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Bristol 29.9
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Mr. cthoops and I were hoping to upgrade our anchor this season so that we could actually - wait for it - anchor overnight. Right now we have a lightweight danforth anchor that is more of a lunch hook.

We wanted to get one of the new gen anchors but we aren't sure how we would store it. Our bow pulpit (which our current anchor hangs off) is only one rail, and it's curved, so it doesn't appear that a universal bracket-type system will work.

What do people do in this type of situation?

Thanks.
 

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Master Mariner
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A picture would be helpful.
 

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I would install a bow roller assembly for the anchor. That way you don't ever have to lift the anchor. You just pull all the chain or rode in until the anchor snubs up on the roller then lock it in place. If you want to see pictures just google bow roller anchor.
 

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Closet Powerboater
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If its a next-generation anchor that you're after that you're having trouble storing it you might consider the Mantus which can be disassembled for storage. Since this is a steel anchor it could be heavy and awkward too disassemble and stow with each use. Another option if you consider it a next-generation anchor is the aluminum spade anchor which also disassembles with only one bolt. My last suggestion would be a fortress anchor. As you know the fortress is not a next-generation anchor and is patterned after the Danforth style but the Danforth anchors stow flat nicely on deck it is also lightweight and disassembles.

I think any of these choices would serve you well and remember to always err on the side of more scope rather than less. Happy overnight anchoring and deep sleeping! Once you get comfortable with overnight anchoring all kinds of new boating options open up for you!
 

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If you are anchoring a Bristol 24 (as per your profile), a medium sized Danforth should work well enough overnight, especially in the sandy stretches of the East Coast that you are likely to frequent. How much does your inadequate lunch hook weigh? Danforth recommends their 16-pound standard anchor for a boat up to 31'. We have their 25 pounder for our 36' sloop (along with a second one as a spare that we've never needed to use) and have anchored in lots of places since we got the boat in 1999.
'
 

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Although they don't get a lot of love around here, Danforth type anchors actually work pretty well on Long Island Sound. Most of the bottoms are mud, and that's what they are best for. Yes they don't reset well in sudden wind shifts and can get fouled in those conditions, but otherwise they are a pretty good option.
 

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Bristol 29.9
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've been off-line for the past 24 hours (yes, I started going through SailNet withdrawal), so here is the picture that Capta requested.

I'm not sure how much our Danforth weighs. Mr. Cthoops seems to think it's 16 pounds, but I would have thought it would be more difficult for me to lift at that weight. Then again, perhaps I have more upper body strength than I realized. We'll have to check it out when we're at the boat next weekend. Our boat is only 24 feet but it's 6,000 pounds.

It's good to hear that the Danforth might actually be a decent option, but after reading so many horrors stories about them, I'm not sure how well I'd sleep at night.


 

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If you go for a bigger Danforth, make sure it fits in your holder. You don't want the stock and chain dangling or interfering with your jib furler, or you'd have to make a new arrangement for stowing it. We've slept happily on our Danforth in places from Ellis Island NY to Burnt Island ME, and our boat weighs about 10 tons.
 

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Simpliest thing would be to get a Fortress. They disassemble and are lightweight, since they are made of aluminum. These 2 features allow you to store it somewhere else when you are not overnighting.

Good luck. Overnighting is half the fun and opens up new cruisung grounds, as it allows you to make longer trips.

Regards,
Brad
 

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Cthoops I think if you went up a size or 2 with a Danforth you would be very happy and it won't cost as much as most of the other anchors. I have a Danforth on my E-32 that's meant for a boat in the 45' range with chain, and have anchored off the coast overnights with no worries. I also use the mounts of the rail as you have for my main anchor with no problem because of the size.
 

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Broad Reachin'
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We had a similar set-up to the OP's on one of our previous boats. I kept the Danforth on the bow rail mount as a lunch hook and stowed a 33lbs Lewmar claw in the cockpit lazarette. The chain and rode were in the below-deck chain locker at the bow, with the only access from the deck being a chain pipe.

We used the Danforth for picnics, swimming etc., but I lugged the heavy claw up to the bow whenever we anchored for the night. That boat didn't have a bow/anchor roller and no easy way to install one because of the stem-head fitting and toe rails. It worked the way we used it, but it wasn't ideal and I cursed that big anchor every time I had to and from the cockpit.

Excellent anchor storage and a proper roller were mandatory requirements for the next boat.
 
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