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Discussion Starter #1
Posted this in another forum, and now realize it was probably the wrong one. This Hunter 30 was retrofit with an electric motor. The owner told me he had a tough time finding space for 12 Batteries (I'll bet!). The boot stripe at the Stearn and top of the rudder are well out of the water (not a great photo, I know). Don't know if the new motor has anything to do with it, but it appears to me she is totally off her lines, and has to be adversely affected under sail. Yes, No, thoughts?
 

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... it appears to me she is totally off her lines, and has to be adversely affected under sail.
One would think. As scottyt suggested: I imagine she's much more prone to heading up and broaching.

People do the strangest, and most unfortunate things, to boats :rolleyes:

Jim
 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited)
I don't know what the electric motor would weigh, but (off the top of my head) I think a decent deep cell weighs about 60 pounds. 10 at 60 pounds (assuming he already had two) is 600 pounds. I would think he could have fit several batteries where his fuel tank used to be. My Yanmar weighs 210 dry, then there is oil and fuel, of course. I assume the electric motor has a transmission, but don't know how it would compare. I'm sure if I was really that interested, I could search and find plenty of info here. Seems like a noble idea, but what a nightmare! The good news is, I didn't think a steaming sailboat made much noise until I saw this boat glide by! Very stealthy, but it sure doesn't look right!
 

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I saw an Islander 28 with an electric drive. No tranny. They didn't remove the fuel tank and put batteries there because there was no access to it--they would have had to cut the deck up to get it out.
 

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Rebalance the boat

It seems to me that you could relocate weight on board to balance the boat again. The removal of the original engine would certainly change the balance of the boat and effect the sailing of the boat as well. It looks like the small electric motor that you have would only weigh a fraction of what the original motor and transmission weighed. If the batteries are forward move them aft.

Good Luck,

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I saw an Islander 28 with an electric drive. No tranny. They didn't remove the fuel tank and put batteries there because there was no access to it--they would have had to cut the deck up to get it out.
Interesting. I would have been tempted to cut the tank out and place batteries there as the weight would have replicated the weight from the fuel the boat was designed to carry. Unless by "no access" you mean that there was no access to the compartment at all, in which case, it would be a terrible design IMO. Thats a lot of space to go unused in a small boat. Maybe they were not fully committed to the electric concept yet. I would have to be fully committed before I would make a radical move like that!
 

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Posted this in another forum, and now realize it was probably the wrong one. This Hunter 30 was retrofit with an electric motor. The owner told me he had a tough time finding space for 12 Batteries (I'll bet!). The boot stripe at the Stern and top of the rudder are well out of the water (not a great photo, I know). Don't know if the new motor has anything to do with it, but it appears to me she is totally off her lines, and has to be adversely affected under sail. Yes, No, thoughts?
Are you concerned with the aesthetics of how the boat looks sitting at the dock? Rather than a static photo of the boat at the dock, you need to see how the boat performs under sail. Once the boat is up to hull speed, the stern section will be deeper in the water.

While underway inspect how the water streams off the stern. Usually boats have a tendency to squat when sailing even though they are on their lines at the dock.

A Hunter 30 is relatively small to the extent that weight placement will make a big difference. Moving all or some of the batteries aft would be noticeable but perhaps unnecessary. The same result could be attained by filling the lazaret with sails and other clutter. If your cruising with five people that could be 600-1000 lb sitting in the cockpit.

Rather than fussing over getting the trim just right at the dock, I'd take it out in a few different wind conditions to see if changes are really essential.
 

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We have had two Hunter 30's in our family. Both were sweet sailing boats but like any 30 footer, a bit sensitive to weight trim. Given my experience with these boats, being that far out of trim would really screw up the sailing ability of the boat in moderate to heavy air. It might also make it hard to track in light winds. Normally when change a boat over to electric drive, great care must be taken in where you place the batteries and in adding trim ballast to get the boat to sit on her lines.

Jeff
 

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Discussion Starter #11 (Edited)
Are you concerned with the aesthetics of how the boat looks sitting at the dock? Rather than a static photo of the boat at the dock, you need to see how the boat performs under sail. Once the boat is up to hull speed, the stern section will be deeper in the water.

Rather than fussing over getting the trim just right at the dock, I'd take it out in a few different wind conditions to see if changes are really essential.
First of all, it's not my boat, and I'm not at all concerned. If I was, "aesthetics" would certainly be the least of my concerns. I'm asking the question because I'm curious and want to learn. I am under the impression that the water lines painted on the hull should give some indication of when the boat is in balance for optimum performance, including anticipation of an average size crew. Obviously, the lines are a little difficult to view while underway, and the real test is how she sails. The lines on my boat are fairly symmetrical in relation to the water line, as are most boats I see. I see similar Hunters around, and none of them sits in the water like this one, and certainly don't have as much (if any) rudder exposed. Just curious and want to learn, simple as that:) In fact, I just learned how to spell aesthetics. Spell checked and thought I was going to correct you, but I got corrected:eek: What the hell is an e doing there? Well, at least I didn't spell it assthetics!:laugher Anyway, I digress.
 
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