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Discussion Starter #1
Is there any reason not to use oak board for backing plates for deck hardware? I know aluminum, stainless steel, fiberglass, and marine plywood are typically used, but why not oak? I would of course seal it with epoxy first.
 

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Because

Generally because it can split along the grain easily where ply can't. Decks, depending upon the boat and core condition, can flex, especially under stanchions, oak will split before flexing..
 

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It is also more likely to warp if it gets wet and dries than plywood.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Would thoroughly saturating the oak with epoxy and/or encasing it in fiberglass solve these issues? (splitting, cracking, warping?) I am having a hard time finding marine plywood.
 

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Would thoroughly saturating the oak with epoxy and/or encasing it in fiberglass solve these issues? (splitting, cracking, warping?) I am having a hard time finding marine plywood.
If you are having a hard time finding marine plywood - just purchase some 10oz fiberglass matt and make up a 1/4 inch backing plate that way. It would be more durable in the end.

Create a frame of whatever size is necessary. Wipe down the interior of your frame with melted candle wax (this is to prevent the epoxy from attaching to the frame esp since I assume you will use wood - but you could use heavy cardboard as well). You can use any kind of oil - linseed, vaseline, cooking oil ....btw

Cut the 10 oz cloth to fit inside the frame - as many pieces as necessary to build the depth.

Place frame on a piece of plastic (I use painters plastic for my projects)

Then lay first layer down inside frame - apply epoxy with a brush. Then add next layer and use brush to stiple it down to absorb excess epoxy, add as little epoxy as you can to make sure the layer is soaked ... repeat as necessary (number of layers).

Usually takes about 48 hours to cure full strength. Depending on temp >60 degrees.

Wallah you have backing plates that are almost indestructible (and will not rot if you have water intrusion) :)
 

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Why not lay up some fiberglass backing plates. :)

Jody's posted how to do it...
 

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Perhaps someone has some stainless cut offs you could have fun drilling.
 

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I think you would be better off going down to the local scrap yard and buying some appropriately thick pieces of flat aluminum plate. Aluminum cuts and drills easily.

Oak also has a tendency to rot pretty quickly.
 

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Then look for a smashed street sign...

Would thoroughly saturating the oak with epoxy and/or encasing it in fiberglass solve these issues? (splitting, cracking, warping?) I am having a hard time finding marine plywood.
With a port-a-band (or saber saw) drill press and grinder, aluminum works as fast as an easy as wood, with no epoxy needed.

I'm sure you can find scrap that does not require a felony;). Sheet metal shops often have scraps for a song.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ok..this leads me to a second question...what if I were to use an aluminum plate as a BASE plate for some hardware on the cabin top, which would be secured with stainless bolts...would this be a bad choice to due corrosion issues with aluminum/stainless/saltwater combo?
 

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Ok..this leads me to a second question...what if I were to use an aluminum plate as a BASE plate for some hardware on the cabin top, which would be secured with stainless bolts...would this be a bad choice to due corrosion issues with aluminum/stainless/saltwater combo?
It could - but you have to get the specific grade of Aluminum for the project. Secondly since you will be using stainless your holes will have to slightly larger and use butyl or 3M 4200 liberally as you can not let the two dissimilar metal interact.. Personally, I would stay away from from Aluminum as a backing plate as it will be cheaper and easier to fabricate the fiberglass or get the correct stainless steel metal for the job.

Your option for using oak - it seemed you were looking for a low cost way of handling the issue...
 

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What kind of hardware are you talking about? And what do you mean by a base plate. Most hardware doesn't need to be mounted on a plate.
 

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Unless it is anodized, you are going to get signifigant pitting.

The SS connection itself is not generally a big problem.

But over time, I doubt you will like the appearance. Aluminum is not too bad below decks, but on deck it is challenged.
 

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It could - but you have to get the specific grade of Aluminum for the project. Secondly since you will be using stainless your holes will have to slightly larger and use butyl or 3M 4200 liberally as you can not let the two dissimilar metal interact.. Personally, I would stay away from from Aluminum as a backing plate as it will be cheaper and easier to fabricate the fiberglass or get the correct stainless steel metal for the job.

Your option for using oak - it seemed you were looking for a low cost way of handling the issue...

I guess everybody has their preferences, but I would rather cut and drill a piece of 1/4" aluminum to make a backing plate than have to deal with resin and glass. :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #16
What kind of hardware are you talking about? And what do you mean by a base plate. Most hardware doesn't need to be mounted on a plate.
Need to run lines (halyard, reefs) back to the cockpit but he cabin top on my Columbia Mk26 is too rounded ("bubble" style cabin top) to mount the hardware directly to the cabin top surface!
 

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Need to run lines (halyard, reefs) back to the cockpit but he cabin top on my Columbia Mk26 is too rounded ("bubble" style cabin top) to mount the hardware directly to the cabin top surface!
So you need to attach the blocks to the area around the mast - why not go this route and save all the expense. Stainless steel washer use two - one that is definitely oversize that meets at the bulkhead, cabin top or whatever - a second one that meets the needs of the nut. You'll save a ton in expense and effort (as knot put it - why do it, but if was a like a winch I would go my previous route))....and you can get them in stainless at about .75 cents per.....

Go that route... unless you are installing a mast block plate....
 

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Discussion Starter #19
So you need to attach the blocks to the area around the mast - why not go this route and save all the expense. Stainless steel washer use two - one that is definitely oversize that meets at the bulkhead, cabin top or whatever - a second one that meets the needs of the nut. You'll save a ton in expense and effort (as knot put it - why do it, but if was a like a winch I would go my previous route))....and you can get them in stainless at about .75 cents per.....

Go that route... unless you are installing a mast block plate....
Its not the mast base blocks that are the issue, those are already installed at the mast base. Its the deck organizer (actually a double cheek block) that needs to be affixed to the cabin top. If I use teak for a base plate, how do I treat/maintain it?
 

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So you need to attach the blocks to the area around the mast - why not go this route and save all the expense. Stainless steel washer use two - one that is definitely oversize that meets at the bulkhead, cabin top or whatever - a second one that meets the needs of the nut. You'll save a ton in expense and effort (as knot put it - why do it, but if was a like a winch I would go my previous route))....and you can get them in stainless at about .75 cents per.....

Go that route... unless you are installing a mast block plate....
I'm thinking that he might need to mount an organizer or some clutches or something. In that instance he would be well advised to make a Base that matches the contour of the deck.
One good way to go about this is to stick a coarse adhesive backed sandpaper to the deck (or mast) and use that to form the piece.
Teak or Starboard would be suitable for an organizer.
 
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