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Discussion Starter #1
Hello, I hope you don't mind a newbie diving straight in and asking for help.

I know Beneteau v Jeanneau is the oldest of old chestnuts... Nevertheless, we have an opportunity to buy one of other of these boats through a charter company ownership deal. We are fully aware of the "cost" side of production boats operating on charter, but effectively deferring running costs for 5 years works for us financially and, above all, gives us the opportunity to advance our life(style) plans by at least 5-10 years.

The very long term dream is to spend 6 months of the year on a/the yacht and 6 months in the mountains. Short-term, a few weeks a year is all we can manage anyway, and medium-term, a month or 2 at a time is conceivable. We would want to be based in the Med, but with the ability to head to the Canaries/Madeira occasionally or even a once-in-a-blue-moon transat, so in terms of usage a production boat should do everything we want.

So, given the rambling above, I was wondering whether anyone has any experience of either of these two fairly new models (or indeed their predecessors)? We have the opportunity to view both this weekend so will be able to have a look at initial build quality for ourselves, realising they've not been around long enough yet to have a built up a history of durability or otherwise... Many thanks in advance for any thoughts!
 

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October Moon B43
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We bought a Beneteau 43 in the fall and love her. She's fast and comfortable. This is our 4th Beneteau so that should tell you something, we like their boats. We always like the lines of the Jenneau and looked at the 44 at the shows but just didn't care for the quality of the materials in the cabins. Thought the woodwork looked cheap and was mis-matched. Also thought the ergonomics of the cockpit were less than that of the B43. Haven't sailed the Jenneau so can't comment on that aspect of it. Good luck with your decision.
 

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I also did compare the 44i against OC43. If you look deep, you'll find several cons for both, but there are more pros for OC43. Don't look for 3rd part products (wiches, instruments, etc) as they're manufactured by someone else, but rather compare the lines, design, ergonomics, etc. At the end, the astonishing bright, clear, illumiated saloon is something that we felt in love on ours.
 

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We were considering a Jeanneau 39i when we learned of the new Beneteau line. Thank God we didn't go with the Jeanneau! We waited a bit longer and ended up with the Beneteau 43. We are currently about to go transatlantic with it. We've been cruising full time for the last 3 months and are very happy with our choice. Here's a few reasons we liked the Beneteau better:

- Design: both deck lines and modern interior
- Comfort details: like the companionway doors, stranding shower, indirect lighting, etc
- Price (Beneteaus are assembled in the US, cheaper than importing from Europe)
 

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Hey guys - not to throw a wrench in it - but what's up with the interior liners in Benes. I love the boats - but everyone I've looked at ('90s vintage) has sagging liners. Have you guys dealt with that? Is is a problemmatic/expensive fix?
 

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October Moon B43
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Beneteau got away from the liners some time ago, in the late 90s and beyond. Our 02 B361 had a fiberglass liner with wood strips to accent it. Our new B43 has a rigid liner with a vinyl type cover. I cant imagine it will ever delaminate.
Mike
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Sorry for the delayed reply but thanks for your help. We were able to see both boats in neighbouring marinas and we opted for the Jeanneau in the end. For us, we found the 44i more spacious (which is good if we eventually intend to spend more than a couple of weeks at a time on board), more airy, it had more handholds (with a view to being below decks at a heel) and the absolute killer was the Jeanneau had a proper chart table (I should mention that both options available were the 4 cabin/2 head version). The 4th cabin in the Beneteau also stole far too much space from the saloon in our view and the layout of the Jeanneau in teh 4-berth configuration was more versatile.
 

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charter ownership

Hey there. IN a former thread you mentioned "...We are fully aware of the "cost" side of production boats operating on charter, but effectively deferring running costs for 5 years works for us financially and, above all, gives us the opportunity to advance our life(style) plans by at least 5-10 years."

I am in the early stages of considering this route. Can you discribe/explain what you meant by "cost side of production boats operating on charter"?

How has the first season of chartering been going? Do you see the wear and tear more than you expected?

By the way, great choice in boat. I charter jeannes and really enjoy the (39i 44i and 49DS).

Thanks and regards,

Steve
stephencastellano at gmail dott caulm
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Hey there. IN a former thread you mentioned "...We are fully aware of the "cost" side of production boats operating on charter, but effectively deferring running costs for 5 years works for us financially and, above all, gives us the opportunity to advance our life(style) plans by at least 5-10 years."

I am in the early stages of considering this route. Can you discribe/explain what you meant by "cost side of production boats operating on charter"?
Well I guess there are 3 aspects:

1. It depends on the type of sailing you want to do. If you're going to spend all your time in the Southern Oceans, a production boat may not be the first boat you would choose. OTOH they are clearly cost-effective and relatively easy to maintain, or the charter companies wouldn't use them, and they are fine for the sunnier climes that I want to be sailing in these days ;) Do your research on your boat, know what you're getting and decide if it's the boat for you.

2. They will naturally get more wear and tear from 30 weeks a year use than a private boat would in say 3 weeks (barring accidents)

3. You do not have unlimited usage of your boat.

It's horses for courses. If you are going cruising around the world next year, then you wouldn't use a charter company scheme to buy your boat or want their standard spec. But for us, with limited time available in the next little while, the scheme has allowed us to buy a boat long before we thought we would be able to - it made it a reality instead of a dream - and gives us 5 years to plan the finances to allow us to spend more time on the boat and to up the spec when we take her over. For some people, the limited access and the wear would be deal-breakers - for us they are a price well worth paying taking the long view.

As with anything, do your homework and know what you're getting into.

How has the first season of chartering been going? Do you see the wear and tear more than you expected?

By the way, great choice in boat. I charter jeannes and really enjoy the (39i 44i and 49DS).
We've not been on our boat yet but have had a couple of weeks on two identical sister boats. We are absolutely made up about how they sail - they are fast yet comfortable and we can handle them perfectly well with two of us. We have been pleased with the level of maintenance on the boats we've sailed and more than pleased with the attitude of the base staff at the 2 bases we've been to. At this stage it's a case of so far so good

Hope that helps
 

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Pipemma, since you bought the 44i: Did you get the Performance version? Any downsides to the boat now that you've had a chance to sail it a bit? I am considering a 42i, but I notice that the designer of the 44 Briand is different than the 42's Lombard... anything you know about that?
Thanks for the input.
Good sailing to you.
 
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