SailNet Community banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,561 Posts
Can you copy/paste the article. I cant get access to it.

I saw them often when I was in NYC and thought they had a great business but fragile in they were controlled by whoever owns their waterfront land, moorings etc.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,327 Posts
Mark...text of the article below.



Dipping into the murky waters of the Hudson River was part of the fun when Diana Tandia’s 10-year-old son, Mohamed, learned to sail on a small boat within sight of Lower Manhattan.

“It’s a bonding thing, getting dirty in the water, eating lunch together,” Ms. Tandia said this week, as she recalled her son’s sailing camp at North Cove Marina, in Battery Park City.

For 20 years, a Battery Park resident, Michael Fortenbaugh, has been a presence at the marina, running an adult sailing school and yacht club with shared boats, and more recently the junior sailing camp that Ms. Tandia’s son attended, a rarity in New York City. Supporters call it a populist outpost, populist for Manhattan anyway, where children can learn to sail for about $400 a week during the summer.

But Mr. Fortenbaugh’s days at the marina may be over. His contract to run the marina expires Dec. 31, and he has been told by the Battery Park City Authority, the agency that controls the land the neighborhood sits on, that he can continue to keep his boats there for 60 more days, but must relinquish control of the marina, which he interprets as a sign that his contract will not be renewed.

Photo

The headquarters of the Manhattan Yacht Club, which owns the small boats that Mr. Fortenbaugh uses in his instruction programs. Credit Michael Appleton for The New York Times
Mr. Fortenbaugh and his supporters have been trying to rally public sentiment by casting his fight as a David versus Goliath battle between a small-business man and community resident against influential real estate and yachting interests.

One of those bidding against Mr. Fortenbaugh for the license to run the marina for the next 10 years is Brookfield Property Partners, which owns the glossy five-building complex around the marina and is in the process of installing new restaurants and high-end stores like Michael Kors and Hermès. Under Brookfield’s proposal, the marina would be operated by Island Global Yachting, which runs luxury-yacht marinas in places like St. Thomas, V.I.; Turks and Caicos; Montauk, N.Y.; and Newport, R.I.

A vote on the contract was scheduled this month, but postponed until January because of a lack of a quorum.

The marina was built about a quarter-century ago but fell into distress after the Sept. 11 attacks, when Lower Manhattan was a disaster area. Mr. Fortenbaugh took it over, and helped make the marina a destination for big yachts that also anchor in fashionable places like Newport and Nantucket, a luxury counterpoint to the school he continued to run.

“He has the megayacht crowd coexisting with the guy-next-door crowd,” said James Cavanaugh, who was president of the authority when Mr. Fortenbaugh received the contract; both are on the board of the New York Harbor Sailing Foundation, the nonprofit that sponsors the sailing camp. “The thought that he’s now going to be shown the door, it just doesn’t seem right.”

Mr. Fortenbaugh said that while he was in an enviable location, his business was still a small one. Last year, he said, he took in $1.3 million in revenue and paid $300,000 to the authority, a fixed rent agreed upon years ago. He said he had proposed, for the next contract, to bring in new revenue through events like a sailboat show, and to raise his rent to about $400,000. (His adult sailing operations are for profit, and junior programs are nonprofit.)

Continue reading the main storyContinue reading the main storyContinue reading the main story
Mr. Fortenbaugh has drummed up support among his sailing school and yachting club members, who rallied at Battery Park City on his behalf on Monday.

It is not clear whether anyone besides Brookfield and Mr. Fortenbaugh’s group has submitted an offer, since the bids have not been made public.

The authority’s request for proposals recognizes the appeal of Mr. Fortenbaugh’s sailing school by requiring the winning bidder to provide a “reasonably” priced sailing school of comparable size, though it does not define reasonable. A promise of community-based programming, including opportunities for children and teenagers “at every income level,” is worth 15 percent of the score to win the contract.

The authority also suggested some improvements that an operator more deep-pocketed than Mr. Fortenbaugh might have an easier time carrying out, like a wave-attenuation system that would protect boats from rocking.

“The North Cove Marina is a public asset and the Battery Park City Authority operates it for the benefit of the community and all New Yorkers,” the authority said in a statement. “A competitive bid process was required to select the marina’s licensee through 2025, and included commitments to ensure enhanced public access to the waterfront and the continuation and improvement of existing marina programs, including a sailing school.”

Mr. Fortenbaugh says he believes that Brookfield and its partner, Island Global, are better positioned to win the contract because of their financial and political clout. Both Brookfield and Island Global’s chairman, Andrew Farkas, have been generous donors to Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, who appointed four of the five Battery Park City Authority members, and Mr. Cuomo once worked for Island Capital Group, also run by Mr. Farkas.

The governor’s office said on Monday that it had been told that the authority was going to seek new bids for the marina, as is standard when a license expires. The office said it was not aware of any details of the bidding until The New York Times asked about it.

“The authority ran a comprehensive procurement process based solely on the merit of the applications and with zero input from the governor’s office,” it said in a statement.

A spokesman for Island Global declined to comment. A spokeswoman for Brookfield, Melissa Coley, confirmed that the real estate company was bidding for the marina, but would not provide further details about the bid.

