SailNet Community banner
1 - 20 of 51 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello from Montana.
I've been lurking in some forums for quite awhile, still don't know much. If anything.
Planning on selling it all and buying a boat. After all my reading and research I am looking for a Tartan 34. Seems like the ideal boat for me and my plans. Any help in finding a decent one somewhere south of $20,000 would be greatly appreciated. I'm not afraid of a little work, or even a lot of work, I feel pretty confident that I can do pretty much any repair myself. Anyway, I'm Paul and look forward to joining the fairly amazing and inspiring community.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,376 Posts
Try to charter a Tartan 34 before buying one. Then charter a bunch of boats with different deck and interior layouts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've spent a lot of time on power boats. Did a lot of camping for week to 2 week trips on my 20' bayliner cuddy cabin. Never been on a sailboat before. For work I am always on the road. Used to live in a 24' camper for months even a couple year long jobs. I don't know, but I think some of that will have helped prepare me for life on a sailboat. I don't claim to be right all the time however.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Chartering really isn't an option. Going all out. I understand why you bring up chartering and if I could I definitely would. So yes, I am one of the poor people that get on a forum and get berated for trying. I'm committed and willing to weather it. I do believe there will be some support and useful information and advice. I look forward to it all.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,073 Posts
Paul'

If I may be so bold, consider buying a trailer sailor in the 23 foot range. Inexpensive to buy and maintain and many to choose from. Take a class or two and sail your aft off. Make all those newbie mistakes that some of us are willing to admit. Loose some gelcoat, your lunch, and a little bit of pride. After a few years if you still love it, trade up for bigger prizes.

Don
 

·
Senior Smart Aleck
Joined
·
2,150 Posts
...look forward to joining the fairly amazing and inspiring community.
Are we talking about the same forum?:)

There is not much sailing in Montana. Where do you plan to start your journey?

There is a Tartan 34C in Annapolis with your name on it, coincidentally for $20K:

1974 Tartan 34C sailboat for sale in Maryland

Go for it! You are a man with a plan...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
431 Posts
Welcome, Paul!
Not to feed the addiction or anything..
Tartan T34C, 1971, Arnold, Maryland, sailboat for sale from Sailing Texas, yacht for sale
I would definitely get a survey. You can save time learning about the boat's systems just by being on site for the survey.

BTW, I do not know that particular boat or its owner. I have been on one, and that is a spacious boat. Wouldn't feel comfortable docking it solo in wind or current, but your skills may adjust at a faster rate than mine.

And like jameswilson said, where do you plan to start?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #10 ·
You may ...
I'm more than certain I will have mistakes, lost lunches, a few scratches (me and the boat), and my pride has never really concerned me much. Although I do blush....
I really have made up my mind and plan on going all in. Never was good at just settling or going halfway.
I don't suppose too many people will get it or understand, but I have never felt like something was more suited to me.
I really don't feel like I have too much to lose other than time, which is important to me, and money, which has never really interested me much.

Paul'

If I may be so bold, consider buying a trailer sailor in the 23 foot range. Inexpensive to buy and maintain and many to choose from. Take a class or two and sail your aft off. Make all those newbie mistakes that some of us are willing to admit. Loose some gelcoat, your lunch, and a little bit of pride. After a few years if you still love it, trade up for bigger prizes.

Don
 

·
Asleep at the wheel
Joined
·
3,016 Posts
Paul,
What you'll find here is that most people try to give a cold jolt of reality to those who come here asking if the $3,000 40'er they saw on Craigslist would make a good home. Or the people who say "I've had it and I'm just going to sail away". Most of us agree with the romantic view of sailing - it's why we got into sailing too - but as I'm sure you know from your Bayliner, boat ownership isn't always easy. And living aboard isn't for a lot of people. We see it over and over - people come here saying "hey, I just bought a 40' Hunter (no offense Smack!) as my first boat and my family and I are going to live aboard." They spend their life's savings on the boat, and then 6 months or a year later, they decide it's not for them, they have had enough, and want out. But the boat market sucks, so now you have a bunch of unhappy people who have exhausted their savings and are stuck living in less than 300 square feet for God-only-knows how long until they can sell their only asset which depreciates more and more with every passing day because they don't want to put the money into maintaining it. So, yeah, some of us can be a little cynical, skeptical, and outright negative at times.

In your case, it sounds like you've thought this through more than many who come here. Your experience with boating and living in an RV also helps a lot. At least you know what it's like to live in a small space for a long time.

Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Paul,
What you'll find here is that most people try to give a cold jolt of reality to those who come here asking if the $3,000 40'er they saw on Craigslist would make a good home. Or the people who say "I've had it and I'm just going to sail away". Most of us agree with the romantic view of sailing - it's why we got into sailing too - but as I'm sure you know from your Bayliner, boat ownership isn't always easy. And living aboard isn't for a lot of people. We see it over and over - people come here saying "hey, I just bought a 40' Hunter (no offense Smack!) as my first boat and my family and I are going to live aboard." They spend their life's savings on the boat, and then 6 months or a year later, they decide it's not for them, they have had enough, and want out. But the boat market sucks, so now you have a bunch of unhappy people who have exhausted their savings and are stuck living in less than 300 square feet for God-only-knows how long until they can sell their only asset which depreciates more and more with every passing day because they don't want to put the money into maintaining it. So, yeah, some of us can be a little cynical, skeptical, and outright negative at times.

In your case, it sounds like you've thought this through more than many who come here. Your experience with boating and living in an RV also helps a lot. At least you know what it's like to live in a small space for a long time.

Good luck!
Jimgo,
I appreciate any feedback. I also do not dismiss anyone's advice. I understand the misgivings some of you have, the doubt, the reluctance to believe, etc.
I feel like I'm fairly lucky. My job allows me to work as much, or as little as I like, and the work is everywhere. In that I find quite a bit of solace. If I am wrong, if I sink the boat, if it turns out I really did want the "American Dream" instead of some freedom and amazing stories, it will be very easy for me to return to a more normal life. But normal life....it even sounds horrible....
 

·
Senior Smart Aleck
Joined
·
2,150 Posts
So, for the third time, where will you be going?

No one is discouraging. Go for it, Dude! We all believe in the dream!

Now fill in the facts, so we can root for you, and live the dream vicariously through your exploits!

Oh, and we have pointed out two Tartan 34s for you - tell us what happens when you contact the owners. Take some photos, too...you know the old saying, it didn't happen if there are no photos!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Where will I go?

I will hang out where I find the boat then head for Florida as I begin to get proficient at sailing. Then I plan for the islands and the South American coast. Eventually Australia. Someday, with god willing, around the world. East coast plan, haven't come up with a west coast plan, but I'm sure it would be similar.
Of course, plans change, and I love to wing it....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
Go for it Paul. I'm relatively new here too (mostly a lurker), but we have a few things in common. Grew up around boats, but never owned a sailboat before. Found one last year that spoke to me (an old Balboa 8.2), moved aboard within a month and have been living aboard full-time and refitting her ever since. Great old boat, Lyle Hess knew what he was about with small sailing craft. No one ever has it all figured out, and the long-timers here are certainly on the money with cold doses of reality. But at the risk of sounding like the Pardeys, if you're self sufficient and determined you can go anywhere. Good luck with your hunt!


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So there is one I really like on yachtworld. 78 tartan 34, peconic bay Ny. I tried posting a link, didn't take.
Any thoughts or opinions?
There is also one I found for 6500. It's a fixer upper. Not sure that's the way to go though. I think it was on sailboatlistings.com.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Um...pick up the phone and call the seller/broker, or send an e-mail...then post the response here.:)

You do plan to contact the seller, right?

Or, do you just want to talk about buying a boat, for the fun of it?
Oh, I like you.....

The fixer upper:

"hey paul

thats really all the pictures i have- if you want to see something specific, let me know and i will take some more next time i go down. it was painted 3 years ago which is the last time it was out, so no i don't have any pics on the hard
thx"

And...

"the thing is, the boat is ready to sail right now- you dont' need to do anything.

that being said- there are things you could do to make it more pleasant.
cushions, curtains, new headliner if you want, i would def paint the cockpit, the old paint is starting to peel.
the bathroom sink could use a new surface (i may do this this week). i would re-caulk the entire toe rail.
the soft spots on the deck, you don't need to do anything about that now, but you should eventually. next year or so
thats about it.

ill give you any info you want to know about the boat, i hope i can sell the boat before july rolls around- interest has picked up since it finally started getting warmer around here"
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17 Posts
If what the owner says is backed by a survey and all the basics are sound (hull, etc), the fixer upper sounds like a solid functional project boat. Mine fell into the same category and I haven't been sorry, but I also thoroughly enjoy refitting old machines/vessels.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
If what the owner says is backed by a survey and all the basics are sound (hull, etc), the fixer upper sounds like a solid functional project boat. Mine fell into the same category and I haven't been sorry, but I also thoroughly enjoy refitting old machines/vessels.

Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Some work doesn't bother me at all. How much would I pay for a survey?

There is a thread on here about people willing to look at a boat for you and let you know if they think it's even worth getting a survey. Can't PM people yet though....
 
1 - 20 of 51 Posts
Top