, depth and wind, and a Garmin chartplotter. To get all the instruments sharing data, I am using NMEA 2000 networking, a combination of Garmin NMEA 2000 and Raymaine Seatalk NG (Ray's version of NMEA 2000). I needed to buy a converter kit so the Raymarine ST60 speed, depth and wind instruments can put their information onto the NMEA 2000 bus, a converter cable so the Garmin plotter can be on the bus, and I have also purchased a Simrad VHF that does AIS and uses NMEA 2000. The whole system should be up in another few days.

Good luck,
Barry

How do the following talk to each other?
1. Tiller Pilot (TP22)
2. Depth Sounder
3. Knot Meter
4. iPad
5. Garmin Glo (Blue tooth GPS feed to ipad)
6. Radio w/AIS (Standard Horizon GX 2150)

Can the VHF w/AIS talk to the TP22 and make it change course if the AIS sees a vessel in a certain perimeter?

Can the iPad which has the Garmin Glo GPS signal talk to or listen to anything else?
 

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How do the following talk to each other?
1. Tiller Pilot (TP22)
2. Depth Sounder
3. Knot Meter
4. iPad
5. Garmin Glo (Blue tooth GPS feed to ipad)
6. Radio w/AIS (Standard Horizon GX 2150)

Can the VHF w/AIS talk to the TP22 and make it change course if the AIS sees a vessel in a certain perimeter?

Can the iPad which has the Garmin Glo GPS signal talk to or listen to anything else?
It's not entirely clear to me what you are looking for.
I think it will several years before we get boats that don't need a responsible person on watch.

It's possible to program a system to "change course if the AIS sees a vessel in a certain perimeter"
But would you make sure that the course change does not bring you onto collision course with a boat that's not equipped with AIS?

A normal AIS setup is to have the AIS display unit calculate CPA and TCPA and sound an alarm when the trigger values have been reached.
More on CPA/TCPA here CPA and TCPA Alarms Explained | Digital Yacht Ltd

In a NMEA 2000 network devices that have information will broadcast this onto the network and devices that can use this information receive and process it.

Information from sensors like
Depth Sounder
Knot Meter
GPS
Can be used and/or displayed by all units on the network.
 

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thanks. a lot of great information here. need to step back and study.

trying to figure out a low cost, minimalist option (without compromising safety).
Thinking low cost I would say

1. Tiller Pilot (TP22)
Does not need any integration at all

2. Depth Sounder
3. Knot Meter
Have their own displays in cockpit, no need for integration.

4. iPad
I have noe personal experience with this.
You plan to run navigation software on this?
The iPad have it's own GPS?

5. Garmin Glo (Blue tooth GPS feed to ipad)
Unknown to me

6. Radio w/AIS (Standard Horizon GX 2150)
Must be connected to GPS
Is NMEA 0183 only, It's possible to interface this with the iPad but you would need some more components (at a cost)
This VHF will calculate CPA/TCPA and give alarm
With the "optional RAM3 mic with AIS" in the cockpit you will basic AIS functionality in the cockpit.
 

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NMEA is just an attempt to standardize a communication protocol between multi-platform devices (Ie. Think Esperanto for boat electronics). Its up to the actual device to decide what it wants to do with that information. The general rule of thumb is that if the hardware has a screen its usually just reading the NMEA data, if it doesnt its a sensor thats sending data.

Typically if you have devices from different vendors, you have to throw in a NEMA backbone of some sort for all of them to talk to each other nicely. Once you get that down you can focus on what each device should be telling other devices. It gets more complicated of course when you have one system that although using NMEA, has some proprietary element about it (Raymarine Cables, B&G closed-source wifi etc etc).

In the GX 2150's case it is just listening to AIS information and from what I have read of the tech specs, can only act on that information within the confines of its own abilities. Such as making a DSC call to what it shows you on its own AIS screen. It will let you use functions based on incoming data, but it will not tell other devices what to do.

I am pretty sure that the iPad can just read NMEA data and not send it, with exception of a few recent apps perhaps, but its not something that I would even experiment with unless if it was part of a well funded software suite (MaxSea, RayTalk etc etc).

NMEA is a really cool idea on paper, but unfortunately most hardware vendors support it to comply with the standard, but rarely go out of their way to interact with hardware other than their own. Which makes total sense really, if you were Raymarine would you be happy if someone bought your plotter, but then grabbed cheaper instruments, radar dome and transducers from another manufacturer? Heres a great example of the ultimate outcome of that dilemma.
B&G closed source WiFi? What's the issue?
 

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thanks. a lot of great information here. need to step back and study.

trying to figure out a low cost, minimalist option (without compromising safety).
At this point in time I don't think that integrating iPads or other consumer electronics is the lowest cost option. The least expensive networked chart plotters are down around $500-$600. Getting an iPad, waterproofing it (in a way that still allows it to be powered), adding chart software, and adding a NMEA<->WiFi gateway to allow it to talk to your instruments will cost about double the cost of the basic chart plotter.

If you already have the iPad you can use it to interact with most modern plotters. My Raymarine e7d lets you connect over WiFi from any iOS or Android device and see and do exactly what you can see and do from the device's screen. The Raymarine A65/A67 does exactly the same and has been getting sold for as little as $550. Raymarine is giving away US charts right now, which makes that a screaming deal for a nice plotter. A downside of the A65/A67 compared to the E models is that it only does NMEA 2000, not NMEA 0183. Simrad and Lowrance make AIS receiver radios that will talk NMEA 2000 instead of 0183. The first versions of these were really flakey, but the newer ones work well (and they replaced the initial ones for free).
 
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