The authority’s request notes that Lower Manhattan is a fairly affluent area, serving 310,000 office workers with an average annual salary of $117,000 and 61,000 residents with average household income of $204,000. But Mr. Fortenbaugh said that in the end, the marina had its limitations. “We know that it’s a parking lot for boats,” Mr. Fortenbaugh said. “It’s a seasonal business. Somebody could come in and offer these pie-in-the-sky things that don’t reflect reality.”
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,561 Posts
Ahhhhh, the one in the North Cove Marina. Lol yep, they have no chance. That would be the highest value per square foot marina in the world. And rightly so given its location.

Its nice to have kids learning to sail for only $400 per week... But...

Its definitly in the IGY area of expertise. Its $7 per foot per night now. So a 100 foot boat pays $700 per night which is the same as the smallest room in the hotel 100 meters away.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,488 Posts
If it was the only place kids could learn to sail in NYC, I would say the David v Goliath thing would work. I don't believe it is, by a long shot.

Why did I think that Dennis Connor owned/ran the marina in North Cove? That is, btw, a bucket list destination one day. Just pull in, hit our favs in NYC for a night. The problem is, when we're on the boat, being in the city has little attraction at all.
 

·
BJV
Joined
·
242 Posts
Unless on a very large boat, very uncomfortable place to dock, major wave action. Cheaper and more comfortable to stay x river at Libery Landing and take water taxi over.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,327 Posts
The headline seems a little mis-leading.

As I understand it Mike Fortenbaugh holds the lease to run the entire marina in which he also houses and runs the Manhattan sailing school and club The article states that the operation of the marina is out to bid ( though, it's really an RFP, request for proposal). It seems like, were he to lose the lease to the marina, he'd still have the opportunity to run the sailing school, under the new contract since a sailing school is part of the request. I don't think he'd have any competition for that. The other schools in the area seem to be happy in their NJ locations.

I wonder if the rent of $300,000/yr. is for the sailing school/club or for the entire marina operation. These articles always seem to raise more questions than they answer.

The real question would seem to be: is he willing or able to operate the sailing school if he loses the contract for the marina operation? I suppose that would depend on what rates a new operator would impose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,111 Posts
Gee, what a shocker:

Mr. Fortenbaugh says he believes that Brookfield and its partner, Island Global, are better positioned to win the contract because of their financial and political clout. Both Brookfield and Island Global’s chairman, Andrew Farkas, have been generous donors to Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo, who appointed four of the five Battery Park City Authority members, and Mr. Cuomo once worked for Island Capital Group, also run by Mr. Farkas.
Yup, that's The American Way, alright...

Personally, I've always detested that place, probably the most uncomfortable wave action I've ever experienced in a marina... They've always been the ultimate rip-off artists, 15 years ago I was charged $40 to simply discharge a passenger, pulling alongside only long enough for them to jump off without even tying up...
 

·
Administrator
Joined
·
7,561 Posts
There other sailing schools. The boats are moored by pier 40.
And at $400 per week per child they are teaching the next mob of Trumps.

BTW Liberty Landing ain't New York. But 79th Street is :)
 

·
Schooner Captain
Joined
·
2,199 Posts
BTW Liberty Landing ain't New York. But 79th Street is :)
I hate the 79th street boat basin. Ratsy, nasty, rundown, overpriced.
The staff are all a-holes and most of the mooring cleats are barely screwed in.
I have been there 5 times. :puke
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,327 Posts
BTW Liberty Landing ain't New York. But 79th Street is :)
I've always said that the best view of NYC is from NJ, and it can be had for a discount. ( relatively speaking)

;-) It's only a short 10 minute ferry ride or a path train across, if one wants to site see in NYC.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,488 Posts
I hate the 79th street boat basin. Ratsy, nasty, rundown, overpriced.
The staff are all a-holes and most of the mooring cleats are barely screwed in.
I have been there 5 times. :puke
I still think it's an experience everyone should have once. To dinghy in to Manhattan is surreal. Nevertheless, this is all true. Sort of how you learn to harden up survive in NYC (my old home town) :)
 
  • Like
Reactions: mbianka

·
Schooner Captain
Joined
·
2,199 Posts
I still think it's an experience everyone should have once. To dinghy in to Manhattan is surreal. Nevertheless, this is all true. Sort of how you learn to harden up survive in NYC (my old home town) :)
If we do it again we will most likely dinghy up to the north a bit, land on the rocks, and chain up the boat, rather then spend $25 to get off at a dock. We did however go into NYC by taxi.
This one stop alone is enough to show you should have a very good dinghy, that can take abuse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,549 Posts
I still think it's an experience everyone should have once. To dinghy in to Manhattan is surreal. Nevertheless, this is all true. Sort of how you learn to harden up survive in NYC (my old home town) :)
Lived on board at Chelsea Piers on Manhattan's west side for a couple of years. It was such a different experience out on the docks compared to the hustle and bustle on the streets. Expensive dockage but, convenient since I was working in midtown Manhattan at the time. One day instead of dragging my laundry several blocks inland to a laundromat. I threw it all in the dingy and headed across the Hudson River to the Port Imperial Marina (now defunct) which had an on site laundry. I used my Eldridge Tide and Pilot to choose the best time to ride the current up to the marina and then be able to ride the current back down. Had to chill at the bar for a bit, but, was a fun couple of hours on the water. Why? Because I could.:D
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top