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Some of the boats I am looking at have not been hauled out for winter. While I assume it is preferable to have a boat hauled out and covered for the winter in northern latitudes, how big a deal is it?
 

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We are mid-bay on the Chesapeake and leave our boat in for the winter. We do our haul-out in mid-summer, for 2-4 weeks typically.

Depending on where you haul for the winter, you are at the mercy of other boats and schedules for getting re-launched, especially if you are stacked behind a few rows of boats. By staying in, you can get the late autumn and early spring sailing.

Ice has not been an issue. We have a full boat cover, so snow isn't either. The mid/late-summer haul-out dries the boat nicely and gets us back in the water with a fresh clean bottom for the best part of the sailing season -- autumn.
 

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AEOLUS II
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Last year we were hauled North of Baltimore,

Up there the extreme tides and winter winds seemed even more harsh than S of Annapolis.

Plenty of folks kept the boat in but regretted it.

The super-low tides pulled out stantions and cleats.

The wind pounded them against the docks.

That's too much for me to worry about!!
 

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not Sully or Dandelion
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Depending on where you haul for the winter, you are at the mercy of other boats and schedules for getting re-launched, especially if you are stacked behind a few rows of boats. By staying in, you can get the late autumn and early spring sailing.
This is the reason I did not haul this past winter.

I sail on Long Island Sound.
 

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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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Just as an observation from someone that lives in a condo complex with its own marina and right across the water way from one of the biggest marina's in Annapolis MD.

If I had to make a rough guesstimate, I'd say that only about 25% of the boats around me haul out for the winter. The one caveat being that these boats are in a protected waterway, not directly exposed to the bay.

Most run a tarp over the main and over the bow to keep any infrequent snows we have from filling the cockpit. Probably less than 10% get their boats shrink wrapped. And all the slips around here whether privately owned or marina owned have bubblers to combat ice formation.

It's probably a bigger risk for absentee owners that for whatever reason leave their boats in Annapolis but live in Florida, NY or wherever and don't have the ability to occasionally drive or walk down to their slips to adjust lines when abnormal tides are predicted.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks all! Based on the foregoing it would seem that while the preferred method (from a boat condition not an accessability standpoint) is to haul out, it is far more common and not overly detrimental to leave your boat in the water for the winter. I was mostly concerned about damage that might occur over the winter due to freeze/thaw issues as well as giving the bottom a chance to dry out over the winter.
 

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... as well as giving the bottom a chance to dry out over the winter.
There is some debate about whether fiberglass laminate can be dried, but if it can, not much drying will take place in cold winter months. A month in the hot summer is probably equal to several winters of "drying".
 

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There is some debate about whether fiberglass laminate can be dried, but if it can, not much drying will take place in cold winter months. A month in the hot summer is probably equal to several winters of "drying".
I've been storing in the water for a few years now and I'd take it one step further to say that from what I have seen over the years that if your hull has the pre-disposition for blisters you will get them whether you haul or not. Whether it's an early 80's hull or some "bad run" year from a specific manufacturer I don't think it makes much difference if you try to "dry them out" for a few months a year to fix a "built-in" problem.
 

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With no personal certainty or opinion I have heard it opined that it is actually easier on the hull to leave the boat in the water rather than rest it on it's keel ashore.

Personally, I haul in November and re-launch in April. Since I live 3-hours from my boat it is peace of mind that she is not unattended in the water.

Either way, if cared for, I think the boat will be fine.

MGM
 

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Annapolis doesn't qualify as "north", it is very much mid-atlantic states.

However, boats that aren't going to be used rarely sink on land, and if you're a girly-man who can't stand sailing in under 75F weather, it makes sense to haul the boat out since you're not going to be using it from October through May. :)

Not so long ago, it was routine to have ice on the water in the winter--in the Northeast, anyhow--and ice outright sinks boats. So hauling for the winter was a great idea. These days? Right, when it can be 65F in the dead of winter?! Ice doesn't seem like so much to worry about, as opposed to beautiful days when you can sail without a crowd.

Unless you're on a mooring depending on seasonal launch service--which just won't be there in the winter, either.

Riggers also say that ice forming in the standing riggin, in the swages, is a cause of rigging failure and recommend taking down the mast and rigging if you are in an area where there is winter ice. That's much easier when the boat is stored on land--but something a lot of folks don't do in the winter, to save money.

Decisions, decisions.
 

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1979 C&C 30 Mk I - 2QM15
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Annapolis doesn't qualify as "north", it is very much mid-atlantic states.
Annapolis isn't at the arctic circle, but a week ago we got 8" of snow and any boat in a protected waterway without a bubbler system had about a 1/4 inch of ice on the water around its hull, which means we're not exactly Key West either.

Besides... I'm pretty sure the original Subject line to this thread was:

Not Hauling Out For Winter In "Maryland"
 

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well if i hauled then i could not have sailed to annapolis over the weekend, sailed down saturday, ate at buddies, sleep on the boat sailed home sunday. now the weather at annapolis and the inner harbour was over 70 but the temp on the bay was about 55 with 15 knot winds, great sailing with a coat on
 

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We haul every other year and am located on Rock Creek off of the end of thePatapsco in a well protected slip. We do have a bubbler system and use it when the cold weather is at it worts usually for about 1 month.

We put two coats of bottom paint on blue trinidad over red trinidad so we can see how much bottom pain we have left on and how its wearing. (Usually lasts 2+ years. Hauling also lets you work on the hull gelcoat as well as in February and March beofre you really can sail much. I dont fancy giving up to to four weeks of sailing season. we were the last boat hauled at Oak Harbor (Dec 15) and will be one off the first to be splashed (two weeks or so)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
We've had a boat in the Annapolis area for over thirty years. All boats have been fibreglass. Our slips have always been in a protected area. Some years we've used a bubbler and others we haven't. Many years ago the bay froze solid. We check it atleast once a month and heavy up the mooring lines for the winter. We have never had a problem. We all keep an eye on each others boats and will call if we suspect a problem on someone elses boat.
 

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I keep my boat in year round off of the north side of the Patapsco, and don't use a bubbler system. Never have had a problem. There are a number of other boats nearby that stay in over the winter, and I haven't heard of them having problems, either.
 
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