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Sailnet seems to be the place to go for expert advive on circum-navigation.

So here is my question. What route should be taken to leave from Hawaii on a non-stop circumnavigation and to be able to hit two antipodial points on the globe? The antipodial for Hawaii is Botswana Africa, difficult to sail to. So I am thinking on the return hit the antipodial of the ocean just south of cape town, which is a point north of Hawaii between Hawaii and Alaska.

Use this link to find antipodial of any place on earth-

Antipode Map (AKA Tunnel Map)

Does this route make sense?
 

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Not sure why you would want to do it, but that is your business. It would make no sense to go there and come back because you would be going to windward for thousands of miles either going or coming. The only route that would make sense would be to go Hawaii to Cape Horn, keep going west around Cape of Good Hope and then west through the Indian Ocean south of Australia and New Zealand and then a good distance into the Pacific still around 40°S and then turn north to Hawaii. The 'only' other thing to figure out is when it would make sense to leave Hawaii to avoid tropical storms along the way. It would be a hellish undertaking to my way of thinking.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Not sure why you would want to do it, but that is your business. It would make no sense to go there and come back because you would be going to windward for thousands of miles either going or coming. The only route that would make sense would be to go Hawaii to Cape Horn, keep going west around Cape of Good Hope and then west through the Indian Ocean south of Australia and New Zealand and then a good distance into the Pacific still around 40°S and then turn north to Hawaii. The 'only' other thing to figure out is when it would make sense to leave Hawaii to avoid tropical storms along the way. It would be a hellish undertaking to my way of thinking.
The thing I am trying to do is hit the two antipodial points of the earth. Like you mention, the plan would be leave hawaii direct to Cape Horn, then to South Africa, then south of Australia and NZ, then turn north to the antipodial point north of Hawaii. Normally there is a high pressure area sitting north of hawaii so I am thinking ride the wind of this high pressure in a clockwise direction, and depending on position of the high, hitting a antipodial that would be in this area, then return to hawaii riding the trade winds in, as I would have sailed somewhat east of hawaii.
 

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I don't remember where I heard it, but someone once said, "Go west, young man, just go west."
That really is about as complicated as it gets, especially at about 6 miles and hour.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
I don't remember where I heard it, but someone once said, "Go west, young man, just go west."
That really is about as complicated as it gets, especially at about 6 miles and hour.
West is the "hard" way, I'm going the "easy" way.
 

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Sailnet seems to be the place to go for expert advive on circum-navigation.

So here is my question. What route should be taken to leave from Hawaii on a non-stop circumnavigation and to be able to hit two antipodial points on the globe? The antipodial for Hawaii is Botswana Africa, difficult to sail to. So I am thinking on the return hit the antipodial of the ocean just south of cape town, which is a point north of Hawaii between Hawaii and Alaska.

Use this link to find antipodial of any place on earth-

Antipode Map (AKA Tunnel Map)

Does this route make sense?
Why the need to hit two antipodal points?

Simply to establish some sort of newfangled 'Record' ?

casey1999 said:
West is the "hard" way, I'm going the "easy" way.
Yeah, that's the thing with those non-stoppers... The "easy way" amounts to basically being a circumnavigation of Antarctica...:)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Why the need to hit two antipodal points?

Simply to establish some sort of newfangled 'Record' ?



Yeah, that's the thing with those non-stoppers... The "easy way" amounts to basically being a circumnavigation of Antarctica...:)
Two antipodals is a true circumnavigation by vessel:
Wikipedia:


"Global circumnavigation[edit]In principle, if a person walks completely around either Pole, they will have crossed all meridians, but this is not generally considered a "circumnavigation." A basic definition of a global circumnavigation would be a route which covers at least a great circle, and in particular one which passes through at least one pair of points antipodal to each other.[1] In practice, different definitions of world circumnavigation are used, in order to accommodate practical constraints depending on the method of travel. Since the planet is quasispheroidal, a trip from one Pole to the other, and back again on the other side, would technically be a circumnavigation, but practical difficulties generally preclude such a voyage."
 

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most just cross their path and call it good, jajaja
 

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Circum-Navigation must cross the equator.
 

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Discussion Starter #12

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if you trade sailing you go west(equatorial route)

all other ways are harder...jaja just leave it at that
 

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if you trade sailing you go west if you are doing the capes(non stop) you go east
I think the trades ships actually went both direction depending on if they were "coming" or "going".

Cannot remember the sqaure rigger name but it was trying to get past Cape Horn going west. It tried for somthing like a month, it would make headway only to get blown back. The ship's passage was to Australia from England. Finally gave up and went East past Cape of Good Hope and on to Australia.
 

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not trade ships, TRADEWINDS SAILING

going east in the southern around the capes is considered the standard non stop way,

however those setting off from europe from the east are going INTO the wind when rounding capehorn
 

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I think the trades ships actually went both direction depending on if they were "coming" or "going".

Cannot remember the sqaure rigger name but it was trying to get past Cape Horn going west. It tried for somthing like a month, it would make headway only to get blown back. The ship's passage was to Australia from England. Finally gave up and went East past Cape of Good Hope and on to Australia.
read below:)
 

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if you trade sailing you go west(equatorial route)

all other ways are harder...jaja just leave it at that
There's really no way to do a tradewind non-stop circumnavigation, unless you can convince the Panama Canal Authority to put you through "non-stop"... :)

No one technically sails around the world solo via the canals, either, as it is not possible to pass thru either without assistance...
 

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There's really no way to do a tradewind non-stop circumnavigation, unless you can convince the Panama Canal Authority to put you through "non-stop"... :)

No one technically sails around the world solo via the canals, either, as it is not possible to pass thru either without assistance...
canal solo sailing? whats that? where did I say that? jajaja

what I meant was that and I agree with is trade sailing the equatorial route is waht most circumnavigators do, yes its not non stop...no one really does it

it is however the easiest sailing wise and why its chosen

yes I agree

however those going non stop from say california the first cape is the hardest cape horn...going east

remeber the panama canal among other things was to help save time and lives because going around cape horn to starboard was what killed of and sunl so many trade ships

thought we all knew that jejeje

peace
 

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Jessica Watson sailed around the world, non stop going west. But she did sail north to cross the equator, sailed back south and then continued west. She did not go through the Canal.

Amazing spirit and determination. :)
 

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yeoup for any record you have to go north of the equator for at least 24 hourse they say

in any case like others have mentioned if you just go around the capes and dont go past the equator its not a circumnavigation but simply a trip around antartica

still hard as hell though! obviously
 
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