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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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Discussion Starter #1
We have been off cruising in Long Island Sound for the last month or so hence not being online here much at all. Tomorrow we are heading off for Bermuda. Looking forward to some nice weather for a change. The forecast for the next few days looks pretty good so we shall see.

Will check in when we get there and find internet.
 

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Telstar 28
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Good luck, fairwinds... :)
 

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I'd rather be sailing
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Hey Valiente - Where on Eleuthera is you wife and what boat is she helping to deliver (Veleda?)? We're sitting by Harbor Island on the northern tip of Eleuthera.
 

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She doesn't know. It's Veleda and she has instructions to ask a cabbie to drive her to it. On an island like that, "common knowledge" is really that, apparently.

They are supposed to leave Monday morning.
 

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I'd rather be sailing
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Veleda is in Rock Sound at the elbow of Eleuthera, right off the government dock. I conversed with the owner and I'm very glad to hear that they've worked out a way to get Veleda home. We were passing through Rock Sound and she wanted to know if we had remembered seeing if Veleda was OK. It's funny how small a world it is... Veleda's owner happens to find our blog on the web, sends me an e-mail asking if we had looked at her boat when passing through Rock Sound, and then on the Internet someone posts that their wife is crewing on a delivery north, I happen to read the thread and here we are...
 

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Aeolus II
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Killarney Sailor, Fair winds and Following Seas! Do you have a spot on board so we can follow? Also, take pictures so us home based sailors can be really envious.
 

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Veleda is in Rock Sound at the elbow of Eleuthera, right off the government dock. I conversed with the owner and I'm very glad to hear that they've worked out a way to get Veleda home. We were passing through Rock Sound and she wanted to know if we had remembered seeing if Veleda was OK. It's funny how small a world it is... Veleda's owner happens to find our blog on the web, sends me an e-mail asking if we had looked at her boat when passing through Rock Sound, and then on the Internet someone posts that their wife is crewing on a delivery north, I happen to read the thread and here we are...
You know, I've read that while hundreds of thousands of people cruise coastally and liveaboard, the number of people actively on passage (or preparing to do so) from a given area at any one time is quite low. Maybe this is why the trail of breadcrumbs leading to "coincidence" seems so short.

The Milliards on Veleda IV ran into Ken and Lynn on Silverheels III (friends of ours who went a-Bahama-ing last September) as they were preparing to head to Chesapeake for the hurricane season. Ken and Lynn forwarded the Milliard's call for crew to us, knowing we were looking for "real" sea hours for both the experience and to qualify for stuff like the RYA. As I've followed the Milliard's blog on and off for years, and as Judy was once my dentist (more small worldliness), they were a semi-known quantity. They are also quite involved in the local Power Squadron, and Aubrey's ex-Navy, so they can be reasonably assumed to have a high degree of seamanship skills.

So it was a good fit. I would've gone had I not been working and had the delivery been a week later. But I understand that "a week later" at the beginning of hurricane season is a throw of the dice, and so my wife left this morning in the dark and at this moment is probably on the tarmac for the jump to Nassau.

I think what can be learned from this for the original poster and for anyone seeking to be delivery crew is that crewing opportunities can arise quite quickly (particularly the juicy downwind ones with the Gulf Stream adding a few knots in the right direction!). One has to be flexible and have a bag packed and one's papers in order. Obviously, my wife is currently unemployed at everything but being a mother and renovating the house for tenants (not minor in terms of work, mind you!), and I work from home, so we have the option with only minor adjustments to seize at these opportunities.

Others would have to schedule crewing during holidays or unpaid leave...this is less attractive, naturally. For us, it means the floors won't be redone until July...but that is well worth a thousand sea miles of experience in the Atlantic.


EDIT: Oops, I forgot I was in Bruce's Bermuda thread and not the "how do I become crew?" thread!

I didn't get a lot of sleep last night.
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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4,526 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
Back from Bermuda

Had a very good time overall and it was a most useful shakedown for the cruising to follow.

Going down, the big problem was lack of wind for the second half of the passage. We had to motor a lot and when we switched tanks the new tank had a huge amount of water in it which stopped the diesel pretty quickly! We bled and bled and changed Racor elements and engine filters and were not able to get it started. Sailed into St George's and anchored in Powder Hole to clear customs. A really good mechanic from St George's Boatyard quickly got the engine going (water in the high pressure pump) and assured me that no permanent damage had been done. Repair was quick, thorough and not expensive (by any standard, let alone Bermuda). I am wondering if water is getting in through the fuel fill? It is an older unit with a plastic plug and no separate O-ring. Will drain some fuel from the bottom of the tank now and see if there is any water - we were on the same tack for four days coming back and there was water sitting on deck over the fill for much of the time.

