SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 21 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
SO I dropped my snatch block overboard and my fingers shook looking at the cost of a replacement.

But then on eBay, I notice a bunch of ATV snatch blocks made from 316 stainless.

Warn Winch 61560 Snatch Block and Shackle | eBay

Why don't people use those?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Made for cable, Heavy, Ugly and if you keep watching Ebay you can get a deal on the right ones!.....Dale
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,784 Posts
The link you posted looks like the block is for wire, not line. You are supposed to run your Land Rover's winch wire through it and then attach it to your ATV with the shackle provided so you can extricate yourself from the river you landed in by mistake after your third beer. It "doubles" the pulling power, and since this makes it take twice as long, you get to finish your fourth beer. It is strong enough to be used on a boat, but the sheave probably isn't wide enough to take a line that won't cut into your hands when you go to trim it. (Your hands are not built to handle winch cable.) The way this ATV snatch block is built, with pieces that come together under pressure, means that when it's not under pressure (when it's on the windward side of a jibsheet, for example) it will clatter to the deck, making a lot of noise between the shackle, the cheeks, and the sheave, banging and jangling there on every wave until you tack, when the one on the other side begins doing the same. There is a reason boat snatch blocks often have rubber coatings on the outside- so the off-watch can sleep. Having to attach it with a shackle, rather than a clasp, means you will have to mouse the shackle if you don't want to lose the pin. This makes moving or changing the snatchblock quite a hassle. Boat-type snatchblocks are expensive, but there are reasons for it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,346 Posts
Sorry to hear about the loss of the snatch block my friend, try to think of it as a gift to the sailing gods . Here is what I do , I buy ones that are broken and then put a little wood on them .
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,959 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
Another advocate for Garhauer. A lot of bang for your buck, and made in the USA too.

That being said, have you considered Antal's Low Friction Rings? They're starting to replace blocks in many situations. I've replaced a few myself. Stupid simple, inexpensive, and work great.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Garhauer is a great company to do business with. Good products, reasonable prices and great service.

Sent from my LG-P769 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
Just saw a couple singles and pairs on E-Bay this morning at pretty good prices. Ya might consider looking/bidding.Ya never know!?
I won a pair of 52mmNMs last month for $70.00. Patience and constant searches..as well as being thrifty...helps ;)

Good Luck:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
Why do you need snatch blocks for sheet lines I prefer regular blocks, so the lines stay put better! And they cost less!.....Dale
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
286 Posts
Why do you need snatch blocks for sheet lines I prefer regular blocks...
I would guess for spin sheets.

If you've ever had to thread 2+ boat lengths (general rule of thumb) of spin sheet through a 'regular' block, you quickly learn to appreciate the invention of the snatch block.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,105 Posts
My spin blocks are at the very back of the boat and fixed. The most you would have to pull through is 10-15 feet of line……….Dale
 

·
Sailor
Joined
·
929 Posts
I use snatch blocks for my Yankee sheets. That makes it easy to adjust the sail fore and aft under load. Others have blocks on a track, I have snatch blocks on a metal toe rail.

Tod
 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
I think that is about the most expensive rescue pulley available (and it's still half the price of a Garhauer snatch block). For lighter loads you can get them down into the $15 price range.

An Antal ring with a soft shackle also looks like a good option and is under $20 (assuming you make your own soft shackles). However it will either not allow you to clip it in mid-line, or if you do clip it in mid-line (using the outside of the Antal ring) it won't be stable should the line go slack.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,264 Posts
There are a few issues with the Petzi.

1) other than using carabiners there is no good way to attach it. The spinning plate needs a positive attachment to the other side to keep it from opening.

2) it has a relatively low working load of 1700lbs.

3) I have no idea what it is made of, or what bearing material it uses. They may or may not be sutable for the marine environment.
 

·
no longer reading SailNet
Joined
·
2,309 Posts
1700lbs is a fine working load for a lot of the applications mentioned here, such as jib lead lines.

This one is $15, rated even lower (4kn is 900lbs), and aluminum with a nylon sheave. It is cheap enough to experiment with:
Amazon.com: Petzl Oscillante Pulley One Size: Sports & [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51nGF8%[email protected]@[email protected]@51nGF8%2BbVHL

The unknown material risk is what the spindle for the sheave is made of.

You could tether a snap shackle to one half of the body, then run the snap shackle through both sides of the body and something like a toe rail. Or use a U-shackle or caribineer.

I plan on playing with these or the Antal rings for my twing lines.
 
1 - 20 of 21 Posts
Top