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Good eyes no they don't. I intend to go over that decision on my install video. But basically I couldn't figure out how to do in in sections like I did if it were staggered. I would have had to do the floor in one session. But where you cant kneel on it when it is wet their was no room to do it that way. Spreading the glue was the problem as I would have had to bring some of it back up after I did a section or not put the glue down in a square patch.

I also justified in my mind lining the ends up as that is how they do it with real teak on al lot of smaller boats like mine.
Having a hard time understanding your reasoning on this, can you elaborate a bit more? The product looks decent but the seams may be an issue for you moving forward. It looks like you just needed to cut short a few of the 'teak' and 'holy' strips length wise to stagger the pattern. It would have resulted in a more random seam line and limited flex of the material due to such a large seam length. You can apply the glue/mastic on the back of the boards if you needed to stop the project at any point. This is common for tile setters in tight spaces. Wondering if I'm not understanding your restrictions on the project.

Either way nice job and I'm sure it looks better than before.
 

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I should have asked before but what issues do you force with the seams. It is to late for me but might be useful information for anyone ells who starts the same project and finds this thread.
Quite possibly nothing at all, but over time you may see flexing at the seams. Wood floors are normally laid with staggered seams/joints for both aesthetic and structural reasons. Putting aesthetics aside, forces applied in proximity to a seam tend to flex or bend at that seam. Repeated over time, the joint will open more and more, often across the entire length of the seam. The impact would be compounded on some salon floors as they have a curved surface and a relatively small area of active foot traffic (more stress cycles/time). The thickness of the flooring material and the substrate it's applied to are also factors.

When the pieces are staggered, a weave is created in that plane. Adjacent boards won't share as long of a perpendicular seam so when a force is applied, it's distributed across the larger solid surface area of the material and a much shorter joint. The force is absorbed by the surrounding boards as opposed to the space in the seam.
 
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