Bermuda is still lovely and it was wonderful to get somewhere warm after such a cool spring in the NE United States. It is getting ever more crowded though. The Tall Ships came in while we were there. Pride of Baltimore II was first to arrive and sailed into the harbor under full sail - very impressive. We were docked very close to the bowsprit of the Bounty (not to mention the other parts of the ship!) - neat to come out in the morning and see a fully-rigged ship there.

Coming back was very easy with good winds almost all the way. It took 4 1/2 days we were certainly not pushing it. Had a slow time in the Gulf Stream but this was made up for by getting on the right side of a warm eddy after leaving the stream. Had about 30 knots for about 15 minutes or so, other than that it was in the 10 to 22 range.

I now have about two dozen things to work on. Highlights of the trip - the new Monitor worked great although I need to replace two blocks that do not have wide enough sheave sides to prevent chafing. This was my first offshore experience with a big (to me) boat and having 34000 pounds does make it more comfortable than 10k to 15k (my previous experience). We caught a 6 to 7 pound tuna of some sort shortly after leaving Sandy Hook which was fun. Did not land a much larger fish that left some very impressive tooth marks on a very big lure - on balance a good thing I think.

Will try to post some pictures when I get a chance.

Bruce
 

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Had a very good time overall and it was a most useful shakedown for the cruising to follow.

Going down, the big problem was lack of wind for the second half of the passage. We had to motor a lot and when we switched tanks the new tank had a huge amount of water in it which stopped the diesel pretty quickly! We bled and bled and changed Racor elements and engine filters and were not able to get it started. Sailed into St George's and anchored in Powder Hole to clear customs. A really good mechanic from St George's Boatyard quickly got the engine going (water in the high pressure pump) and assured me that no permanent damage had been done. Repair was quick, thorough and not expensive (by any standard, let alone Bermuda). I am wondering if water is getting in through the fuel fill? It is an older unit with a plastic plug and no separate O-ring. Will drain some fuel from the bottom of the tank now and see if there is any water - we were on the same tack for four days coming back and there was water sitting on deck over the fill for much of the time.

Bermuda is still lovely and it was wonderful to get somewhere warm after such a cool spring in the NE United States. It is getting ever more crowded though. The Tall Ships came in while we were there. Pride of Baltimore II was first to arrive and sailed into the harbor under full sail - very impressive. We were docked very close to the bowsprit of the Bounty (not to mention the other parts of the ship!) - neat to come out in the morning and see a fully-rigged ship there.

Coming back was very easy with good winds almost all the way. It took 4 1/2 days we were certainly not pushing it. Had a slow time in the Gulf Stream but this was made up for by getting on the right side of a warm eddy after leaving the stream. Had about 30 knots for about 15 minutes or so, other than that it was in the 10 to 22 range.

I now have about two dozen things to work on. Highlights of the trip - the new Monitor worked great although I need to replace two blocks that do not have wide enough sheave sides to prevent chafing. This was my first offshore experience with a big (to me) boat and having 34000 pounds does make it more comfortable than 10k to 15k (my previous experience). We caught a 6 to 7 pound tuna of some sort shortly after leaving Sandy Hook which was fun. Did not land a much larger fish that left some very impressive tooth marks on a very big lure - on balance a good thing I think.

Will try to post some pictures when I get a chance.

Bruce
Bruce,

Congrats on the successful voyage! Looking forward to the photos.:)

P.S. I'm inclined to go with your theory about the source of water in the diesel fuel tank. Sometimes a thin o-ring can be added to those older fill caps.... Glad you were able to get that sorted out in Bermuda.
 

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Glad to hear of your safe passage, Bruce. I concur that an o-ring on the fuel fill cap is essential, along with a nice "glaze" of lithium grease to act as both as an additional barrier and as a sort of anti-seize so you can really screw the cap tightly.

I have been mulling over the utility of actually replacing the flush fill cap on passage with a short, teflon-taped length of pipe in order to eliminate the issue of standing water leaking down the fill hose. Filling via jerry can would be simpler with a bit of height (I'm talking six inches here) as well.
 
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