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I agree with the advice to contact the sail maker and find out why the sail is cut that way.

Having seen the pictures, it looks like this sail was made for a cunningham. If you look at the picture there is a large hole at the tack and a smaller hole above. My sense is that the smaller hole was intended to have heavy duty slug that would be in the track and position the foot fore and aft, and the larger hole looks like it is intended for a cunningham.

blobaugh's sketch would not work without the heavy slug in the track or a strop around the mast since the load from the outhaul would pull the sail away from the mast and distort the shape of the sail.

Sails that are meant to be flown loose footed are generally cut and reinforced differently than sails that are meant for a shelf foot. You may be able to fly the sail the way that blobaugh suggests, but its probably not a great idea.

Jeff
 

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Barquito
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Here are a couple of rough drawings with a couple ideas that have been mentioned (if I understood correctly):



 

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Sails that are meant to be flown loose footed are generally cut and reinforced differently than sails that are meant for a shelf foot. You may be able to fly the sail the way that blobaugh suggests, but its probably not a great idea.
Fair. It at least worked on my Spirit 23. I am the mainsail trimmer on a few very active race boats and I was happy with how the main performed. Does not mean it will work with all mains though!
 

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I've got to agree with Jeff and the others who said contact the sail maker. None of us seem to know why the sail was designed that way, but we have come up with some innovative ways to make the sail work in a way it was not designed. Some times simplicity is best and hopefully the sail maker can explain a simple way to fly the sail.

Failing that, I vote for Barquito's top drawing, with a slug to the mast track and a strop to the boom. But that is taking the long way around the block to visit your next door neighbor, because the sailmaker could have avoided cutting off that triangle of sailcloth. Something is missing.
L
 

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Discussion Starter #25
I have left a message at Hyde Sails. Their website says that they are off on some sailing adventure for the time being.

I have some hefty sail slides that might work well with this.

I also have a couple of sail stops, too, that might contribute to a solution.

As I mentioned, I'll be launching tomorrow morning and should be able to hoist the mainsail and see how/where that grommet/ring/cringle (which term should I be using here?) rides when the sail is hoisted.

Maybe I'll get some pics and follow up here with them.

Thanks for all the suggestions/comments.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I took some pics of the sail during the brief time my boat was in the water.

I connected the grommet/cringle to the mast via a sail slide/slug and short shackle.

The sail shape is much better and looks better.

The metal shackle is a short one... but not quite short enough. Maybe a "soft shackle"?
 

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Most Youtube videos showing a Spirit 23 under sail do not show the cutaway like this however they do appear to show a more moderate cutaway or slight step to keep the grommet for the gooseneck slightly above the rope so everything aligns.

It will be interesting to hear from the sail maker when they get back.
 

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The rest of the sail looks good :)


I believe you are going to want a downhaul on there too, which maybe that is the red line and it is not tied yet. In which case ignore me!
 

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Discussion Starter #30
Ah yes... snap-in shackles!! I've seen these before. Thanks for that suggestion... probably better than the metal shackle.

Still not heard back from Hyde Sails. I'll stay on them until I get a response.

Yes, Ben, I was thinking of putting on a downhaul to see how that affects this setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #31
I heard back from Hyde Sails. Here's what was said:


"I really don't have an answer for you. It looks to me like maybe there is some hardware missing at the gooseneck. Or the boom has been replaced. Or maybe somebody altered the sail so it could be rigged with a "floating tack" It may be that the sail was originally built with a bolt rope rather than slides on the luff.

I'm really not sure from looking at the pictures.

I think you could set it up with a matching slide on the lowest grommet, attached with webbing. It should be set up so that the slide pulls the luff about 2 mm "tighter" to the mast groove than the slide above it. Then use the cunningham (upper empty grommet) as a downhaul."

That's it.

I did look for some info on a "floating tack." Here's a link to a discussion:

Floating Tack - Sailing Anarchy - Sailing Anarchy Forums

Thanks to all for your comments/suggestions/help. I think I've pretty much got the sail right now... for the most part.

Hal
Waldport OR
 

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Discussion Starter #32
BUT WAIT... THERE"S MORE from Hyde Sails:

Here's a schematic of a floating tack. Not exactly like what you've got, but similar. However, usually a floating tack is used with a bolt rope on the luff. Usually with a loose foot too.

But this would work for you.

See attachment.
 

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To add to what @hnash53 posted:

I wasn't personally involved in making this sail, so I have no prior knowledge of what the owner and sail maker were trying to accomplish. That mainsail tack configuration plus that hardware on that boom look like a mismatch to me.

I asked him to get the serial number off the sail so we could look up the history on it. Maybe we can figure out what the original hardware looked like...

Judy B
Independent dDistributor for Hyde Sails
 

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If you aren't racing one-design, feel free to do whatever makes the sail take the correct shape. If it looks right, it is right. After a few days of use, you'll have a better understanding of what needs to happen.

Google images of "NA/Spirit23" seem to show a tack cutaway to allow for an unusually long gooseneck. Fair winds!
 
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