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They don't exist. Because of the requirements to meet Type 1 classification they have to be large and bulky. They are almost never worn except once abandoning ship becomes a serious reality and even then inflatables are generally prefered.
 

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Kynntana (Freedom 38)
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Yep. They don't exist. It seems an inflatable is the only way to get low profile AND at least 33 lb of lift. My thought, because I live in an area that's pretty cold, is to get a float coat and a good form fitting inflatable. Best of both worlds in my opinion. Won't work in the tropics though.....
 

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The only reason that you might want a type 1 is if you are taking passengers for hire in US waters. Even if you take one passenger you must have a type 1 for each passenger and crew member aboard. There is some ratio of adult to child's type 1 aboard if you are chartering, but I've forgotten it. Contact USCG or the CFR's for the exact regs.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
They don't exist. Because of the requirements to meet Type 1 classification they have to be large and bulky. They are almost never worn except once abandoning ship becomes a serious reality and even then inflatables are generally prefered.
I am looking for a good non inflatable off shore PFD do you have any suggestions.
 

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The Salus is about as far from a Type 1 as it's possible to get. It isn't even USCG aproved as a lifejacket because it lacks enough boyancy.

Don't get me wrong, wearing a type 1 is a bit silly for day to day wear, but that wasn't the question.
 

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The Salus Coastal is a harness, not a PFD. They do offer other variations that are PFD listed, but that said, if you read their FAQ section, it says "The PFD has 15 ½ lbs of buoyancy and will come in a wide range of styles, sizes and colors." Their size chart also lists that it meets Canadian General Standards Board Standard CAN/CGSB-65.11-M88 - which, taken from Canadian code is as follows :

Subsection 240(2)
Personal flotation devices meeting CGSB Standard CAN/CGSB-65.11-M88, Personal Flotation Devices, are the most common and generally the most comfortable personal flotation device, offering up to 69 newtons (15.5 pounds-force) of buoyancy. A device meeting this Standard is not required to turn an unconscious person from a facedown position in the water to a position where the wearer’s face is out of the water. The shell colour is bright yellow, orange or red. These devices can be either the vest or “key hole” style.

Short version, Salus doesn't make a Type 1.

(And, they really could do better to put more specifications on their products for those facts)
 

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The vest looks OK, but I probably would not buy one simply based on one of their promo pics. Ugh.

Clipped in to the lifeline? That will keep you aboard!

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
 

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Yeah, I laughed at that too. "Hey, it's called a lifeline! Isn't that what it's for?"

Without getting into questioning the OP's motives, it seems that there are several Type I's that aren't just an orange, foam brick.
The only thing that I don't like, is that none of them seem to offer crotch or thigh straps. The Type I kapok PFDs I used in the Navy had thigh straps.
In heavy seas, I feel that these are essential to keeping a PFD in the proper position on the body.
 
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